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Trial record 10 of 38 for:    "Elephantiasis" | "Anthelmintics"

Interaction Between HIV and Lymphatic Filariasis

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00295698
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 24, 2006
Last Update Posted : February 24, 2006
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Danish Council for Development Research
The AIDS Foundation, Denmark
The Wedell-Wedellsborg Foundation, Denmark
Information provided by:
DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date  ICMJE February 23, 2006
First Posted Date  ICMJE February 24, 2006
Last Update Posted Date February 24, 2006
Study Start Date  ICMJE August 2001
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Current Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Original Primary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Change History No Changes Posted
Current Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Original Secondary Outcome Measures  ICMJE Not Provided
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title  ICMJE Interaction Between HIV and Lymphatic Filariasis
Official Title  ICMJE Studies on the Interaction Between HIV Infection, Lymphatic Filariasis and Diethylcarbamazine
Brief Summary The impact of lymphatic filariasis (LF) on HIV is assessed by measuring HIV viral load before and after DEC treatment of filariasis in double-infected individuals. The impact of HIV on lymphatic filariasis is assessed by measuring the success of DEC treatment on W. bancrofti antigenaemia and microfilaraemia in double-infected individuals. The effect of DEC treatment in individuals with lymphatic filariasis and/or HIV is assessed by measuring the pre- and post-treatment level of HIV viral load, immunological responses and micronutritional parameters, including antioxidants and markers of oxidative stress, in single- or double-infected individuals. The study is carried out as an anonymous, unlinked and double-blind placebo controlled study with cross-over design. The study groups comprise: 1) 18 double-infected individuals (HIV+/LF+), 2) 16 HIV infected individuals (HIV+/LF-) and 3) 25 individuals with lymphatic filariasis (HIV-/LF+). Based on stratified, blocked randomisation the study participants receive DEC treatment or placebo. Pre- and post-treatment (1 week, 12 weeks and 24 weeks post-treatment) blood samples are collected and analysed for HIV viral load, CD4+ T cell count, distinctive Th1 and Th2 cytokines, circulating filarial antigens (CFA), micronutrient status, antioxidant enzymes and markers of oxidative stress. After 12 weeks the study participants get the opposite treatment and post-treatment blood samples are collected four times with the same intervals as above.
Detailed Description

Previous studies on the interaction between HIV and helminth infections have indicated that HIV may have a negative impact on helminth infections and vice versa, and there is evidence that treatment of chronic helminth infections in HIV infected individuals can delay the progression of HIV. These interactions may be related to changes in the immunological responsiveness or through an effect on reactive oxygen compounds resulting in oxidative stress. Oxidative stress may be a neglected determinant for progression of lymphatic filariasis and may also impair immune functions and lead to increased HIV replication through activation of nuclear transcription factors. The present study examines the three-way interaction between HIV infection, lymphatic filariasis caused by the helminth parasite W. bancrofti and the drug diethylcarbamazine (DEC). DEC is an important drug for treatment of lymphatic filariasis and previous findings indicate that DEC may also have an effect on retroviral infections.

The impact of lymphatic filariasis (LF) on HIV is assessed by measuring HIV viral load before and after DEC treatment of filariasis in double-infected individuals. The impact of HIV on lymphatic filariasis is assessed by measuring the success of DEC treatment on W. bancrofti antigenaemia and microfilaraemia in double-infected individuals. The effect of DEC treatment in individuals with lymphatic filariasis and/or HIV is assessed by measuring the pre- and post-treatment level of HIV viral load, immunological responses and micronutritional parameters, including antioxidants and markers of oxidative stress, in single- or double-infected individuals. The study is carried out as an anonymous, unlinked and double-blind placebo controlled study with cross-over design. The study groups comprise: 1) 18 double-infected individuals (HIV+/LF+), 2) 16 HIV infected individuals (HIV+/LF-) and 3) 25 individuals with lymphatic filariasis (HIV-/LF+). Based on stratified, blocked randomisation the study participants receive DEC treatment or placebo. Pre- and post-treatment (1 week, 12 weeks and 24 weeks post-treatment) blood samples are collected and analysed for HIV viral load, CD4+ T cell count, distinctive Th1 and Th2 cytokines, circulating filarial antigens (CFA), micronutrient status, antioxidant enzymes and markers of oxidative stress. After 12 weeks the study participants get the opposite treatment and post-treatment blood samples aree collected four times with the same intervals as above.

If treatment of coexisting helminth infections, including lymphatic filariasis, delays the progression of HIV, such treatment may be an important measure to alleviate the effect of the AIDS epidemic in Africa and other areas where HIV and helminths coexist. For lymphatic filariasis in particular such information will be of high significance in the strategic planning by decision-makers within the ongoing international efforts for control of lymphatic filariasis.

Study Type  ICMJE Interventional
Study Phase  ICMJE Not Applicable
Study Design  ICMJE Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: Double
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Condition  ICMJE
  • HIV Infection
  • Lymphatic Filariasis
Intervention  ICMJE Drug: Diethylcarbamazine
Study Arms  ICMJE Not Provided
Publications * Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status  ICMJE Completed
Enrollment  ICMJE Not Provided
Original Enrollment  ICMJE Not Provided
Study Completion Date  ICMJE November 2002
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Eligibility Criteria  ICMJE

Inclusion Criteria:

One of the three following conditions:

  1. Positivity for antibodies to HIV-1 or HIV-2
  2. Positivity for circulating filarial antigen from W. bancrofti
  3. Positivity for both HIV antibodies and W.bancrofti circulating antigens

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. AIDS
  2. Hydrocele
  3. Lymphoedema
  4. Elephantiasis
Sex/Gender  ICMJE
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages  ICMJE 18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Accepts Healthy Volunteers  ICMJE No
Contacts  ICMJE Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries  ICMJE Not Provided
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number  ICMJE NCT00295698
Other Study ID Numbers  ICMJE RUF 91088
Has Data Monitoring Committee Not Provided
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement  ICMJE Not Provided
Responsible Party Not Provided
Study Sponsor  ICMJE DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development
Collaborators  ICMJE
  • Danish Council for Development Research
  • The AIDS Foundation, Denmark
  • The Wedell-Wedellsborg Foundation, Denmark
Investigators  ICMJE
Principal Investigator: Nina O Nielsen, Ms.c DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development
PRS Account DBL -Institute for Health Research and Development
Verification Date February 2006

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP