We are updating the design of this site. Learn more.
Show more
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu

A Randomized, Comparative Study of Daily Dapsone and Daily Atovaquone for Prophylaxis Against PCP in HIV-Infected Patients Who Are Intolerant of Trimethoprim and/or Sulfonamides

This study has been completed.
Sponsor:
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier:
NCT00000802
First Posted: August 31, 2001
Last Update Posted: March 17, 2014
The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
Information provided by:
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
November 2, 1999
August 31, 2001
March 17, 2014
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Complete list of historical versions of study NCT00000802 on ClinicalTrials.gov Archive Site
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
 
A Randomized, Comparative Study of Daily Dapsone and Daily Atovaquone for Prophylaxis Against PCP in HIV-Infected Patients Who Are Intolerant of Trimethoprim and/or Sulfonamides
A Randomized, Comparative Study of Daily Dapsone and Daily Atovaquone for Prophylaxis Against PCP in HIV-Infected Patients Who Are Intolerant of Trimethoprim and/or Sulfonamides

To compare the efficacy and safety of dapsone versus atovaquone in preventing or delaying the onset of histologically proven or probable Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts <= 200 cells/mm3 or <= 15 percent of the total lymphocyte count who are intolerant to trimethoprim and/or sulfonamides.

Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), which is effective for secondary PCP prophylaxis, is associated with allergic manifestations and side effects that limit its use. Patients who are intolerant of TMP/SMX require an effective alternative. Dapsone and atovaquone have both shown promise as PCP prophylactic agents.

Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), which is effective for secondary PCP prophylaxis, is associated with allergic manifestations and side effects that limit its use. Patients who are intolerant of TMP/SMX require an effective alternative. Dapsone and atovaquone have both shown promise as PCP prophylactic agents.

Patients are randomized to receive either dapsone or atovaquone daily, with follow-up at the clinic every 4 months.

Interventional
Phase 3
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Primary Purpose: Treatment
  • Pneumonia, Pneumocystis Carinii
  • HIV Infections
  • Drug: Atovaquone
  • Drug: Dapsone
Not Provided

*   Includes publications given by the data provider as well as publications identified by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number) in Medline.
 
Completed
700
July 1997
Not Provided

Inclusion Criteria

Concurrent Medication: Strongly recommended:

  • Pyrimethamine (50 mg) and folinic acid (15 mg) weekly in patients receiving dapsone who have CD4 count < 100 cells/mm3 and are toxoplasmosis seropositive.

Patients must have:

  • Working diagnosis of HIV infection.
  • CD4 count <= 200 cells/mm3 or <= 15 percent of total lymphocyte count at any time in the past OR a history of PCP.
  • History of intolerance of trimethoprim and/or sulfonamides that required permanent discontinuation.

NOTE:

  • Pregnant patients are eligible at the clinician's discretion.

Prior Medication:

Allowed:

  • Prior PCP prophylaxis.

Exclusion Criteria

Co-existing Condition:

Patients with the following symptoms or conditions are excluded:

  • Active pneumocystosis.

Concurrent Medication:

Excluded:

  • PCP prophylaxis (other than study drug) or any medication with potential anti-PCP activity.

Patients with the following prior conditions are excluded:

  • Known treatment-limiting reaction to dapsone or atovaquone.
Sexes Eligible for Study: All
13 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Senior)
No
Contact information is only displayed when the study is recruiting subjects
Tanzania,   United States
 
 
NCT00000802
ACTG 277
CPCRA 034
11253 ( Registry Identifier: DAIDS-ES )
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
Not Provided
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Not Provided
Study Chair: El-Sadr W
Study Chair: Luskin-Hawk R
Study Chair: Murphy R
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
April 2012

ICMJE     Data element required by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors and the World Health Organization ICTRP