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Progesterone for the Treatment of Cocaine Dependence - 1

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00218257
First Posted: September 22, 2005
Last Update Posted: November 17, 2015
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
September 16, 2005
September 22, 2005
November 17, 2015
July 2002
April 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
1. The number of self-administered cocaine deliveries at each dose of cocaine (0.4 mg/kg or placebo) as a function of treatment with progesterone at 3 doses. 2. Subjective effects of cocaine as measured by cocaine effects questionnaire [ Time Frame: 1. Subjects could receive up to 5 doses of cocaine during each session. 2. The CEQ was given approximately every 5 minutes during each 3 hour session ]
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00218257 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
heart rate and blood pressure and plasma cocaine levels [ Time Frame: physiological monitoring every 2-5 minutes; cocaine levels baseline, +10 minutes ]
Not Provided
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Progesterone for the Treatment of Cocaine Dependence - 1
Interactions Between Progesterone and Cocaine in Women
Past research has demonstrated that cocaine dependent women experience less severe responses to cocaine during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, when estrogen and progesterone concentrations are high. The purpose of this study is to determine whether administered progesterone reduces subjective and physiological responses to cocaine in cocaine dependent individuals.

Changes in ovarian hormones across the menstrual cycle impact responses to cocaine in women. Studies have shown that cocaine's effects are dampened during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, when estrogen and progesterone concentrations are high, relative to the other phases of the cycle, when concentrations of these hormones are relatively low. The purpose of this study is to determine whether progesterone reduces subjective and physiological responses to cocaine in cocaine dependent individuals. In addition, this study will help to advance the possibility of hormonal progesterone and pharmacologically related drugs as potential treatment components for cocaine abuse.

Participants will undergo two 4-day inpatient periods, totaling 8 days of treatment. For women, the inpatient periods will occur during two consecutive menstrual cycles; for men, they will occur during two consecutive months. On Day 1, participants will receive a first dose of either progesterone or placebo. On Day 2, participants will receive a second and third dose of study medication. They will also participate in an adaptation session, which will familiarize the participant with the smoking equipment that will be used the following day. On Day 3, participants will receive a fourth dose of medication 2 hours prior to a smoking lab session. Prior to beginning the smoking lab session, participants will be asked to rate their current cocaine craving, anxiety level, appetite, and premenstrual symptoms. Participants will then be given a sample of the cocaine dose for the given day. During the smoking lab session, participants will be asked additional cocaine craving questions at pre-determined intervals and will be given the option to trade in previously earned tokens for either money or a dose of cocaine. Following completion of the smoking lab session, participants will receive their fifth dose of medication.

Interventional
Not Provided
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Triple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Cocaine Abuse
  • Cocaine-Related Disorders
  • Drug: Progesterone
    200mg progesterone BID
    Other Name: prometrium
  • Other: placebo
  • Active Comparator: Progesterone
    200mg progesterone BID
    Intervention: Drug: Progesterone
  • Placebo Comparator: placebo
    Placebo BID
    Intervention: Other: placebo
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
36
April 2008
April 2008   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Smoked at least 1 gram of cocaine each week for the 6 months prior to study entry
  • Agrees to use an adequate method of contraception for the duration of the study
  • If female, current regular menses

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Major psychiatric illnesses, including psychotic mood and anxiety disorders
  • Current dependence on alcohol or drugs other that cocaine or nicotine
  • History of major medical illnesses, including liver disease, abnormal vaginal bleeding, suspected or known breast cancer, thrombophlebitis, or other medical conditions
  • Current use of oral contraceptives or other types of hormonal contraceptives
  • Amenorrhea
  • Currently on parole or probation
  • Received treatment for chemical dependency within the 6 months prior to study entry
  • Known allergy to progesterone or peanuts
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 46 Years   (Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00218257
NIDA-14573-1
R01DA014573 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
DPMC ( Other Identifier: NIDA )
Yes
Not Provided
Not Provided
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Principal Investigator: Sheila M. Specker, MD University of Minnesota, MN
University of Minnesota - Clinical and Translational Science Institute
November 2015

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP