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Exogenous Reinfection of Tuberculosis in Taiwan

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
National Taiwan University Hospital
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00173433
First received: September 12, 2005
Last updated: December 8, 2014
Last verified: December 2014

September 12, 2005
December 8, 2014
August 2005
July 2006   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
relapse due to reinfection [ Time Frame: 6 years ] [ Designated as safety issue: No ]
proportion of patients with exogenous reinfection in those with relapse of TB
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00173433 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Exogenous Reinfection of Tuberculosis in Taiwan
The Importance of Exogenous Reinfection in the Tuberculosis Endemic of Taiwan
we hypothesize that exogenous reinfection is very important in the Taiwan endemic. Therefore, we design a series of studies to evaluate the individual contribution of exogenous reinfection and endogenous reactivation in the Taiwan endemic, and to realize the impact of exogenous reinfection. First, we will identify the patients with TB relapse after complete treatment. The M. tuberculosis isolates responsible for their initial and recurrent episodes will then be genotyped to clarify the percentage of exogenous reinfection and endogenous reinfection.
Tuberculosis (TB) remains the most important infectious disease in the world. In Taiwan, the incidence of TB increased in recent years. The failure of control implies the necessity to reevaluate the epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It is widely thought that most cases of TB are caused by reactivation of a latent infection. Treatment programs have therefore focused on cure rates rather than tracking of additional cases. But recent studies showed that exogenous reinfection plays an important role in the development of TB. In addition, it seems that the higher the local incidence, the more important exogenous reinfection is. The question of exogenous reinfection versus endogenous reactivation has an impact on the distribution of resources for the prevention and treatment of TB. Based on these evidences, we hypothesize that exogenous reinfection is very important in the Taiwan endemic. Therefore, we design a series of studies to evaluate the individual contribution of exogenous reinfection and endogenous reactivation in the Taiwan endemic, and to realize the impact of exogenous reinfection. First, we will identify the patients with TB relapse after complete treatment. The M. tuberculosis isolates responsible for their initial and recurrent episodes will then be genotyped to clarify the percentage of exogenous reinfection and endogenous reinfection.
Observational
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Tuberculosis
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Culture-confirmed relapse of TB
Patients who have a recurrent episode of culture-confirmed TB after completion of treatment for the first episode of culture-confirmed TB

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
150
July 2006
July 2006   (final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • culture-proven tuberculosis with recurrence
Both
Child, Adult, Senior
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Taiwan
 
NCT00173433
9461700627
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National Taiwan University Hospital
National Taiwan University Hospital
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Principal Investigator: Jann-Yuan Wang, MD National Taiwan University Hospital
National Taiwan University Hospital
December 2014

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP