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The Future of Viral Communications: Video-Based Health Promotion Strategies for COVID-19 Vaccinations

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04876885
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : May 7, 2021
Last Update Posted : May 11, 2021
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sarrah Lal, McMaster University

Brief Summary:
The investigators aim to study whether education, in the form of three two-minute educational videos about COVID-19 vaccine development and dissemination, reduces vaccine hesitancy and increases intent to vaccinate. The investigators intend to use insights from this research study to develop a framework for video-based 'education prescriptions' that reduce vaccine hesitancy and increase intent to vaccinate across a number of infectious diseases. This may have wide-ranging impact: inform practice for health promotions and public health, as well as support infectious disease related work done by healthcare professionals (e.g. those working in travel medicine, where vaccination rates are also low).

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Health Promotion Health Education COVID-19 Vaccines Other: Educational video Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
The World Health Organization listed vaccine hesitancy as one of the leading threats to global health in 2019. Vaccine hesitancy is defined as the "reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines". Given the novelty of the COVID-19 pandemic, hesitancy towards use of COVID-19 vaccine may be linked to the process of vaccine development and clinical trial validation of safety and/or efficacy, rather than hesitations regarding vaccines in general. This has already inspired several education campaigns. It is unclear whether education leads to reduced hesitance and whether reduced hesitance leads to increased intent to vaccinate. Further, early surveys demonstrating high COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and intent to vaccinate may not reflect actual uptake, as shown by comparisons to flu vaccination uptake at a time when flu vaccines are both available, validated and largely freely accessible. Inspiring vaccine confidence is a multifaceted challenge, and the COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on one of its aspects, specifically the public health approach to health information dissemination. The lack of evidence-based knowledge and preparedness coupled with pandemic fatigue impacts the uptake of recommended health behaviours and puts human lives at risk. Different people adopt different responses to health promotion materials based on a variety of socioeconomic factors. For example, in an American study on vaccination in children, it was found that children who had never received a vaccine tended to come from affluent, college educated families, while those who had only received some recommended vaccinations came from minority families that were single parent, low-income and less likely to have completed higher education. Almost 50% of the parents of the unvaccinated children cited concerns about vaccine safety. The strength of beliefs leading to hesitancy may change the ability to affect intent to vaccinate. These beliefs may be contributed to by cultural dimensions in Canada and cultures of recently immigrated individuals, with regards to individualism, collectivism, perceptions of social benefits, etc. These factors might also impact the choice to vaccinate. The existence of many outlets for highly varied information underscores the need for unbiased and credible education on COVID-19 vaccinations. The investigators aim to study whether education, in the form of three two-minute educational videos about COVID-19 vaccine development and dissemination, reduces vaccine hesitancy and increases intent to vaccinate. The investigators intend to use insights from this research study to develop a framework for video-based 'education prescriptions' that reduce vaccine hesitancy and increase intent to vaccinate across a number of infectious diseases. This may have wide-ranging impact: inform practice for health promotions and public health, as well as support infectious disease related work done by healthcare professionals (e.g. those working in travel medicine, where vaccination rates are also low).

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 100 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: This study looks at two groups. First, it directly measures response of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the general public to education videos on COVID-19 vaccine development, validation, and dissemination. Second, it surveys two stakeholder groups - healthcare professionals and public health professionals to better understand their evaluation of COVID-19 vaccine education needs in the general public, based on their interpretation of commonly asked questions, best practices in health promotion, and evaluation of information already available.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: The Future of Viral Communications: Video-Based Health Promotion Strategies for COVID-19 Vaccinations
Estimated Study Start Date : May 6, 2021
Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 6, 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : June 6, 2021

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
General public
The individuals recruited to the study will include those who are age 16 and older. Due to recruitment feasibility we will focus efforts on individuals living in Ontario. We intend to recruit individuals from COVID-19 assessment centres that are partnering in our study as well as through social media posts (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn).
Other: Educational video
Three two-minute educational videos about COVID-19 vaccine development and dissemination

Healthcare professionals and public health professionals
The individuals recruited to the study will include healthcare professionals and public health professionals impacted by infectious disease outbreaks. Social media will be used to disseminate surveys to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, and healthcare workers. Public health units will disseminate surveys to their workforce.
Other: Educational video
Three two-minute educational videos about COVID-19 vaccine development and dissemination




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of participants indicating intent to vaccinate against COVID-19 [ Time Frame: One month ]
    The primary end point of the study is "intent to vaccinate against COVID-19" within the general public survey. We are looking for an increase in intent to vaccinate after the educational videos are completed. This is a yes/no answer choice. A change in response may be indicative of the impact of education on vaccination intent.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in score regarding vaccine hesitation after exposure to educational materials [ Time Frame: One month ]
    The study seeks to understand whether providing video-based educational materials yields a positive change in score regarding vaccine hesitation (at least one point decrease) after exposure to educational materials. A change in score may indicate that educational materials support a decrease in COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy in the population. The scale title will be "Level of concern about the COVID-19 vaccine". Values will range from 1-5, where 1 indicates no concern and 5 indicates high concern.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

For the general public arm:

  • An understanding of the English language at a grade 8 written level
  • Reside in Ontario

For the healthcare professionals and public health professionals arm:

  • Licensed to practice as a healthcare professional in Ontario
  • An understanding of the English language at a grade 8 written level
  • Reside in Ontario

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Any individuals under age 16

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04876885


Contacts
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Contact: Sarrah M Lal, MBA 289.808.8597 lals2@mcmaster.ca
Contact: Faith L Maelzer, BHSc 416.576.1714 maelzerf@mcmaster.ca

Sponsors and Collaborators
McMaster University
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Sarrah M Lal, MBA McMaster University
Additional Information:
Publications:
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Responsible Party: Sarrah Lal, Assistant Professor, McMaster University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04876885    
Other Study ID Numbers: 12902
First Posted: May 7, 2021    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: May 11, 2021
Last Verified: May 2021
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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COVID-19
Respiratory Tract Infections
Infections
Pneumonia, Viral
Pneumonia
Virus Diseases
Coronavirus Infections
Coronaviridae Infections
Nidovirales Infections
RNA Virus Infections
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases