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Profonycia - Honey for Improving Quality of Patient's Life Receiving Chemotherapy

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified September 2007 by Ziv Hospital.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
Ziv Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00524797
First received: September 2, 2007
Last updated: NA
Last verified: September 2007
History: No changes posted
September 2, 2007
September 2, 2007
September 2007
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No Changes Posted
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Profonycia - Honey for Improving Quality of Patient's Life Receiving Chemotherapy
Profonycia - Honey for Improving Quality of Patient's Life Receiving Chemotherapy

Myelosuppression (bone marrow suppression) is the most important toxic side effect of the majority of chemotherapeutic agents and typically is the dose limiting factor. Death occurring after chemotherapy usually results either from infection related to drug induced leucopenia or from bleeding related to thrombocytopenia. Colony stimulating factors (CSFs) are widely used in the treatment of chemotherapy induced neutropenia. The same Erythropoetines are used in the treatment of chemotherapy induced anemia. Both treatments are expensive and have several side effects.

In our previous stud (1) we found a special kind of honey: Life-Mel Honey to reduce the incidence of chemotherapy induced pancytopenia and improving quality of life.

The aim of the recent planed study is to provide prophylactic and protective treatment against neutropenia reducing the need for secondary CSF administration in patients receiving chemotherapy along with a natural and non expensive honey: Profonycia.

This honey which is expressed in Kibutz Shamir in Upper Galliee seems promising and easy for administration: given 5 gr/day per os for 7 days from the administration of chemotherapy.

Not Provided
Interventional
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Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Open Label
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Myelosuppression
Dietary Supplement: Profonycia
Active Comparator: Main
50 patients will receive Profonycia 5 gr/day PO for 7 days
Intervention: Dietary Supplement: Profonycia
Zidan J, Shetver L, Gershuny A, Abzah A, Tamam S, Stein M, Friedman E. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia by special honey intake. Med Oncol. 2006;23(4):549-52.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Unknown status
50
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Inclusion Criteria:

Patients 18 years old or elder receiving chemotherapy 1/2-3 weeks

Exclusion Criteria:

Patients below 18 years old

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Israel
 
 
NCT00524797
HP 7-260 S
No
Not Provided
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Ziv Hospital
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Principal Investigator: Zidan Jamal, Prof Ziv MC
Ziv Hospital
September 2007

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP