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Improvement in Baroreflex Sensitivity in OSAS

The recruitment status of this study is unknown. The completion date has passed and the status has not been verified in more than two years.
Verified May 2005 by Nagoya University.
Recruitment status was:  Recruiting
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00284037
First Posted: January 31, 2006
Last Update Posted: January 31, 2006
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
Nagoya University
January 27, 2006
January 31, 2006
January 31, 2006
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No Changes Posted
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Improvement in Baroreflex Sensitivity in OSAS
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Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The effect of long-term nocturnal therapy with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on daytime baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), a predictor of cardiac death, was investigated in OSAS patients.
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Interventional
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Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome
Device: continuous positive airway pressure therapy
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Unknown status
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Inclusion Criteria:

  • obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

Exclusion Criteria:

  • diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive lung disease, coronary or valvular heart disease, congestive heart failure, renal failure, or endocrine dysfunction. Moreover, none of them were taking b-blockers, vasodilators, or inotropic agents at the time of enrollment in the study.
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
20 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Senior)
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Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Japan
 
 
NCT00284037
NU-06-A-0003
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Nagoya University
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Study Chair: Mitsuhiro Yokota, MD.PhD Department of Cardiovascular Genome Science, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
Nagoya University
May 2005

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP