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Evaluating "Health at Every Size"(HAES) as an Alternative Obesity Treatment Model

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00074633
First Posted: December 19, 2003
Last Update Posted: January 13, 2010
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborators:
University of California, Davis
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Information provided by:
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
December 17, 2003
December 19, 2003
January 13, 2010
January 2000
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00074633 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Evaluating "Health at Every Size"(HAES) as an Alternative Obesity Treatment Model
Evaluating "Health at Every Size"(HAES) as an Alternative Obesity Treatment Model

Increasingly more individuals are trying to lose weight. Indeed, many women, regardless of their size, experience a life-long battle and preoccupation with their weight. Despite the attention to weight and the increase in diet behavior, the incidence of obesity continues to rise. There is little data to show improved long term success for the majority of participants who engage in weight loss behaviors.

The specific aim is to improve the psychological and metabolic health of obese women with a history of chronic dieting through encouraging "Health at Every Size" (HAES). This treatment model emphasizes "intutitive eating," i.e., internal regulation of eating (responding to cues of hunger, appetite and satiety). The HAES model is being compared to the current standard of care in obesity treatment, energy restriction dieting, which encourages cognitive control of eating and weight reduction.

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Interventional
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Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Hypertension
  • Depression
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
  • Behavioral: Health at Every Size (HAES)
  • Behavioral: Diet (Traditional, moderate energy restriction)
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Bacon L, Keim NL, Van Loan MD, Derricote M, Gale B, Kazaks A, Stern JS. Evaluating a 'non-diet' wellness intervention for improvement of metabolic fitness, psychological well-being and eating and activity behaviors. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jun;26(6):854-65.

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
79
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  • Caucasian;
  • female;
  • age 30-45 years;
  • Body Mass Index (BMI)>30 m/kg2;
  • non-smoker;
  • not pregnant or lactating;
  • Restraint Scale (Herman and Polivy, 1988) score >15, indicating a history of chronic dieting;
  • no recent myocardial infarction;
  • no active neoplasms, Type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent Type 2 diabetes, nor history of cerebrovascular or renal disease.
Sexes Eligible for Study: Female
30 Years to 45 Years   (Adult)
Yes
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
United States
 
 
NCT00074633
OBFRETTO (completed)
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National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
  • University of California, Davis
  • United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
Not Provided
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
January 2010

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP