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Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atrial Septal Defects

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00498446
First Posted: July 10, 2007
Last Update Posted: June 19, 2013
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
Duke University
July 9, 2007
July 10, 2007
June 19, 2013
July 2002
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00498446 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atrial Septal Defects
Imaging of Atrial Septal Defects by Velocity Encoded Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
An atrial septal defect (ASD) is a hole in the heart that can lead to heart failure. Depending on the size and severity of the ASD, They can be treated during a heart catheterization with a special device that can permanently seal the ASD, but knowing the exact size and severity of the ASD is crucial. Newer MRI techniques may provide a better way at diagnosing the size and severity of an ASD. We compared MRI to other standard clinical ways for evaluating an ASD.

Background: Atrial septal defect (ASD) flow can be measured indirectly by velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance (veCMR) of the pulmonary artery and aorta (Qp/Qs). Imaging the secundum ASD en face could potentially enable direct flow measurement and, additionally, provide valuable information regarding ASD size, shape, location, and proximity to other structures.

Methods: Patients referred for possible transcatheter ASD closure underwent a comprehensive standard evaluation including transesophageal and/or intracardiac echocardiography (ICE), and invasive oximetry. CMR was performed in parallel and included direct en face veCMR after an optimal double-oblique imaging plane was determined accounting for ASD flow direction and cardiac-cycle interatrial septal motion.

We hypothesized that En face veCMR using an optimized imaging plane can accurately determine ASD flow, size, and morphology, and that it would provide information incremental to comprehensive standard evaluation.

Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Atrial Septal Defect
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Thomson LE, Crowley AL, Heitner JF, Cawley PJ, Weinsaft JW, Kim HW, Parker M, Judd RM, Harrison JK, Kim RJ. Direct en face imaging of secundum atrial septal defects by velocity-encoded cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients evaluated for possible transcatheter closure. Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2008 Jul;1(1):31-40. doi: 10.1161/CIRCIMAGING.108.769786.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
44
July 2004
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • Suspected Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) undergoing evaluation for possible transcatheter closure

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging
  • known sinus venosus or primum defects
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00498446
3938
No
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Duke University
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Principal Investigator: Raymond J Kim, MD Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center
Duke University
July 2007