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Genetic Epidemiology of Sarcoidosis

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005531
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: February 18, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
May 25, 2000
May 26, 2000
February 18, 2016
December 1996
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00005531 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Genetic Epidemiology of Sarcoidosis
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To determine if hereditary susceptibility predisposes African Americans to sarcoidosis and to identify sarcoidosis susceptibility genes in African Americans.

BACKGROUND:

Sarcoidosis is a multisystem, granulomatous inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Hereditary susceptibility to sarcoidosis is suggested by reports of familial clustering and a higher prevalence in certain ethnic groups, particularly African-Americans. Over four hundred kindreds been reported in the medical literature and these investigators have recently described 101 families and shown that African Americans have a higher prevalence rate of familial sarcoidosis than Caucasians (19 percent vs. 5 percent). The reasons why sarcoidosis clusters in families or the role of genetic factors in this disease are not known.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

The study was carried out in African American families ascertained through 400 African American sarcoidosis patients evaluated at the Henry Ford Health System. They were tested for association of sarcoidosis with markers for candidate genes using the affected family-based control method and tested for possible environmental risk factors and genetic mechanisms of disease transmission by performing a segregation analysis in African American families.

A strong association of one or more of the candidate genes with sarcoidosis or an indication of major gene segregation for the disease, provided the basis for future linkage studies. Investigating the hereditary susceptibility of sarcoidosis was best done in African Americans, because of the greater severity and occurrence of disease in this population. Once the reasons for familial aggregation of sarcoidosis are determined, the etiology of this disease will be better understood and it should be possible to design new approaches to prevention and treatment.

The study completion date listed in this record was obtained from the "End Date" entered in the Protocol Registration and Results System (PRS) recor

Observational
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  • Lung Diseases
  • Sarcoidosis
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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November 2000
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No eligibility criteria
Sexes Eligible for Study: Male
up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
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Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT00005531
5064
R01HL054306 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
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Investigator: Michael Iannuzzi Case Western Reserve University
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
August 2004