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Steppin' Up: Positive Youth Development Program

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00341224
First Posted: June 21, 2006
Last Update Posted: July 2, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
June 19, 2006
June 21, 2006
July 2, 2017
July 23, 2003
December 9, 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Student fighting [ Time Frame: Immediate poste test, 12-month follow-up ]
Academic engagement, affiliation with prosocial friends, and restraing/non-agression.
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00341224 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Academic engagement [ Time Frame: Immediate post test, 12-month follow-up ]
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Steppin' Up: Positive Youth Development Program
Steppin' Up: Positive Youth Development Program

As an antidote to juvenile aggression and violence, which has increased in recent years, group mentoring offers a viable alternative to intensive one-on-one mentoring. However, no group-mentoring programs have been evaluated.

The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of a school-based, group-mentoring intervention designed to prevent aggressive and deviant behavior among early adolescents.

Study participants will be incoming 6th grade students from two inner-city Baltimore middle schools and their parents. Approximately 1,400 students and their parents are expected to participate. All 6th grade students in these schools are eligible for the study.

Weekly student group-mentoring sessions are the principal component of this study. These groups will be held during the school day and will be designed to increase social skills and encourage academic engagement, restraint, and problem-solving. A master's level professional will direct and conduct these intervention activities, which will employ the use of field trips, cooperative games, discussion of real-life situations, and role playing.

Students will also complete a 1-hour written survey each fall and spring from grades 6-8 about the program and about attitudes and behaviors related to school involvement and staying healthy and safe. Study staff will contact participants' teachers and review their past and current school records, including attendance, grades, and disciplinary information.

Parents may be asked to participate in group meetings and will complete in-person or telephone interviews (about 20 minutes each) about similar information over a 3-year period (6th grade to 8th grade).

Group mentoring offers a potentially viable alternative to intensive one-on-one mentoring. However, no group mentoring programs have been evaluated. The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of a school-based, group-mentoring intervention designed to prevent aggressive and deviant behavior among early adolescents. Two successive cohorts of incoming 6th grade students from two inner-city Baltimore middle schools and their parents will be randomized to comparison group or intervention group consisting of weekly group-mentoring sessions for youth and persuasive communication and small-group media-development projects for parents.
Interventional
Phase 2
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Mentoring
Behavioral: Group-mentoring intervention
Group mentoring used to teach social skills to middle school students
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
Not Provided
December 9, 2009
December 9, 2009   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

The population of interest for the randomized trial is 6th-grade students and their parents in two participating Baltimore middle schools. Participating schools are urban, inner-city schools located in neighborhoods with low SES and high rates of unemployment and crime.

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
12 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00341224
999903261
03-CH-N261
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Not Provided
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Not Provided
Not Provided
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
December 9, 2009

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP