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Hirschsprung Disease Genetic Study

This study is currently recruiting participants.
Verified February 2017 by Johns Hopkins University
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00478712
First Posted: May 25, 2007
Last Update Posted: February 27, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Johns Hopkins University
May 24, 2007
May 25, 2007
February 27, 2017
January 2001
March 2025   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • Discovery and characterization of common genetic variation associated with Hirschsprung disease [ Time Frame: DNA is isolated up to 1 year after enrollment ]
    Genome-wide assays of common genetic variation will be assessed using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays
  • Discovery and characterization of copy number variants associated with Hirschsprung disease [ Time Frame: DNA is isolated up to 1 year after enrollment ]
    Copy number variation will be detected using next generation sequencing data and high resolution microarrays that allow for detection of copy number variants across the genome
  • Discovery and characterization of rare genetic variation associated with Hirschsprung disease [ Time Frame: DNA is isolated up to 1 year after enrollment ]
    Exome sequencing will be used to detect rare variation across all genes in the genome
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00478712 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Correlation of genetic variants with location of transition zone in Hirschsprung disease [ Time Frame: Baseline pathology data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment ]
    Pathology records and surgical records will be used to determine transition zone
  • Correlation of genetic variants with risk for enterocolitis in Hirschsprung disease [ Time Frame: Baseline clinical data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment ]
  • Characterization of Hirschsprung disease that co-occurs with a known chromosomal disorder [ Time Frame: Baseline clinical data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment ]
  • Characterization of Hirschsprung disease that co-occurs with a known single gene syndrome [ Time Frame: Baseline clinical data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment ]
  • Characterization of Hirschsprung disease that co-occurs with other congenital anomalies without a known diagnosis [ Time Frame: Baseline clinical data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment ]
  • Correlation of genetic variants with need for repeat pull-through surgery in Hirschsprung disease [ Time Frame: Baseline clinical data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment and follow up data is obtained up to 100 years after enrollment ]
    Assessment of complications that lead to eventual repeat pull-through surgery
  • Correlation of genetic variants with difficulty controlling stools after pull-through surgery [ Time Frame: Baseline clinical data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment and follow up data is obtained up to 100 years after enrollment ]
  • Correlation of genetic variants with chronic constipation after pull-through surgery [ Time Frame: Baseline clinical data is obtained up to 1 year after enrollment and follow up data is obtained up to 100 years after enrollment ]
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Hirschsprung Disease Genetic Study
Genetic Analysis of Hirschsprung Disease
Hirschsprung disease is a genetic condition caused by lack of nerve cells in varying lengths of the intestines. This study will investigate the complex genetic basis of the disease, which involves multiple interacting genetic factors.

Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a birth defect resulting from the absence of nerve (ganglion) cells in the gastrointestinal tract. Hirschsprung disease has a population incidence of 1/5000 live births and most often occurs as an isolated condition. However, approximately 30% of HSCR cases are associated with other birth defects such as Down syndrome, deafness, hypopigmentation, and congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Hirschsprung disease is a genetic condition with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and multigenic patterns of inheritance described.

Dr. Aravinda Chakravarti's laboratory at Johns Hopkins University has been investigating the genetics of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) for more than twenty five years. The goal of this research study is to identify genes harboring causative HSCR mutations and to better understand the complex inheritance of HSCR in families by whole genome mapping and sequencing studies. Specifically, the study aims to determine the frequency with which mutations in any human gene lead to familial and isolated forms of HSCR. Further, the study will collect clinical information and investigate possible genotype - phenotype correlations.

Molecular analysis using markers and sequencing, and statistical analysis of these data will be used to identify regions of human chromosomes where putative HSCR disease genes may be located. In addition, the DNA sequence of known and/or suspected HSCR genes will be assessed in individual patients and their family members, in search of causative HSCR susceptibility variants and variants that may affect presentation of the disease and treatment outcomes. Phenotypic information will include pathology, surgical, and other clinical outcomes related to Hirschsprung disease. This study will hopefully lead to a better understanding of the genetics of HSCR and, further down the road, improved diagnosis, treatment, and genetic counseling.

This study asks volunteers to:

  1. Complete a medical/family history questionnaire
  2. Provide access to some medical records
  3. Submit blood samples from the individual(s) affected with Hirschsprung disease and his/her parents (if available)
Observational
Observational Model: Family-Based
Time Perspective: Prospective
Not Provided
Retention:   Samples With DNA
Description:
Study volunteers are asked to provide blood or cheek swab/saliva samples. DNA is extracted from the samples for use in the study.
Non-Probability Sample
The study population includes individuals with Hirschsprung disease and their family members.
Hirschsprung Disease
Other: Identification of genetic causes of Hirschsprung Disease
Blood, saliva, or DNA samples are requested from all study participants. The blood or saliva samples are used to isolate DNA in all participants. Blood samples are also used to establish cell lines in some participants.
Families with Hirschsprung Disease
Individuals with Hirschsprung disease and their affected and unaffected relatives.
Intervention: Other: Identification of genetic causes of Hirschsprung Disease

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruiting
3000
March 2025
March 2025   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

- Individuals with Hirschsprung disease and their first degree relatives (any segment length of disease, with or without other congenital anomalies or health problems, single or multiple affected individuals in family)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Unable or unwilling to provide sample for genetic studies
  • Individual, parent, or guardian unable to comprehend and provide informed consent
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Yes
Contact: Courtney Berrios, ScM 410-502-7541 hirschsprung@jhmi.edu
Contact: Aravinda Chakravarti, PhD 410-502-7525 hirschsprung@jhmi.edu
United States
 
 
NCT00478712
NA_00035221
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Aravinda Chakravarti, PhD Johns Hopkins University
Johns Hopkins University
February 2017
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