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Efficacy of Venetoclax in Combination With Rituximab in Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia (VIWA-1)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05099471
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : October 29, 2021
Last Update Posted : July 28, 2022
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University of Munich
Zentrum für Klinische Studien Ulm
AbbVie
Pfizer
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Christian Buske, University of Ulm

Brief Summary:

In Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) chemotherapy induces only low CR/VGPR rates and response duration is limited. In addition, WM patients are often elderly, partly not tolerating chemotherapy related toxicities. Thus, innovative approaches are needed which combine excellent activity and tolerability in WM. Chemotherapy-free approaches are highly attractive for this patient group. Based on its high activity and favorable toxicity profile in indolent B-NHL such as CLL, Venetoclax was approved for the treatment of this diseases by the FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA). First data in relapsed/refractory WM have documented high activity and low toxicity of Venetoclax also in WM, including patients with prior Ibrutinib treatment or patients carrying CXCR4 mutations. Ibrutinib itself has high activity and a relatively low toxicity profile in WM, but has also major disadvantages: the main disadvantage is the need to apply this drug continuously. Furthermore, Ibrutinib efficacy depends largely on the genotype with a substantial drop in major responses and PFS in the presence of CXCR4 mutations and non-mutated MYD88. In particular the need of continuous treatment for Ibrutinib has prevented that Ibrutinib has become the standard of care outcompeting conventional Rituximab/chemotherapy. This is reflected in current guidelines such as the NCCN and the ESMO guidelines, which still see immunochemotherapy as a backbone of treatment, largely because of the advantage of a timely fixed application. Data in CLL in the relapsed as well as in the first line setting have convincingly shown that in contrast to Ibrutinib Venetoclax is highly efficient also when used in a timely defined application scheme over 12 months in combination with the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab. Data documented deep responses including molecular responses and a highly significant advantage over immunochemotherapy in large international Phase III trials, changing the standard of care in this disease.

Based on this the hypothesis is that timely fixed application of the combination of Venetoclax and Rituximab induces significantly superior treatment outcomes compared to chemotherapy and Rituximab (DRC) in patients with treatment naïve WM, regardless of the genotype. A confirmation of this assumption in the proposed trial will change the standard of care in WM.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Drug: Venetoclax; Rituximab Drug: DRC Phase 2

Detailed Description:

In Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) chemotherapy induces only low CR/VGPR rates and response duration is limited. In addition, WM patients are often elderly, partly not tolerating chemotherapy related toxicities. Thus, innovative approaches are needed which combine excellent activity and tolerability in WM. Chemotherapy-free approaches are highly attractive for this patient group. Based on its high activity and favorable toxicity profile in indolent B-NHL such as CLL, Venetoclax was approved for the treatment of this diseases by the FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA). First data in relapsed/refractory WM have documented high activity and low toxicity of Venetoclax also in WM, including patients with prior Ibrutinib treatment or patients carrying CXCR4 mutations. Ibrutinib itself has high activity and a relatively low toxicity profile in WM, but has also major disadvantages: the main disadvantage is the need to apply this drug continuously. Furthermore, Ibrutinib efficacy depends largely on the genotype with a substantial drop in major responses and PFS in the presence of CXCR4 mutations and non-mutated MYD88. In particular the need of continuous treatment for Ibrutinib has prevented that Ibrutinib has become the standard of care outcompeting conventional Rituximab/chemotherapy. This is reflected in current guidelines such as the NCCN and the ESMO guidelines, which still see immunochemotherapy as a backbone of treatment, largely because of the advantage of a timely fixed application. Data in CLL in the relapsed as well as in the first line setting have convincingly shown that in contrast to Ibrutinib Venetoclax is highly efficient also when used in a timely defined application scheme over 12 months in combination with the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab. Data documented deep responses including molecular responses and a highly significant advantage over immunochemotherapy in large international Phase III trials, changing the standard of care in this disease.

Based on this the hypothesis is that timely fixed application of the combination of Venetoclax and Rituximab induces significantly superior treatment outcomes compared to chemotherapy and Rituximab (DRC) in patients with treatment naïve WM, regardless of the genotype. A confirmation of this assumption in the proposed trial will change the standard of care in WM.

This study is an International phase II explorative, multicenter, open label, and randomized trial.

The study will consist of an open labeled, stratified 1:1 randomization between Arm A and Arm B for de novo WM patients in need of treatment (phase II). Stratification factors are MYD88 and CXCR4 status (positive vs. negative). A stratified central block randomization will be used. The central randomization service will be used to avoid predictability of the treatment arm.

The primary goal of this study is to explore the efficacy of Venetoclax plus Rituximab versus Dexamethasone/Cyclophosphamide/Rituximab in the treatment of de novo WM patients (Arm A vs. Arm B).

80 patients are planned to be recruited for this study at 30 sites in Germany and France.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 80 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Efficacy of Venetoclax in Combination With Rituximab in Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia
Estimated Study Start Date : September 2022
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2024
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2029


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Venetoclax / Rituximab

Cycle 1 (28-days cycle) Stepwise dose escalation of Venetoclax in all patients with a target dose of 800 mg/d QD PO.

Day 1-7: Venetoclax 200 mg/d QD PO Day 8-14: Venetoclax 400 mg/d QD PO Day 15-28: Venetoclax 800 mg/d QD PO

Cycle 2-12:

Day 1: Rituximab 375 mg/m2 IV Day 1-28: Venetoclax 800 mg/d QD PO

Drug: Venetoclax; Rituximab
Combination of venetoclax and rituximab
Other Name: Venclyxto; Ruxience

Active Comparator: Dexamethasone / Rituximab / Cyclophosphamide

Cycle 1-6:

Day 1: Dexamethasone 20 mg PO Day 1: Rituximab 375 mg/m2 IV Day 1-5: Cyclophosphamide 100 mg/m2 BID PO

Cycle 7-12:

Day 1: Rituximab 375 mg/m2 IV

Drug: DRC
Combination of Dexamethasone / Rituximab / Cyclophosphamide
Other Name: Dexamethasone / Rituximab / Cyclophosphamide




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Rate of CR / VGPR [ Time Frame: 13 months ]
    CR/VGPR 13 months after initiation of treatment


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Response rate [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    response rates (RR: CR, VGPR, PR, MR)

  2. Overall response rate [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Overall response rate (CR, VGPR, PR; MR)

  3. Time to best response [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Best response (at least achieving a MR) is determined in the time interval from randomization to end of follow-up.

  4. Time to first response [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Time to first response is defined as the time from randomization to first response (MR, PR, VGPR or CR).

  5. Time to treatment failure (TTF) [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    TTF is defined as the date of randomization to discontinuation of therapy for any reason including death from any cause, progression, toxicity or add-on of new anti-cancer therapy. Patients alive without progression and relapse will be censored at the latest tumor assessment date.

  6. Response duration (RD) [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Remission duration will be calculated in patients with response (CR, VGPR, PR, MR) from the date of response to the date of progression, relapse or death from any cause. Patients alive without progression and relapse will be censored at the latest tumor assessment date.

  7. Progression Free Survival (PFS) [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    PFS will be calculated from the date of randomization to the following events: the date of progression and the date of death if it occurred earlier. Patients alive without progression and relapse will be censored at the latest tumor assessment date.

  8. Cause specific survival (CSS) [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Cause specific survival is defined as the period from randomization to death from lymphoma or lymphoma related cause (e.g. infections, bleeding, amyloid caused organ failure); death unrelated to WM is considered as a competing event.

  9. Overall survival (OS) [ Time Frame: 6 years ]
    Overall survival is defined as the period from randomization to death from any cause. Patients who have not died until the time of the analysis will be censored at their last contact date.

  10. Safety of participants including number of adverse events according to NCI-CTCAE v5.0, SAEs, laboratory parameters, ECG and vital signs. [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Adverse events according to NCI-CTCAE version 5.0, SAEs, laboratory parameters (hematology, serum chemistry, b2-microglobulin, coagulation, urine analysis, quantitative immunoglobulins, serum free light chain, cold agglutinin test, serum protein electrophoresis, serum immunofixation, Anti-HIV, HBV, HCV), 12-lead ECG (including PR-, QT- and QTc interval), vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure and temperature)

  11. Quality of life assessed by FACT-Lym questionnaire [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Quality of Life will be assessed by the FACT-Lym questionnaire which is a scoring instrument to measure the management of chronic illness in lymphoma patients. A higher score indicates a better quality of life

  12. Comparison of response rates between CXCR4 mutated and CXCR4 wildtype patients [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Response rates of CXCR4 mutated and CXCR4 wildtype patients will be compared.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Proven clinicopathological diagnosis of WM as defined by consensus panel one of the Second International Workshop on WM (IWWM). Histopathology has to be perfomed before randomization within the last 4 months. In addition, pathological specimens have to be sent to the national pathological reference center prior to randomization for the determination of the mutational status of MYD88 and CXCR4 if the mutational status hasn't been determined before. Immunophenotyping will be performed in each center and archived locally. Flow cytometry of bone marrow and blood cells will include at least one double staining and assess the expression of the following antigens: surface immunoglobulin, CD19, CD20, CD5, CD10, CD38 and CD23. Patients are eligible if tumor cells express the following antigens: CD19, CD20, CD38 and if they are negative for CD5, CD10 and CD23 expression. Patients with tumor cells positive for CD5 and/or CD23 and morphologically similar to WM cells may be included after ruling out other low-grade B-cell malignancies.
  • De novo WM independent of the genotype.
  • Patients must have at least one of the following criteria to start study treatment as partly defined by consensus panel criteria from the Seventh IWWM:

    • Recurrent fever, night sweats, weight loss, fatigue (at least one of them).
    • Hyperviscosity.
    • Lymphadenopathy which is either symptomatic or bulky (≥ 5 cm in maximum diameter).
    • Symptomatic hepatomegaly and / or splenomegaly.
    • Symptomatic organomegaly and / or organ or tissue infiltration.
    • Peripheral neuropathy due to WM.
    • Symptomatic cryoglobulinemia.
    • Cold agglutinin anemia.
    • IgM related immune hemolytic anemia and/or thrombocytopenia.
    • Nephropathy related to WM.
    • Amyloidosis related to WM.
    • Hemoglobin ≤ 10 g/dL (patients should not have received red blood cells transfusions for at least 7 days prior to obtaining the screening hemoglobin).
    • Platelet count < 100 x 109/L (caused by bone marrow [BM] infiltration of the lymphoma).
    • Serum monoclonal protein > 5 g/dL, even with no overt clinical symptoms.
    • IgM serum concentration ≥ 5 g/dL.
    • and other WM associated relevant symptoms
  • Subject must be ≥ 18 years of age.
  • Life expectancy > 3 months.
  • World Health Organization (WHO) / ECOG performance status ≤ 2.
  • Left ventricular ejection fraction ≥ 40% as assessed by transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE).
  • Baseline platelet count ≥ 50x109/L, absolute neutrophil count ≥ 0.75x109/L (if not due to BM infiltration by the lymphoma).

    . Adequate hepatic function per local laboratory reference range as follows:

    • Aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) < 3.0 x ULN.
    • Bilirubin ≤1.5 x ULN (unless bilirubin rise is due to Gilbert's syndrome or of non-hepatic origin).
  • Subject must have adequate renal function as demonstrated by a creatinine clearance ≥ 30 mL/min; calculated by the Cockcroft Gault formula or measured by 24 hours urine collection.
  • Females of childbearing potential (FCBP), i.e. fertile, following menarche and until becoming postmenopausal must have negative results for pregnancy test and must agree to use a highly effective method of birth control for the duration of the therapy up to 12 months after end of therapy
  • Men must agree not to father a child for the duration of therapy and 12 months after and must agree to advice their female partner to use a highly effective method of birth control. Males must refrain from sperm donation for the duration of treatment and at least 12 months after the last dose of study medication.
  • Each patient must voluntarily date and sign an informed consent form in the native language of the patient indicating that he or she understands the purpose of and procedures required for the study and are willing to participate in the study. Patients must be willing and able to adhere to the prohibitions and restrictions specified in this protocol.
  • Affiliation to a social security scheme (relevant for France only).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Serious medical or psychiatric illness (especially undergoing treatment) likely to interfere with participation in this clinical study.
  • Subject is known to be positive for HIV.
  • Active severe infection
  • Congenital or acquired severe immunodeficiency not attributed to lymphoma (clinical appearance: recurrent infections, necessity of immunoglobulin substitution therapy, patients after transplantation)
  • Evidence of other clinically significant uncontrolled condition(s) including, but not limited to:

    • Uncontrolled systemic infection (viral, bacterial or fungal).
    • Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection requiring treatment. Note: subjects with serologic evidence of prior vaccination to HBV (i.e. hepatitis B surface (HBs) antigen negative-, anti-HBs antibody positive and anti-hepatitis B core (HBc) antibody negative) or positive anti-HBc antibody from intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) may participate
  • adequate pulmonary function as demonstrated by DLCO ≤ 65% or FEV1 ≤ 65%.
  • Creatinine clearance ≥ 30 mL/min to < 45 ml/min
  • Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus (as indicated by metabolic derangements and / or severe diabetes mellitus related uncontrolled organ complications).
  • Uncontrolled hypertension.
  • Cardiac history of CHF requiring treatment or Ejection Fraction ≤ 50% or chronic stable angina.
  • Unstable angina pectoris, angioplasty, stenting, or myocardial infarction within 6 months prior to start therapy.
  • Clinically significant cardiac arrhythmia that is symptomatic or requires treatment, or asymptomatic sustained ventricular tachycardia.
  • Subject has a cardiovascular disability status of New York Heart Association Class > 2. Class 2 is defined as cardiac disease in which patients are comfortable at rest but ordinary physical activity results in fatigue, palpitations, dyspnea, or anginal pain.
  • History of stroke or intracranial haemorrhage within 6 months prior start of treatment
  • Known pericardial disease.
  • Known interstitial lung disease.
  • Infiltrative pulmonary disease, known pulmonary hypertension.
  • Prior history of malignancies unless the subject has been free of the disease for ≥ 3 years. Exceptions include the following:

    • Basal cell carcinoma of the skin,
    • Squamous cell carcinoma of the skin,
    • Carcinoma in situ of the cervix,
    • Carcinoma in situ of the breast,
    • Incidental histologic finding of prostate cancer (TNM stage of T1a or T1b).
  • Primary amyloidosis.
  • Known cirrhosis (meeting child-pugh stage C).
  • Chemotherapy with approved or investigational anticancer therapeutic within 21 days prior to start of therapy
  • Glucocorticoid therapy within 14 days prior to therapy that exceeds a cumulative dose of 160 mg of dexamethasone or equivalent dose of other corticosteroids given for anti-neoplastic intent.
  • Treatment with any of the following within 7 days prior to the first dose of study drug:

    • moderate or strong cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) inhibitors (such as fluconazole, ketoconazole, and clarithromycin).
    • moderate or strong CYP3A inducers (such as rifampin, carbamazepine, phenytoin, St. John's wort).
  • Contraindication to any of the required concomitant drugs or supportive treatments, including hypersensitivity to antiviral drugs.
  • Autologous stem cell transplant less than 90 days prior to randomization.
  • Allogeneic stem cell transplant less than 100 days prior to randomization.
  • Vaccination with live attenuated vaccines within 4 weeks prior to start of therapy.
  • History or evidence of any other clinically significant disorder, condition or disease (with the exception of those outlined above) that, in the opinion of the investigator or sponsor, if consulted, would pose a risk to subject safely or interfere with the study evaluation, procedures or completion.
  • Women who are pregnant as well as women who are breast-feeding and do not consent to discontinue breast-feeding.
  • Participation in another clinical trial within four weeks before start of therapy in this study.
  • No consent for registration, storage and processing of the individual disease-characteristics.
  • Administration or consumption of any of the following within 3 days prior to the first dose of study drug:

    • grapefruit or grapefruit products.
    • Seville oranges (including marmalade containing Seville oranges).
    • star fruit.
  • Person of legal age who is incapable of comprehending the nature, significance and implications of the clinical trial and of determining his/her will in the light of these facts

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT05099471


Contacts
Layout table for location contacts
Contact: Birgit Schmelzle +49500 ext 65831 studien.gla@uniklinik-ulm.de

Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Ulm
Institute for Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology, University of Munich
Zentrum für Klinische Studien Ulm
AbbVie
Pfizer
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Christian Buske, Prof. Dr. University Hospital Ulm Department of Internal Medicine III
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: Christian Buske, Prof. Dr., University of Ulm
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05099471    
Other Study ID Numbers: VIWA-1
First Posted: October 29, 2021    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 28, 2022
Last Verified: July 2022

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Christian Buske, University of Ulm:
Hematology
Oncology
Venetoclax
Rituximab
DRC
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Layout table for MeSH terms
Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia
Neoplasms, Plasma Cell
Neoplasms by Histologic Type
Neoplasms
Hemostatic Disorders
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
Paraproteinemias
Blood Protein Disorders
Hematologic Diseases
Hemorrhagic Disorders
Lymphoproliferative Disorders
Lymphatic Diseases
Immunoproliferative Disorders
Immune System Diseases
Dexamethasone
Cyclophosphamide
Rituximab
Venetoclax
Immunosuppressive Agents
Immunologic Factors
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Antirheumatic Agents
Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating
Alkylating Agents
Molecular Mechanisms of Pharmacological Action
Antineoplastic Agents
Myeloablative Agonists
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological
Anti-Inflammatory Agents