ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu
Trial record 9 of 293 for:    complementary and alternative medicine

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Low-Income African American and Caucasian Adults With Asthma

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00094419
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : October 19, 2004
Last Update Posted : August 12, 2008
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)

October 18, 2004
October 19, 2004
August 12, 2008
November 2004
June 2006   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)
Not Provided
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00094419 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Low-Income African American and Caucasian Adults With Asthma
The Role of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), Folk Care and Faith-Based Approaches in the Home Management of Persistent Asthma in Low-Income African American and Caucasian Adults
The purpose of this study is to identify the types of and frequency of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) strategies among low-income Caucasian and African American adults with persistent asthma. The overall goal is to collect data that will increase understanding of health beliefs and behaviors in people with low-income backgrounds so that studies can be created that may help modify and improve patients' symptoms of asthma.

The rates of asthma-related deaths and disease are disproportionately high among African Americans compared to Caucasians. Surveys indicate that middle- and upper-income Caucasians use more CAM than African Americans, but the therapies utilized are different. This study will determine how well people with persistent asthma adhere to their treatment and whether the type and frequency of use of CAM affects treatment adherence.

Participants will begin this study by taking part in an interview about adherence to their current inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) regimen and their personal CAM use. After completing the interview, participant adherence to their ICS regimen will be monitored for 6 weeks. Depending on the type of ICS participants are taking, monitoring will be conducted either by participant self-reporting or electronic monitors that record the time and date of medication inhalation. Participant adherence will also be assessed at study completion.

Observational
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Asthma
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
50
Same as current
June 2006
June 2006   (Final data collection date for primary outcome measure)

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Physician-diagnosed asthma with episodes that last for long periods of time
  • Medicaid recipients
  • Self-identify as African American or Caucasian
  • Daily use of inhaled corticosteroids
  • Able to speak English
  • Have mental capacity to understand and participate in the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Prisoners
  • History of smoking at least ten packs of cigarettes per year
  • Currently smoke more than one and a half packs of cigarettes per week
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
21 Years to 50 Years   (Adult)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00094419
F32AT002012-01( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
Yes
Not Provided
Not Provided
Maureen George, Principal Investigator, Johns Hopkins School of Nursing
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
Not Provided
Principal Investigator: Maureen George, PhD RN AE-C Johns Hopkins Medical Institute
National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)
August 2008