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Biomagnetic Signals of Intestinal Ischemia II (SQUID)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00179036
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : September 15, 2005
Last Update Posted : April 7, 2017
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Alan Bradshaw, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

September 13, 2005
September 15, 2005
April 7, 2017
January 2000
December 2015   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
To observe a difference in the magnetic activity between the normal and diseased smooth muscle of the small intestine [ Time Frame: 2010 ]
To observe a difference in the magnetic activity between the normal and diseased smooth muscle of the small intestine
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00179036 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Create mathematical and computer models of electrical activity of smooth muscle [ Time Frame: 2010 ]
To diagnose mesenteric ischemia without surgery
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Biomagnetic Signals of Intestinal Ischemia II
Biomagnetic Signals of Intestinal Ischemia II
The lack of blood flow to the small intestine causes mesenteric ischemia. Using a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) which measures the magnetic field of the small intestine, we are hoping to identify abnormalities without surgical intervention.
The electrical activity of the small intestine may contain important information that will help us diagnose gastrointestinal diseases. The major impediment to reducing mortality of mesenteric ischemia is the lack of a noninvasive diagnostic test that identifies the syndrome before extensive necrosis occurs. Mesenteric ischemia is caused by the lack of blood flow to the intestine. The Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) measures the magnetic field of the intestinal smooth muscle. By comparing normal smooth muscle and that of patients with mesenteric ischemia, the investigators hope to identify abnormal disease states without surgery.
Observational
Observational Model: Case-Control
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Not Provided
Not Provided
Non-Probability Sample
primary care clinic
Ischemia
Not Provided
  • Good blood flow
    Group without any ischemia to the small intestine
  • Poor blood flow
    Group with partial ischemia to the small intestine
Somarajan S, Muszynski ND, Cheng LK, Bradshaw LA, Naslund TC, Richards WO. Noninvasive biomagnetic detection of intestinal slow wave dysrhythmias in chronic mesenteric ischemia. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2015 Jul 1;309(1):G52-8. doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00466.2014. Epub 2015 Apr 30.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
17
60
December 2015
December 2015   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Normal subjects and those with diagnosed mesenteric ischemia

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Subjects who report a tendency toward claustrophobia
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00179036
060426
R01DK058197 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
No
Not Provided
Not Provided
Alan Bradshaw, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Principal Investigator: William O. Richards, MD Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
April 2017