We updated the design of this site on September 25th. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Cognitive Therapy to Improve Word Finding

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00494520
First Posted: June 29, 2007
Last Update Posted: September 19, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Georgetown University
June 28, 2007
June 29, 2007
September 19, 2017
July 2004
June 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Improved picture naming of trained words. [ Time Frame: Following conclusion of word treatment. ]
Overall accuracy of named trained items
Improved picture naming of trained words.
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00494520 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Improved picture naming of trained words. [ Time Frame: At 6 months after conclusion of word treatment ]
    Overall accuracy of named trained items
  • Improved picture naming of untrained words. [ Time Frame: Following conclusion of word treatment. ]
    Overall accuracy of named untrained items
  • Improved picture naming of untrained words. [ Time Frame: At 6 months after conclusion of word treatment ]
    Overall accuracy of named untrained items
Improved picture naming of untrained words.
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Cognitive Therapy to Improve Word Finding
Learning Paradigms in Aphasia Rehabilitation
Adults who sustain brain damage due to stroke, traumatic injury or surgery may develop difficulty finding words. This study compares the effectiveness of two behavior-based programs to improve picture naming ability in these individuals.
Difficulty finding words is common in patients with aphasia subsequent to left hemisphere stroke. This study will compare two cognitive therapies for the treatment of acquired word finding difficulties. The therapies use different types of cues. All participants will receive both therapies. Participants in this study will undergo a comprehensive and detailed assessment of language and other cognitive skills. The two treatments will be compared for their efficacy.
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Anomia
  • Aphasia
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Cerebrovascular Accident
  • Procedure: Errorful training condition
    Errorful training condition: Participant saw a picture and named it without any cues. If an error was produced, the cue with the least amount of information was provided (e.g. for "pumpkin", "pu"). Cues with increasing information were provided until the picture was correctly named (e.g. for "pumpkin": "pump", "pumpki", then "pumpkin"). Once the correct name was provided, the trial ended.
  • Procedure: Errorless training condition
    Errorless learning (EL) condition: Participant saw a picture with its name, and repeated the word. The participant continued to name the picture as the auditory cues provided less and less of the word (e.g. for "banana" she would hear "banan", "bana" then "ba" and finally no cue). If an error was produced at any stage, the whole word was presented, the participant repeated it, and the trial ended.
  • Experimental: Errorful training condition
    A type of anomia rehabilitation paradigm which allows for errors. The intervention involves providing minimal auditory cues to allow for errors in picture naming.
    Intervention: Procedure: Errorful training condition
  • Experimental: Errorless training condition
    A type of anomia rehabilitation paradigm in which the situation surrounding the performance of the desired task (i.e., picture naming) is controlled to prevent errors. The intervention involves providing maximal auditory cues to prevent errors in picture naming.
    Intervention: Procedure: Errorless training condition
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
78
June 2009
June 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Word finding difficulty subsequent to stroke, traumatic brain injury, brain surgery or other brain damage occuring at least 6 month prior to participation
  • Ability to attend 2 sessions per week for several months at Georgetown University in Washington, DC

Exclusion Criteria:

  • History of learning disabilities
  • Best corrected vision less than 20/40
  • Corrected hearing within functional limits
  • Less than 10 years formal education
  • Significant memory or comprehension problems
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years and older   (Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00494520
R01DC006934-01( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
No
Not Provided
Plan to Share IPD: No
Georgetown University
Georgetown University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Rhonda B. Friedman, Ph.D. Georgetown University
Georgetown University
April 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP