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Influence of Sex and Training on de Novo Muscle Protein Synthesis (TUT)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04887883
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : May 14, 2021
Last Update Posted : May 14, 2021
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Canada
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Daniel Moore, University of Toronto

Brief Summary:
Acute exercise increases the incorporation of dietary amino acids into de novo myofibrillar proteins after a single meal in controlled laboratory studies in males. It is unclear if this extends to free-living settings or is influenced by training or sex. Over 24 h in a free-living setting, the investigators determined the effect of training status and sex on dietary phenylalanine incorporation into contractile myofibrillar and noncontractile sarcoplasmic proteins after exercise.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Amino Acids Dietary Protein Sex Resistance Exercise Behavioral: Resistance exercise

Detailed Description:

Exogenous (e.g. diet-derived) amino acids increase muscle protein synthesis and provide the building blocks for growth. While traditional infusion studies can measure the synthesis of total mixed muscle or fraction-specific protein synthetic rates, the metabolic fate of dietary amino acids can only be assessed by measuring the incorporation of a labelled amino acid (i.e. L-[1-13C]phenylalanine) into muscle protein through the oral ingestion of a intrinsically labelled food source (e.g. milk protein) . This technique has revealed in controlled laboratory settings that dietary amino acids, and not endogenous amino acids recycled from intracellular protein breakdown, may be preferentially utilized as precursors for muscle and whole body protein synthesis Therefore, it is important to characterize the incorporation of diet-derived amino acids over a 24-h post-exercise recovery period to determine how RE influences their utilization as precursors for the synthesis of new muscle proteins. The investigators are unaware of any studies that have examined the utilization of dietary amino acids for de novo muscle protein synthesis in females, highlighting an urgent need to rectify the sex-disparity in exercise-related research.

Protein requirements during resistance training have been suggested to be highest at training onset with evidence suggesting moderate daily intakes (~1.2-1.4 g·kg·d-1) can support chronic adaptations, although recent suggestions are that slightly higher intakes (~1.6 g·kg·d-1) may optimize lean mass growth. Resistance training is associated with a reduction in whole-body protein turnover but an increased net protein balance suggesting a greater efficiency of whole-body amino acid utilization with training in males , although whether this also extends to females is unknown. Acute RE and chronic training has been reported to increase intracellular amino acid recycling in the fasted state, which would be consistent with an increased amino acid efficiency. To date, however, no study has investigated whether the post-exercise incorporation of dietary amino acids into myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins in a free-living setting is modified by training and/or sex.

The primary aim of the present study was to determine the dietary fate of amino acids into contractile myofibrillar and noncontractile sarcoplasmic muscle proteins after acute RE in the untrained and trained state over 24 h in a free-living setting. The investigators hypothesized that, irrespective of sex, acute RE would increase dietary amino acid incorporation in myofibrillar proteins in the untrained state with training leading to an attenuated increase suggestive of a reduced reliance on dietary amino acids in the trained state.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 20 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Influence of Sex, Acute Resistance Exercise and Training on de Novo Muscle Protein Synthesis
Actual Study Start Date : January 1, 2019
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 1, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : September 1, 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Males
10 young healthy biological males aged 18 - 30 y
Behavioral: Resistance exercise
Participants performed 8 weeks of resistance training and muscle biopsies were taken before and 24 h before and after the program.

Females
10 young healthy biological females aged 18 - 30 y
Behavioral: Resistance exercise
Participants performed 8 weeks of resistance training and muscle biopsies were taken before and 24 h before and after the program.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Dietary fate of amino acids into myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins [ Time Frame: The change in muscle MPE at 0 and 24 h after acute resistance exercise before and after training ]
    MPE


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Amino acid transporter protein content [ Time Frame: 0 and 24 hours after acute resistance exercise before and after training ]
    Arbitrary units

  2. mTOR localization with capillaries [ Time Frame: 0 and 24 hours after acute resistance exercise before and after training ]
    Pearson's r


Biospecimen Retention:   Samples With DNA
Muscle biopsies, blood and saliva


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 30 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
: Ten recreationally active and healthy young males and females
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants were included in the study after reporting not engaging in whole body RE or plyometrics in the past 3 months and had a BMI between 18.5-27.5 kg/m2.
  • Females were included if they had a regular menstrual cycle with the last 3 months and

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants were excluded if they: i) consumed tobacco and/or illicit anabolic drug use (e.g. testosterone, growth hormones); ii) were a vegan or had a nut allergy and; iii) participated in a study within the past year involving stable isotopes.
  • Females were excluded if they used oral contraceptives and/or discontinued their use within the last 3 months.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04887883


Locations
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Canada, Ontario
Goldring Centre for High Performance Sport
Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M9L 1C5
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Toronto
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Canada
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Daniel Moore, PhD University of Toronto
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Responsible Party: Daniel Moore, Professor, University of Toronto
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04887883    
Other Study ID Numbers: TUT study
RGPIN-2015-04521 ( Other Grant/Funding Number: NSERC Discovery Grant )
First Posted: May 14, 2021    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 14, 2021
Last Verified: May 2021
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Daniel Moore, University of Toronto:
intrinsically labeled proteins
muscle protein synthesis