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Advocating for Supports to Improve Service Transitions (ASSIST)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04173663
Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting
First Posted : November 22, 2019
Last Update Posted : December 2, 2020
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Julie Taylor, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Brief Summary:

This is a randomized intervention study to test and develop the national curriculum of a parent intervention training targeting parent's ability for advocate for services to improve the transition to adulthood for their youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

UPDATE regarding COVID-19: The current intervention has been paused until it is safe to meet as a group again. We are still recruiting participants for cohort 2 (in TN and IL) and Cohort 1 and 2 (in WI), as the plan is to resume the intervention as soon as the situation allows and to keep the future scheduled interventions happening in the Fall of 2020, Fall of 2021 and Winter of 2022. For the baseline data collection visit, we have moved to remote data collection for all measures except the psychological testing with the youth - meaning that families will be able to partially complete baseline data via teleconference and/or phone calls and online surveys. In-person visits to complete the psychological testing with the youth will be scheduled in the future when it is safe to meet face to face.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Autism Spectrum Disorder Autism Behavioral: ASSIST Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

The proposed research plan is designed to develop and test the effectiveness of a national curriculum of the ASSIST (Advocating for SupportS to Improve Service Transition) program, a 12-week parent training program targeting parents' ability to advocate for services to improve the transition to adulthood for youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Preliminary work demonstrated that youth whose parents participated in the "Volunteer Advocacy Program- Transition" or VAP-T (a pilot 12-week intervention program on which ASSIST is based) were more likely to be employed or in postsecondary education (PSE), and received more school-based and adult services, when compared to a wait-list control group.

In the proposed research, the investigators conduct a randomized-controlled trial with 180 families to build on previous findings in four important ways: 1) by making modifications to the program content to make it applicable to service systems across the nation, and rigorously testing whether the ASSIST program is effective when delivered across three states (Tennessee, Illinois, Wisconsin); 2) by incorporating the perspective of offspring with ASD into the intervention and data collection; 3) by examining mechanisms by which the ASSIST program influences youth outcomes; and 4) by exploring barriers to participation and factors that moderate treatment response.

The investigators hypothesize that ASSIST participation will improve parents' advocacy ability, leading to higher rates of employment, PSE, social participation, and service access for youth with ASD. The investigators will test this hypothesis by randomly assigning parents of transition-aged youth with ASD (ages 16-26) to either a treatment or active, materials-only control group, and following families over 3 years. The investigators propose four Specific Aims: (1) To use a multi-site randomized-controlled trial to examine whether ASSIST participation increases parent advocacy ability (i.e. the intervention target); (2) To test whether participating in the ASSIST leads to improved youth outcomes (employment, post-secondary education, social participation, service access) during the transition to adulthood; (3) To examine which aspects of parent advocacy ability mediate the relations between ASSIST participation and youth outcomes; and (4) To explore moderators of treatment response and barriers to participation in the intervention.

By rigorously testing a new intervention to improve the transition to adulthood for youth with ASD, the proposed research addresses an area of critical need as identified by the 2016-7 Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee Strategic Plan. The project will result in a new intervention to improve outcomes for youth with ASD that can be disseminated through state and local agencies across the nation.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 180 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: After eligibility is determined and baseline data are collected, parents will be randomized, in two cohorts, to the treatment or materials-only control condition. Given the relatively small sample size in each cohort at each site (n = 30 at each of three sites), simple randomization is not recommended as it might result in unequal group sizes. The investigators will use 1:1 block randomization within each site to give equal number of subjects in each group. To ensure balance of important covariates, the investigators will block on key moderators: whether the youth has an Intellectual Disability (ID) and is in high school. Co-occurring ID and being in vs. out of high school impact service eligibility, and ID impacts the likelihood of post-secondary education (PSE) and community employment. By balancing moderators, the researchers maximize power to detect effect modification of the treatment effect.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Project ASSIST: Advocating for Supports to Improve Service Transitions
Actual Study Start Date : January 3, 2020
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 30, 2024
Estimated Study Completion Date : May 30, 2024

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: ASSIST intervention group
This group will attend the 12 sessions of the ASSIST training program (one 2-hour session per week for 12 weeks).
Behavioral: ASSIST
The ASSIST program is a 12-week advocacy training to educate parents of youth with ASD about the adult service system. It is a group training, comprised of didactic instruction, family-sharing activities, case studies, and group discussions. The ASSIST program for the proposed study will be directed at each site by an experienced Program Facilitator from the community with knowledge about group processes, person-centered planning, and adult service systems, who will be coached by a member of the study team. The ASSIST program will be delivered in full partnership with the local disability community. In most sessions, the Program Facilitator will be aided by community content experts who present the specifics of each topic.

Written materials only control group
This group will receive the ASSIST curriculum and written materials developed for the program but will not attend the in-person sessions.
Behavioral: ASSIST
The ASSIST program is a 12-week advocacy training to educate parents of youth with ASD about the adult service system. It is a group training, comprised of didactic instruction, family-sharing activities, case studies, and group discussions. The ASSIST program for the proposed study will be directed at each site by an experienced Program Facilitator from the community with knowledge about group processes, person-centered planning, and adult service systems, who will be coached by a member of the study team. The ASSIST program will be delivered in full partnership with the local disability community. In most sessions, the Program Facilitator will be aided by community content experts who present the specifics of each topic.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Parental Knowledge about adult services questionnaire [ Time Frame: Baseline to initial follow-up (3 months after the intervention starts) ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parental knowledge about adult service systems. A questionnaire created by the researchers (based on a measure developed to evaluate the VAP-T, Burke, Goldman, Hart, & Hodapp, 2016) will be used to measure parental knowledge about adult services. The questionnaire consists of 22 multiple-choice questions asking for factual information about adult disability services and the adult disability service system. The total score can range from 0 to 22. Higher scores indicate greater knowledge of the adult disability service system.

  2. Change in Parental Empowerment Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to initial follow-up (3 months after the intervention starts) ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parental empowerment measured using the Family Empowerment Scale (FES; Koren, DeChillo, & Friesen, 1992). The 34-item questionnaire measures the extent to which parents feel empowered across three dimensions: family, the service system; and the larger community and political environment. Items are rated on a 5-point Likert Scale from 1= not at all true to 5 = very true. The total score can range from 34 to 170, with higher scores indicating greater empowerment.

  3. Change in Advocacy Skills and Comfort Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to initial follow-up (3 months after the intervention starts) ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parent advocacy skills measured by the Advocacy Skills and Comfort Scale (ASC; Burke, Goldman, Hart, & Hodapp, 2016). The 10-item measure assesses the degree to which parents feel comfortable and skilled in advocating for their offspring with ASD. Response options range from 1 = not at all to 5 = excellent. The total score can range from 10 to 50, with higher scores indicating more skills/comfort in advocating for their offspring.

  4. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family applied for [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family applied for.

  5. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family is receiving [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family is receiving.

  6. Change in Access to Services interview: Barriers to services [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of barriers to services that the family is experiencing / experienced.

  7. Social Participation Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: 12-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in social participation for youth with ASD. Questions developed to measure social participation (Taylor, Adams, & Bishop, 2016) will be used to measure the social participation achievements of the youth participants before and after ASSIST per parent-report. This measure consists of 10 items with a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 0 = Less than yearly or never to 4 = Several times a week. The total score can range from 0 to 40, with higher scores indicating greater social participation for the youth with ASD.

  8. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: 12-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended 12 months after the intervention. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview.

  9. Change in Advocacy Activities Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parent advocacy activities, measured using the Advocacy Activities measure (Taylor, Hodapp, Burke, Waitz-Kudla, & Rabideau, 2017).The 16-item instrument measures how frequently parents spend time in advocacy activities for the son/daughter with ASD. The response options range from 1 = not at all to 4 = very often. The total score can range from 16 to 64, with higher scores indicating greater parent participation in advocacy activities.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Parental Knowledge about adult services questionnaire [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parental knowledge about adult service systems. A questionnaire created by the researchers (based on a measure developed to evaluate the VAP-T, Burke, Goldman, Hart, & Hodapp, 2016) will be used to measure parental knowledge about adult services. The questionnaire consists of 22 multiple-choice questions asking for factual information about adult disability services and the adult disability service system. The total score can range from 0 to 22. Higher scores indicate greater knowledge of the adult disability service system.

  2. Change in Parental Knowledge about adult services questionnaire [ Time Frame: Baseline to 18-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parental knowledge about adult service systems. A questionnaire created by the researchers (based on a measure developed to evaluate the VAP-T, Burke, Goldman, Hart, & Hodapp, 2016) will be used to measure parental knowledge about adult services. The questionnaire consists of 22 multiple-choice questions asking for factual information about adult disability services and the adult disability service system. The total score can range from 0 to 22. Higher scores indicate greater knowledge of the adult disability service system.

  3. Change in Parental Empowerment Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parental empowerment measured using the Family Empowerment Scale (FES; Koren, DeChillo, & Friesen, 1992). The 34-item questionnaire measures the extent to which parents feel empowered across three dimensions: family, the service system; and the larger community and political environment. Items are rated on a 5-point Likert Scale from 1= not at all true to 5 = very true. The total score can range from 34 to 170, with higher scores indicating greater empowerment.

  4. Change in Parental Empowerment Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to 18-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parental empowerment measured using the Family Empowerment Scale (FES; Koren, DeChillo, & Friesen, 1992). The 34-item questionnaire measures the extent to which parents feel empowered across three dimensions: family, the service system; and the larger community and political environment. Items are rated on a 5-point Likert Scale from 1= not at all true to 5 = very true. The total score can range from 34 to 170, with higher scores indicating greater empowerment.

  5. Change in Advocacy Skills and Comfort Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to 12-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parent advocacy skills measured by the Advocacy Skills and Comfort Scale (ASC; Burke, Goldman, Hart, & Hodapp, 2016). The 10-item measure assesses the degree to which parents feel comfortable and skilled in advocating for their offspring with ASD. Response options range from 1 = not at all to 5 = excellent. The total score can range from 10 to 50, with higher scores indicating more skills/comfort in advocating for their offspring.

  6. Change in Advocacy Skills and Comfort Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to 18-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parent advocacy skills measured by the Advocacy Skills and Comfort Scale (ASC; Burke, Goldman, Hart, & Hodapp, 2016). The 10-item measure assesses the degree to which parents feel comfortable and skilled in advocating for their offspring with ASD. Response options range from 1 = not at all to 5 = excellent. The total score can range from 10 to 50, with higher scores indicating more skills/comfort in advocating for their offspring.

  7. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family applied for [ Time Frame: Baseline to 6-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family applied for.

  8. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family applied for [ Time Frame: Baseline to 24-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family applied for.

  9. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family applied for [ Time Frame: Baseline to 30-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family applied for.

  10. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family is receiving [ Time Frame: Baseline to 6-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family is receiving.

  11. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family is receiving [ Time Frame: Baseline to 24-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family is receiving.

  12. Change in Access to Services interview: Number of services the family is receiving [ Time Frame: Baseline to 30-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of services that the family is receiving.

  13. Change in Access to Services interview: Barriers to services [ Time Frame: Baseline to 6-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of barriers to services that the family is experiencing / experienced.

  14. Change in Access to Services interview: Barriers to services [ Time Frame: Baseline to 24-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of barriers to services that the family is experiencing / experienced.

  15. Change in Access to Services interview: Barriers to services [ Time Frame: Baseline to 30-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase access to services for youth with ASD transitioning from high school to adulthood. Using questions developed for the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS-2; Sanford et al., 2011), the investigators will collect data (via a semi-structured interview) on total number of barriers to services that the family is experiencing / experienced.

  16. Social Participation Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in social participation for youth with ASD. Questions developed to measure social participation (Taylor, Adams, & Bishop, 2016) will be used to measure the social participation achievements of the youth participants before and after ASSIST per parent-report. This measure consists of 10 items with a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 0 = Less than yearly or never to 4 = Several times a week. The total score can range from 0 to 40, with higher scores indicating greater social participation for the youth with ASD.

  17. Social Participation Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: 30-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in social participation for youth with ASD. Questions developed to measure social participation (Taylor, Adams, & Bishop, 2016) will be used to measure the social participation achievements of the youth participants before and after ASSIST per parent-report. This measure consists of 10 items with a 5-point Likert scale ranging from 0 = Less than yearly or never to 4 = Several times a week. The total score can range from 0 to 40, with higher scores indicating greater social participation for the youth with ASD.

  18. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview.

  19. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: 6-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended 6 months after the intervention. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview.

  20. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: 24-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended 24 months after the intervention. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview.

  21. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes [ Time Frame: 30-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended 30 months after the intervention. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview.

  22. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Employment stability [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in employment stability for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment that youth with ASD had before the intervention. The investigators will collect total number of jobs/positions that youth had. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview

  23. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Employment stability [ Time Frame: 6-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in employment stability for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment that youth with ASD had before the intervention. The investigators will collect total number of jobs/positions that youth had. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview

  24. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Employment stability [ Time Frame: 24-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in employment stability for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment that youth with ASD had before the intervention. The investigators will collect total number of jobs/positions that youth had. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview

  25. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Employment stability [ Time Frame: 30-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in employment stability for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment that youth with ASD had before the intervention. The investigators will collect total number of jobs/positions that youth had. The Vocational Index will be administered via structured interview

  26. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Hours spent in activity [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended before ASSIST. The investigators will collect total number of hours per week spent in these activities.

  27. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Hours spent in activity [ Time Frame: 6-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended before and after ASSIST. Additionally, the investigators will collect total number of hours per week spent in these activities.

  28. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Hours spent in activity [ Time Frame: 12-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended before and after ASSIST. Additionally, the investigators will collect total number of hours per week spent in these activities.

  29. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Hours spent in activity [ Time Frame: 24-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended before and after ASSIST. Additionally, the investigators will collect total number of hours per week spent in these activities.

  30. Post-Secondary Youth Outcomes: Hours spent in activity [ Time Frame: 30-month post-intervention ]
    Test whether parent participation in the ASSIST intervention leads to increase in post-secondary vocational and educational participation for youth with ASD. The Vocational Index (Taylor & Seltzer, 2012) will be used to gather information on employment and post-secondary educational programs that youth with ASD are attending / attended before and after ASSIST. Additionally, the investigators will collect total number of hours per week spent in these activities.

  31. Change in Advocacy Activities Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline to 30-month post-intervention ]
    Examine whether ASSIST participation increases the intervention target of parent advocacy activities, measured using the Advocacy Activities measure (Taylor, Hodapp, Burke, Waitz-Kudla, & Rabideau, 2017).The 16-item instrument measures how frequently parents spend time in advocacy activities for the son/daughter with ASD. The response options range from 1 = not at all to 4 = very often. The total score can range from 16 to 64, with higher scores indicating greater parent participation in advocacy activities.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   16 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion criteria include:

  1. parents willing to participate in the ASSIST 12-week intervention, who have an offspring with ASD between the ages of 16 and 26 years. This age range was chosen to allow for the testing of whether the ASSIST is more effective if offered prior to versus after high school exit (a key moderator in Aim 4). The investigators set a lower bound of age 16, as that is when transition planning is mandated to have begun in the schools, and an upper bound of age 26 to capture families of youth who are still in the "transition years" as defined by the Institute of Medicine. If both parents in a family want to attend the training, the investigators will allow it but will designate one as the study's primary respondent. There is no maximum age for parent participants.
  2. parents are willing to be randomized to the treatment or control condition;
  3. parents are able to travel weekly to one of the project sites (Nashville, TN; Chicagoland;IL; Madison/Milwaukee, WI) to participate in the group ASSIST sessions (12 weekly sessions). The responding parent and the offspring with ASD must also be able to travel to a project site for a diagnostic evaluation to confirm the ASD diagnosis (using the gold- standard Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2 or ADOS-2) and to establish IQ and adaptive behavior functioning;
  4. the participating parent and youth must live in one of the states where the intervention is being delivered, as the adult service system is different in every state;
  5. son/daughter has a previous diagnosis of ASD from an educational or health care provider, and meets lifetime cut-offs for ASD in a telephone screening of the Social Communication Questionnaire. This will decrease the risk that youth fail to meet diagnostic criteria for ASD during the diagnostic evaluation. Note that although the investigators will collect IQ and adaptive behavior information to assess functioning of the offspring with ASD, this information will not be used to determine eligibility; parents of offspring with all levels of functioning can participate in the ASSIST project; and
  6. the participating parent is proficient with the English language, as all ASSIST presentations and data collection materials are in English.

Exclusion criteria include:

  1. parents unable to participate in the ASSIST 12-week intervention due to scheduling conflicts, or who are unable to travel weekly to one of the sites;
  2. parents NOT willing to be randomized to the treatment or control condition;
  3. parents and/or youth do NOT live in one of the states where the intervention is being delivered;
  4. The youth does not have a previous diagnosis of ASD from an educational or health care provider
  5. The youth does not meet lifetime cut-offs for ASD in a telephone screening of the Social Communication Questionnaire, answered by the parent.
  6. The participating parent is not proficient with the English language.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04173663


Locations
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United States, Illinois
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Chicago, Illinois, United States, 60007
United States, Tennessee
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, Tennessee, United States, 37203
United States, Wisconsin
Waisman Center at University of Madison-Wisconsin
Madison, Wisconsin, United States, 53558
Sponsors and Collaborators
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Julie Lounds Taylor, PhD Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Additional Information:
Publications:
Burke,MM, Goldman SE, Hart MS, Hodapp RM. Evaluating the Efficacy of a Special Education Advocacy Training Program: Evaluating the Efficacy of Advocacy Training. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, 13(4), 269-276, 2016.
Koren PE, DeChillo N, Friesen, BJ. Measuring empowerment in families whose children have emotional disabilities: A brief questionnaire. Rehabilitation Psychology, 37(4), 305-321, 1992.
Sanford C, Newman L, Wagner M, Cameto R, Knokey AM, Shaver D. The Post-High School Outcomes of Young Adults with Disabilities up to 6 Years after High School: Key Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study-2 (NLTS2). NCSER 2011-3004. National Center for Special Education Research, 2011.

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Responsible Party: Julie Taylor, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04173663    
Other Study ID Numbers: 191187
First Posted: November 22, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: December 2, 2020
Last Verified: December 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Autistic Disorder
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Mental Disorders