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Study of Campral (Acamprosate) for Alcohol Dependence in a Family Medicine Clinic

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00381043
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 27, 2006
Results First Posted : March 22, 2013
Last Update Posted : May 17, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):

September 26, 2006
September 27, 2006
September 13, 2012
March 22, 2013
May 17, 2017
August 2006
July 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • % Dropout [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    Percentage of participants who dropped out of study by drug condition
  • Percent Days Abstinent [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    %Days without any alcohol consumption over the treatment period
  • Percent days abstinent from pre-treatment to in or post treatment
  • Adherence to medicine
  • Drop-out/loss to follow-up rate
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00381043 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
  • Retention [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    Number of individuals retained in the trial by acamprosate vs placebo group
  • Percent With Complete Abstinence [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    % of subjects with no drinking during the 12 week treatment trial
  • % Heavy Drinking Days During Trial [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    % of Heavy drinking days (5 or more drinks/d for a man or 4 or more drinks/d for a woman) over the 12 weeks of the trial.
  • Clinical Global Impression Scale [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    Range of overall severity of illness: 1, normal, not at all ill; 2, borderline ill; 3, mildly ill; 4, moderately ill; 5, markedly ill; 6, severely ill; or 7, extremely ill
  • % Compliant With Medication [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    % of individuals with evidence for 80% compliance with medication based on returned blister packs and weekly diaries.
  • Percent days complete abstinent
  • Percent heavy drinking days
  • Clinical Global Impression
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Study of Campral (Acamprosate) for Alcohol Dependence in a Family Medicine Clinic
Campral (Acamprosate) Treatment of Alcohol Dependence in a Family Medicine Setting: A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study
This is a study of a medication, acamprosate, which is an FDA approved medication for alcohol problems. We will be examining whether acamprosate compared to a sugar pill (placebo) is more effective for helping with drinking in a Family Medicine clinic.

Acamprosate has been shown to reduce drinking days in alcohol dependent patients and promote abstinence, with few reported side effects. A limitation of these studies, however, has been their lack of generalizability due to restrictive inclusion and exclusion criteria. Furthermore, most of the previous studies of acamprosate have been conducted in Europe, in a different treatment setting from the typical American Family Medicine center, where alcohol dependent patients are most likely to be first identified in the U.S.

The present study is designed to determine the efficacy of acamprosatefor alcohol dependence in a Family Medicine setting using minimal psychotherapeutic interventions—as would also likely occur in a primary care setting. The study will be a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial comparing 666 mg acamprosate t.i.d. to placebo in patients at the UNC Family Medicine Center with alcohol dependence. Subjects will be seen by Family Medicine physicians and receive brief motivational interventions. Primary efficacy will be determined by measuring % days abstinent and secondary outcomes include rates of complete abstinence, % heavy drinking days, CGI and GGT in the acamprosate group compared to the placebo group.

Interventional
Phase 4
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Alcohol Dependence
Drug: Acamprosate (Campral)
The study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which participants will receive 333 mg t.i.d. oral acamprosate or matching placebo for a 12-week period. Each participant will also receive brief behavioral intervention at each visit.
Other Name: Acamprosate, campral, alcohol dependence medication
  • Active Comparator: 1- Acamprosate
    The study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which participants will receive 333 mg t.i.d. oral acamprosate or matching placebo for a 12-week period. Each participant will also receive brief behavioral intervention at each visit.
    Intervention: Drug: Acamprosate (Campral)
  • Placebo Comparator: 2 - Sugar Pill - Placebo
    The study is a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial in which participants will receive 333 mg t.i.d. oral acamprosate or matching placebo for a 12-week period. Each participant will also receive brief behavioral intervention at each visit.
    Intervention: Drug: Acamprosate (Campral)

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
100
July 2008
July 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

INCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • 1. Men and women ages 21 to 65 years with a diagnosis of alcohol dependence.
  • 2. History of at least 2 heavy drinking days (men > 5 drinks/day; women > 4 drinks/day) per week, on average, during the month prior to screening.
  • 3. Ability to understand and sign written informed consent.
  • 4. Willingness to refrain from drinking for at least three days prior to randomization.
  • 5. Willingness to consider a goal of abstinence or a significant reduction in drinking as an objective.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

  • 1. Clinically significant medical disease that might interfere with the evaluation of the study medication or present a safety concern.
  • 2. Clinically significant psychiatric disease, e.g. bipolar disorder, psychosis, that might interfere with study participation or present a safety concern. [Subjects with depression or an anxiety disorder who are receiving medication and are clinically stable for at least one month will not be excluded.]
  • 3. Suicidal ideation or behavior, history of suicide attempt.
  • 4. Renal Impairment; estimated creatinine clearance <50 ml/min.
  • 5. Substance use disorder other than alcohol or nicotine dependence or cannabis abuse.
  • 6. Pregnant or breastfeeding women and women of childbearing potential who do not practice a medically acceptable form of birth control (oral or depot contraceptive, or barrier methods such as diaphragm or condom with spermicidal).
  • 7. Individuals requiring inpatient treatment or more intense outpatient treatment for their alcohol dependence. Individuals may be considered for the trial upon completion of medical detoxification.
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
21 Years to 65 Years   (Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00381043
CMP-MD-06
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
James Garbutt, MD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Principal Investigator: JC Garbutt, MD University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
April 2017

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP