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A Mobile Health Intervention to Reduce Sweet Beverage Consumption in Latino Children

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04754269
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : February 15, 2021
Last Update Posted : February 15, 2021
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of California, San Francisco

Brief Summary:
Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is a major contributor to childhood obesity, caries, fatty liver disease, and Type 2 diabetes. Latino children are more likely to consume sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and to suffer from all of the aforementioned conditions. Reading out loud to children from birth through age 5 is critical for the promotion of language and early literacy skills. Children whose parents read aloud to them are more likely to start school with the skills required for early reading success. This is important as reading proficiency in third grade is the best predictor of high school graduation and career success. Latino children are less likely to be read to than non-Hispanic white children and at higher risk of entering kindergarten without critical early literacy skills. Thus, there is a pressing need for interventions to reduce SSB consumption among Latino children as well as interventions that promote reading out loud. Primary care is an optimal setting for such interventions. However, multiple demands on providers' time make it difficult to rely on in-person interventions. For this reason, it is critical to test intervention designs that do not rely directly on health care providers and that can be delivered remotely if needed. The investigators have developed two m-health interventions for Latino parents, one that promotes optimal beverage consumption patterns and one that promotes reading out loud to children. The purpose of this study is to test the impact of these interventions on child beverage intake patterns and the frequency with which parents read to children.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Child Obesity Child Development Behavioral: Beverage Intervention Behavioral: Reading Intervention Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 200 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Randomized Controlled Trial of an M-health Intervention to Reduce Sweet Beverage Consumption Among Low-income Latino Children
Estimated Study Start Date : February 15, 2021
Estimated Primary Completion Date : February 15, 2022
Estimated Study Completion Date : February 15, 2022

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Beverage Intervention
Parents will watch a video that promotes optimal beverage practices for young children. Parents will receive that reinforce and expand on the messages in the video.
Behavioral: Beverage Intervention
Parents will watch a video that promotes optimal beverage practices for young children including discouraging consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and fruit juice and encouraging consumption of water and unsweetened milk. Parents will receive 24 text messages over a 12 week period that reinforce and expand on the messages in the video.

Experimental: Reading Intervention
Parents will watch a video that promotes reading to children. Parents will receive text messages that reinforce and expand on the messages in the video.
Behavioral: Reading Intervention
Parents will watch a video that promotes reading to children and includes specific ideas and techniques for how to make reading interactive and engaging. Parents will receive 24 text messages over a 12 week period that reinforce and expand on the messages in the video.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in 7-day child consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 3-month follow-up ]
    Parents will report child consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice over previous 7 days in fluid ounces via a verbal questionnaire. The outcome measure will be the summed 7-day total of sugar-sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juice in fluid ounces


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in 7 day total parent intake of sugar-sweetened beverages [ Time Frame: Change from baseline to 3-month follow-up ]
    Parents will report their own consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in the previous 7 days in 8 ounce servings via a verbal questionnaire



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Ages Eligible for Study:   12 Months to 59 Months   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Parent identifies child as Latino/a/x
  • Child age 1 to 5 (12 to 59 months)
  • Parent has a cell phone that can receive text messages
  • Parent speak English or Spanish

Exclusion Criteria:

• Child does not feed by mouth


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04754269


Contacts
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Contact: Amy Beck, MD, MPH (415) 476-3368 amy.beck@ucsf.edu

Locations
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United States, California
San Francisco General Hospital Children's Health Center
San Francisco, California, United States, 94110
Contact: Amy L Beck, MD MPH    415-476-3368    amy.beck@ucsf.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of California, San Francisco
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Amy L Beck, MD, MPH University of California, San Francisco
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Responsible Party: University of California, San Francisco
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04754269    
Other Study ID Numbers: 20-30664
First Posted: February 15, 2021    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 15, 2021
Last Verified: February 2021
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Pediatric Obesity
Obesity
Overnutrition
Nutrition Disorders
Overweight
Body Weight