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Effectiveness of High Protein Diets in Promoting Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Subjects.

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified February 2007 by University of Wollongong.
Recruitment status was:  Not yet recruiting
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00421616
First Posted: January 12, 2007
Last Update Posted: February 19, 2007
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Centre of Excellence in Functional Foods, Australia
Information provided by:
University of Wollongong
January 11, 2007
January 12, 2007
February 19, 2007
February 2007
Not Provided
  • Weight & anthropometric measurements at 0 and 3 months
  • Energy expenditure
  • Substrate oxidation
  • Compliance to diets
Same as current
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00421616 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Blood lipids
  • Appetite
Same as current
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Effectiveness of High Protein Diets in Promoting Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Subjects.
A Diet Higher in Animal-Based Protein is More Effective in Promoting Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Individuals Than Other Protein Based Diets.
Several studies have reported greater weight loss when following high meat-protein diets but limited studies have studied high plant-based protein diets. Thus we aim to investigate the effect of high protein diets in weight management and also to investigate the superior protein source in achieving this effect. In addition, we aim to develop dietary intervention strategies that are realistic and sustainable.
Participants will be randomised to either high-protein diets (30% of energy) from animal or plant sources or standard protein diet (15% of energy) weight loss diet for 3 months.
Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Overweight
Behavioral: High protein diet study
Not Provided
Tan SY, Batterham M, Tapsell L. Activity counts from accelerometers do not add value to energy expenditure predictions in sedentary overweight individuals during weight loss interventions. J Phys Act Health. 2011 Jul;8(5):675-81.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Unknown status
45
Not Provided
Not Provided

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Overweight or obese
  • Age 18 and above
  • Both males and females
  • Live in Illawarra Area of Australia

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Regular medication
  • Smoker
  • Food allergies
  • Presence of disease which may alter metabolic rate
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Australia
 
 
NCT00421616
HE06/332
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
University of Wollongong
National Centre of Excellence in Functional Foods, Australia
Principal Investigator: Marijka Batterham, PhD Smart Foods Centre, University of Wollongong
Principal Investigator: Linda Tapsell, PhD National Centre of Excellence in Functional Foods, Australia
Principal Investigator: Arthur Jenkins, PhD School of Health Sciences, University of Wollongong
University of Wollongong
February 2007

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP