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Effect of Simulation on PALS Training

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00562744
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 22, 2007
Last Update Posted : November 22, 2007
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Laerdal Medical
Information provided by:
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

November 21, 2007
November 22, 2007
November 22, 2007
January 2006
Not Provided
Cognitive performance in mock resuscitation scenarios [ Time Frame: immediate ]
Same as current
No Changes Posted
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Effect of Simulation on PALS Training
The Effect of High-Fidelity Simulation on Pediatric Advanced Life Support Training in Pediatric Housestaff: a Randomized Trial
Patient simulation is a new and expanding technology that has proven effective as a teaching tool in various clinical settings, but data on pediatric simulation is lacking. Mock resuscitation scenarios have been shown in prior studies to be effective for improving knowledge, skill, and confidence in pediatric housestaff. Our objective is to assess the utility of a training program utilizing a human patient simulator of an infant as a teaching tool for pediatric housestaff training in resuscitation skills. We hypothesize that mock resuscitation exercises performed by pediatric housestaff on a patient simulator will result in improved performance on test scenarios when compared to the same training on a standard manikin.

Patient simulation is a new and expanding technology that has proven effective as a teaching tool in various clinical settings, but data on pediatric simulation is lacking. Mock resuscitation scenarios have been shown in prior studies to be effective for improving knowledge, skill, and confidence in pediatric housestaff. Our objective is to assess the utility of a training program utilizing a human patient simulator of an infant as a teaching tool for pediatric housestaff training in resuscitation skills. We hypothesize that mock resuscitation exercises performed by pediatric housestaff on a patient simulator will result in improved performance on test scenarios when compared to the same training on a standard manikin.

We propose a randomized trial of pediatric residents of identical training levels from three children's hospitals. Participants will be assigned to a control group or an intervention group. The control group will undertake mock resuscitation scenarios on a standard manikin; the intervention group will perform the same exercises on a simulator. A test scenario will be administered at the end of each set of training scenarios and frequency and timing of a predetermined list of critical clinical assessments and interventions will be recorded. Analysis will consist of a comparison between control and intervention groups for success rates and time to completion for clinical assessments and interventions.

Interventional
Not Applicable
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Pediatric Housestaff
Other: Simulation
Use of high-fidelity patient simulator for training and assessment of PALS scenario performance
  • Experimental: SIM
    Participants complete training and assessment of performance in PALS scenarios using high-fidelity simulator
    Intervention: Other: Simulation
  • No Intervention: MAN
    Participants complete training and assessment of performance in PALS scenarios using mannequin
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
51
Same as current
September 2007
Not Provided

Inclusion Criteria:

  • PGY 1 or 2 in pediatrics at CHOP, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, or A.I. DuPont Hospital for Children
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Child, Adult, Older Adult
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00562744
2005-9-4379
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Laerdal Medical
Principal Investigator: Aaron Donoghue, MD, MSCE CHOP
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
November 2007

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP