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Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Hypertension

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00005149
First Posted: May 26, 2000
Last Update Posted: January 21, 2016
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Collaborator:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Information provided by:
University of Utah
May 25, 2000
May 26, 2000
January 21, 2016
February 1980
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Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00005149 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
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Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Hypertension
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To determine the pathophysiology of different types of essential hypertension by identifying the discrete effects of major genes and environmental variables as determinants of the subtypes of essential hypertension.

BACKGROUND:

Essential hypertension is believed to be a heterogeneous group of disorders, the subtypes of which could be related to sodium sensitivity, obesity, diabetes, calcium intake and metabolism, the renin-angiotensin balance, or membrane cation transport. Essential hypertension aggregates in families. The syndromes leading to hypertension may involve shared genes, shared environmental factors, or both.

DESIGN NARRATIVE:

In 1980 a series of biochemical and physiological tests were initiated in the 2,548 persons in 98 extended pedigrees in Utah. Most of the subjects were obtained from three major pedigree types: stroke cluster pedigrees; coronary heart disease cluster pedigrees; and pedigrees of Utah Hypertension Detection and Follow-up Program high blood pressure probands. Data were collected on personal history, medical family history and genealogy, anthropometrics, standard and 32-lead electro- cardiograms, multiple blood pressure measurements during sitting, standing, lying, tilting, isometric hand grip exercise, bicycle exercise, venipuncture and mental arithmetic. Cation tests included sodium-lithium countertransport, lithium-potassium co-transport, intracellular sodium, potassium, magnesium, sodium-potassium ATP-ase pump activity and binding sites and plasma levels of sodium, potassium, magnesium, ionized calcium and digoxin-like pump inhibitor. Information was also collected on stress, exercise, plasma renin activity, and urinary kallikrein. Statistical and pedigree analysis were conducted.

The same tests were also performed on 600 new population-based hypertensive subjects on drug therapy and again four months after interruption of drug therapy. Tests were conduced for specific subtypes of high blood pressure among the 600 subjects using individual variables and multivariate combinations of variables. Three hundred nuclear families were screened to test for familiality of subtype indicators and to identify those high blood pressure subtype indicator variables needing detailed pedigree analysis.

One thousand sequentially-sampled persons were studied for major genes, DNA probe linkage, and gene-environment interactions as determinants of specific types of hypertension.

Observational
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  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Heart Diseases
  • Hypertension
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*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
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November 1992
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No eligibility criteria
Sexes Eligible for Study: Male
up to 100 Years   (Child, Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
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NCT00005149
1020
R01HL024855 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
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University of Utah
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
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University of Utah
January 2016