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The Incidence and Treatment of Insulin Resistance Among Men With Erectile Dysfunction

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00284960
First Posted: February 1, 2006
Last Update Posted: August 3, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
January 31, 2006
February 1, 2006
August 3, 2017
June 2005
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00284960 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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The Incidence and Treatment of Insulin Resistance Among Men With Erectile Dysfunction
The Incidence and Treatment of Insulin Resistance Among Men With Erectile Dysfunction
Determine if men with erectile dysfunction (ED) are more likely to have insulin resistance compared to healthy controls.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the body that lets sugar into the cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin resistance occurs when the body's cells have a decreased ability to react to insulin. This leads to an increase in insulin secretion. Over time, insulin resistance can lead to higher levels of sugar in the blood (diabetes), and can also contribute to obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and heart disease. There are no simple tests to actually diagnose insulin resistance. Currently, the glucose tolerance test is used to diagnose IR, but it involves several blood draws over a 2-hour period. Another purpose of this study is to compare a blood test involving only one blood draw to the 2-hour glucose tolerance test, which involves several blood draws over a 2-hour period.

It is well known that diabetes often leads to erectile dysfunction. Because insulin resistance occurs before diabetes, it is possible that erectile dysfunction may occur in some individuals while they have insulin resistance, but before they develop diabetes. If this is true, it might be possible to use erectile dysfunction as a sign of insulin resistance, which may lead to more timely treatment of insulin resistance and may delay or prevent the development of diabetes, and the other problems mentioned above.

Observational
Time Perspective: Prospective
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  • Erectile Dysfunction
  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Insulin Resistance
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
30
March 2007
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18-65 years of age, male,

Exclusion Criteria:

  • diabetes, peyronies
Sexes Eligible for Study: Male
18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00284960
18805
NIH: K24 H001476
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Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
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Principal Investigator: J C Trussell, MD
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
August 2017