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Motor Cortical Neuromodulation in Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IcBrainStim)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04734847
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : February 2, 2021
Last Update Posted : June 8, 2021
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jason Kutch, University of Southern California

Brief Summary:
Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS) is a common, chronic, and debilitating condition in women. Preliminary evidence suggests that IC/BPS pain can be reduced applying non-invasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to areas of the brain that regulate pelvic floor muscle activity. However, prior studies have examined rTMS in a very limited sample and have not examined changes in brain or pelvic floor muscle activity to determine the mechanism of rTMS for IC/BPS. This study is designed to directly address these limitations.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Interstitial Cystitis Bladder Pain Syndrome Device: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Device: Sham Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (Sham-rTMS) Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS) is a common, chronic, and debilitating condition in women. The underlying cause of IC/BPS remains unknown. We recently published the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study comparing brain function in women with IC/BPS to healthy women. We found that women with IC/BPS have altered resting activity in supplementary motor area (SMA). Specifically, these changes appear in a part of SMA that we have shown to control pelvic floor muscle activity. We call this part of SMA "pelvic-SMA". Our results provide the first potential explanation for extensive published reports of increased pelvic floor muscle activity in women with IC/BPS. We hypothesize that we are observing evidence of an important theory of chronic pain: motor cortical changes occur that are initially beneficial to increase protective muscle activity but are ultimately maladaptive and perpetuate pain. If this theory is true, it should be possible to reduce pain and muscle activity by improving brain activity. The proposed work is to do exactly that. Using non-invasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) directed at pelvic-SMA, we aim to determine if we can reduce pain (Aim 1), improve resting brain activity (fMRI) and resting pelvic floor muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity in IC/BPS (Aim 2), and to link the pain reductions to fMRI/EMG improvements to develop a causal mediation model of IC/BPS symptoms (Aim 3). We will recruit 50 women with IC/BPS to participate in the study, and participants will be randomized to 2 groups of 25: high-frequency (active) or sham (inert). Our preliminary data suggest that high-frequency stimulation is the best stimulation protocol for reducing pain and improving pelvic-SMA activity and resting pelvic floor muscle activity. Our preliminary results agree with a large body of literature suggesting that high-frequency rTMS applied to motor cortex is the best stimulus paradigm to reduce pain, but our proposed work has the potential to greatly innovate the field of non-invasive brain stimulation for pain by providing a mechanism by which the stimulation can improve deficiencies in motor function in chronic pain patients.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 50 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Motor Cortical Neuromodulation in Women With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome: Reducing Pain by Improving Brain and Muscle Activity
Actual Study Start Date : June 1, 2021
Estimated Primary Completion Date : April 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : April 2025

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: High-frequency rTMS

Intensity: rTMS treatment intensity determined using resting motor threshold (RMT). Treatment will be delivered at 80% of the RMT.

Site of Stimulation: Region of supplementary motor area (SMA) that regulates pelvic floor muscle activity. This target is defined in Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) Coordinates of X=-2, Y=-16, and Z=68 mm.

Frequency: 10 Hz.

Duration: 20 Trains, 10 second duration, 50 second inter-train interval.

Total number of pulses per session: 2000.

Total number of session: 5 (one session per day for 5 consecutive days).

Device: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)
Non-invasive magnetic stimulation of the brain

Sham Comparator: Sham rTMS
Identical to the High-frequency rTMS arm except delivered with an inert "sham" stimulation coil.
Device: Sham Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (Sham-rTMS)
Device that appears identical to the active rTMS device, but does not produce any magnetic field and does not stimulate the brain.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Longer-term Pain [ Time Frame: Before first treatment to 3 weeks after last treatment ]
    Change in Visual Analog Scale of Pain. This scale ranges from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable), so higher scores indicate more pain.

  2. Shorter-term Pain [ Time Frame: Before first treatment to 1 day later just before second treatment ]
    Change in Visual Analog Scale of Pain. This scale ranges from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable), so higher scores indicate more pain.

  3. Global Response Assessment [ Time Frame: 3 weeks after last treatment ]
    Global Response Assessment (GRA)


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. fALFF in Pelvic-SMA [ Time Frame: One hour before and one hour after first treatment ]
    Change in fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in targeted region of the brain (pelvic-SMA)

  2. Pelvic floor muscle activity [ Time Frame: Just before to between five and ten minutes after start of first treatment ]
    Change in activity of pelvic floor muscles as measured by electromyography (EMG). EMG is a physiological parameter measuring the electrical potential generated by a muscle, indicative of its activity. EMG is measured in micro-volts and then converted to percent change.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Be at least 18 years old.
  2. Be female.
  3. Have a diagnosis of IC/BPS by the referring physician, with urologic symptoms present a majority of the time during the most recent 3 months
  4. Screen within standard limits for pelvic pain

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Symptomatic urethral stricture
  2. On-going neurological conditions affecting the bladder or bowel
  3. Active auto-immune or infectious disorders
  4. History of cystitis caused by tuberculosis or radiation or chemotherapies
  5. History of non-dermatologic cancer
  6. Current major psychiatric disorders
  7. Severe cardiac, pulmonary, renal, or hepatic disease
  8. Conditions or the use of medical devices that are contraindications for either fMRI or rTMS procedures, including pregnancy, seizure disorders, or chronic headaches

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04734847


Contacts
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Contact: Jason J Kutch, PhD 323-442-2932 kutch@pt.usc.edu
Contact: Larissa V Rodriguez, MD 310-601-3366 lrodriguez@med.usc.edu

Locations
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United States, California
University of Southern California Recruiting
Los Angeles, California, United States, 90049
Contact: Jason J Kutch, PhD    323-442-2932    kutch@usc.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Southern California
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Jason J Kutch, PhD University of Southern California
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Responsible Party: Jason Kutch, Associate Professor, University of Southern California
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04734847    
Other Study ID Numbers: APP-20-05139
First Posted: February 2, 2021    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 8, 2021
Last Verified: June 2021
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Product Manufactured in and Exported from the U.S.: No
Keywords provided by Jason Kutch, University of Southern California:
Chronic Pain
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Cystitis
Cystitis, Interstitial
Syndrome
Somatoform Disorders
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Mental Disorders
Urinary Bladder Diseases
Urologic Diseases