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Chronic Gastrointestinal Sequelae of an Acute Outbreak of Bacterial Gastroenteritis in Walkerton Ontario

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00235326
First Posted: October 10, 2005
Last Update Posted: July 29, 2009
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
McMaster University
October 6, 2005
October 10, 2005
February 5, 2009
April 22, 2009
July 29, 2009
January 2002
August 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Number of Participants With Post Infectious Irritable Bowel Syndrome [ Time Frame: 8 years ]
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00235326 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Chronic Gastrointestinal Sequelae of an Acute Outbreak of Bacterial Gastroenteritis in Walkerton Ontario
Chronic Gastrointestinal Sequelae of an Acute Outbreak of Bacterial Gastroenteritis in Walkerton Ontario
Acute Bacterial dysentery leads to chronic symptoms of disturbed bowel habit in a minority of individuals. This condition known as post infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) remains poorly understood. This could allow material in the bowel to reach deeper tissues of the bowel wall leading to inflammation and changes in muscle and nerve function. This is also early evidence that genetic programming of people with PI-IBS prevents them from turning off inflammation once it begins. Literature suggests that IBS may develop at greater rates in individuals with pro-inflammatory genotype and that these individuals may be at increased risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).
This research will study chronic gastrointestinal problems in the residents of Walkerton, Ontario region. Determine whether acute bacterial infection is a risk factor for development of inflammatory bowel disease using the population of Walkerton as a cohort. We hypothesize that exposure to bacterial infection leads to development of post infectious irritable bowel syndrome which is associated with an increase in intestinal permeability and immune activation with low grade intestinal inflammation and that this sequence of events will trigger inflammatory bowel disease in genetically susceptible individuals
Observational
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Prospective
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Non-Probability Sample
residents of walkerton
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
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  • 2
    Unexposed to gastroenteritis
  • 1
    Exposed to gastroenteritis
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
4561
August 2008
August 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants must be residents of the Walkerton, Ontario region at the time of Outbreak who consented to the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Non residents of Walkerton Ontario at the time of outbreak
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
16 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Senior)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Canada
 
 
NCT00235326
02-026; 05-346
No
Not Provided
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John Marshall, Mcmaster University
McMaster University
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: John k Marshall, MD, MSc McMaster University
McMaster University
March 2009