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Mapping the Areas of the Brain Associated With Language in Children With Epilepsy

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00001366
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : November 4, 1999
Last Update Posted : March 4, 2008
Sponsor:
Information provided by:
National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)

Tracking Information
First Submitted Date November 3, 1999
First Posted Date November 4, 1999
Last Update Posted Date March 4, 2008
Study Start Date August 1993
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Current Primary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Primary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Change History Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00001366 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Current Secondary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Secondary Outcome Measures Not Provided
Current Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
Original Other Pre-specified Outcome Measures Not Provided
 
Descriptive Information
Brief Title Mapping the Areas of the Brain Associated With Language in Children With Epilepsy
Official Title MRI-Based Functional Language Mapping in Children With Epilepsy
Brief Summary

Researchers are interested in studying if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is practical for locating the areas of the brain associated with language in children with epilepsy.

When a region of the brain is active, it uses more fuel in the form of oxygen and sugar (glucose). As the brain uses more fuel it produces more waste products, carbon dioxide and water. Blood carries fuel to the brain and waste products away from the brain. As brain activity increases blood flow to and from the area of activity increases also.

Patients participating in the study will be asked to perform tasks designed to test language skills while undergoing an MRI to detect areas of the brain using oxygen and receiving blood flow.

Detailed Description We propose to study the feasibility of utilizing MRI to perform functional mapping of language cortex in children with epilepsy. We will use 1.5 Tesla MRI to study cerebral blood flow and tissue oxygenation during cognitive activation tasks derived from previous adult studies.
Study Type Observational
Study Design Not Provided
Target Follow-Up Duration Not Provided
Biospecimen Not Provided
Sampling Method Not Provided
Study Population Not Provided
Condition
  • Epilepsy
  • Seizures
Intervention Not Provided
Study Groups/Cohorts Not Provided
Publications *

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Recruitment Information
Recruitment Status Completed
Enrollment
 (submitted: June¬†23,¬†2005)
230
Original Enrollment Same as current
Study Completion Date September 2002
Primary Completion Date Not Provided
Eligibility Criteria

Children aged 5-17 years.

Partial epilepsy (localized).

Ability to cooperate with task paradigms (IQ greater than 65).

No cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants, shrapnel, vascular clips, braces, or claustrophobia.

No one with inability to cooperate with task paradigms.

Sex/Gender
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
Ages Child, Adult, Older Adult
Accepts Healthy Volunteers Yes
Contacts Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Listed Location Countries United States
Removed Location Countries  
 
Administrative Information
NCT Number NCT00001366
Other Study ID Numbers 930191
93-N-0191
Has Data Monitoring Committee Not Provided
U.S. FDA-regulated Product Not Provided
IPD Sharing Statement Not Provided
Responsible Party Not Provided
Study Sponsor National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Collaborators Not Provided
Investigators Not Provided
PRS Account National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (CC)
Verification Date September 2002