We are updating the design of this site. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

Study of Megakaryocytes From Patients With Abnormal Platelet Vesicles

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00086476
First Posted: July 2, 2004
Last Update Posted: July 2, 2017
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
July 1, 2004
July 2, 2004
July 2, 2017
June 29, 2004
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00086476 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
Study of Megakaryocytes From Patients With Abnormal Platelet Vesicles
Investigations of Megakaryocytes From Patients With Abnormal Platelet Vesicles
Congenital bleeding disorders characterized by abnormal platelet granules include Gray Platelet syndrome (GPS; defective alpha-granules), Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS; defective delta-granules), and combined alpha delta-storage pool deficiency (alpha delta-SPD). Other diseases associated with variable defects in platelet gamma-granules include Chediak-Higashi, Griscelli, Wiskott-Aldrich, and Thrombocytopenia Absent Radius syndromes. These disorders are models for the study of organelle formation in megakaryocytes and platelets. Characteristics of megakaryocytopoiesis in these disorders have not been investigated because megakaryocytes could not be cultured from patients in sufficient quantities for experimental purposes. Recent advances have made it possible to culture megakaryocytes using serum-free media supplemented with recombinant human thrombopoietin (TPO). Such cultured human megakaryocytes, amplified from bone marrow-derived CD34+ stem cells, synthesize and store organellar proteins and produce functional platelets. In this protocol, we plan to obtain bone marrow aspirates from 40 children and adults (ages 2 to 80 years) with GPS, HPS, and related disorders. Patients admitted to the NIH Clinical Center on specific disease-related protocols will be enrolled in this protocol during their routine 3-5 day visits. We will culture megakaryocytes from CD34+ stem cells isolated from bone marrow aspirates. Studies of cultured megakaryocytes will include evaluation of granule membrane and soluble proteins using fluorescent antibodies and immunoelectron microscopy and comparison of RNA and protein expression patterns between normal and patient cells. Precautions will be taken to prevent the primary risk of the bone marrow aspiration, i.e., prolonged bleeding at the aspiration site. Standard diagnostic studies on the bone marrow sample may reveal information that may directly benefit patients. However, the broader benefit of this study is the acquisition of a better understanding of the characteristics of functional platelet disorders and the process of intracellular vesicle formation.
Congenital bleeding disorders characterized by abnormal platelet granules include Gray Platelet syndrome (GPS; defective alpha-granules), Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS; defective delta-granules), and combined alpha delta-storage pool deficiency (alpha delta-SPD). Other diseases associated with variable defects in platelet gamma-granules include Chediak-Higashi, Griscelli, Wiskott-Aldrich, and Thrombocytopenia Absent Radius syndromes. These disorders are models for the study of organelle formation in megakaryocytes and platelets. Characteristics of megakaryocytopoiesis in these disorders have not been investigated because megakaryocytes could not be cultured from patients in sufficient quantities for experimental purposes. Recent advances have made it possible to culture megakaryocytes using serum-free media supplemented with recombinant human thrombopoietin (TPO). Such cultured human megakaryocytes, amplified from bone marrow-derived CD34+ stem cells, synthesize and store organellar proteins and produce functional platelets. In this protocol, we plan to obtain bone marrow aspirates from 40 children and adults (ages 2 to 80 years) with GPS, HPS, and related disorders. Patients admitted to the NIH Clinical Center on specific disease-related protocols will be enrolled in this protocol during their routine 3-5 day visits. We will culture megakaryocytes from CD34+ stem cells isolated from bone marrow aspirates. Studies of cultured megakaryocytes will include evaluation of granule membrane and soluble proteins using fluorescent antibodies and immunoelectron microscopy and comparison of RNA and protein expression patterns between normal and patient cells. Precautions will be taken to prevent the primary risk of the bone marrow aspiration, i.e., prolonged bleeding at the aspiration site. Standard diagnostic studies on the bone marrow sample may reveal information that may directly benefit patients. However, the broader benefit of this study is the acquisition of a better understanding of the characteristics of functional platelet disorders and the process of intracellular vesicle formation.
Observational
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Blood Coagulation Disorders
Not Provided
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
3
June 13, 2011
Not Provided
  • INCLUSION CRITERIA:

This protocol will include children and adults with a clinical diagnosis of GPS, HPS, isolated delta-SPD, combined alpha delta-SPD, Griscelli disease, Chediak Higashi syndrome, Wiskott Aldrich syndrome or Thrombocytopenia absent radius syndrome. Patients whose platelets exhibit abnormal intracellular vesicle morphology will also be eligible.

EXCLUSION CRITERIA:

Patients younger than 2 years and older than 80 years will be excluded. Patients with severe thrombocytopenia (fewer than 20 times 10(12) platelets/L) will be excluded.

Sexes Eligible for Study: All
2 Years to 80 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00086476
040226
04-HG-0226
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Not Provided
Not Provided
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
June 13, 2011