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A Training Program for Developing Social- and Personal Resources

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04165473
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : November 18, 2019
Last Update Posted : November 26, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Christoph Janka, Medical University of Vienna

Brief Summary:

In this study, a new psychosocial training for social relationships for mildly and heavily stressed adults will be evaluated. In a 6-module course, with four 3-day modules and two 5-day modules in the timeframe of one year, participants learn ways to strengthen their personal resources to establish effective social relationships and to develop skills as a social being. In between the module courses, the participants take 5 single sessions with an instructed trainer and document 10 conversations/social situations where they successfully applied the new skills. Each group consists of 15 to 35 participants. For this study, a total of 400 persons will be recruited. Approx. one hundred participants self-select to the intervention-social- and personal resources-course group and 100 individuals to the control group (matched for gender, age, employment status, family status, relationship status, perceived stress, daily stressors, and stressful life events in the past year) as well as 100 partner controls having a close relationship to the participants and 100 partner controls having a close relationship to the matched controls are planned. During the course of the training, the participants are thought to develop in a way that lowers their perceived stress level in daily life, improves their health behaviour and health status, leads to a higher satisfaction with their lives, improves the quality of their social relationships and results in higher wellbeing.

Before, during and 6 months after the training the participants and the control group will be evaluated with standardized questionnaires.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Stress, Psychological Stress, Emotional Health Behavior Satisfaction, Personal Health Status Psychophysiology Family Relations Program Evaluation Behavioral: Training Program for Developing Social- and Personal Resources Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Human beings perceive stress differently and several bio-psycho-social factors, as well as personal and environmental factors influence how persons can manage and cope with stress. Concepts, such as resilience, facilitate positive attitudes towards self-management of stressful life situations. Phylogenetically, (positive) stress produced/s adequate reactions of humans in difficult or dangerous situations, like to fight or run away in the time when human beings were predominantly hunter-gatherers. However, persistent stress, as well as the inability to sufficiently cope with stress have several negative consequences for the physical and mental health of humans. Negative stress is a major contributor to chronic diseases, like cardiovascular diseases, cancer, respiratory disorders, mental diseases including depression, but also the occurrence of accidental injuries. Insufficient coping can result in a harmful health behaviour at first and in the long term to a higher overall morbidity and mortality. This means not only a personal, emotional and physical burden but also a financial burden for the society as a whole, as well as the health system of a country.

On the other hand, satisfactory social relationships were found to have a stress buffering, positive effect on how people deal with stress and are beneficial for one's own health over the course of life. Satisfactory social relationships might even lead to longevity.

The following research questions will be addressed in this study:

  1. Has a 1-year training program for social- and personal resources an influence on the perceived stress level, health behavior, health status, satisfaction with life, quality of social relationships, and wellbeing of the participants and the person they have a close relationship with compared to a matched control group in a quasi-experimental longitudinal study?
  2. Do the different items addressed during training (life goals, meaning in life, sense of coherence, social- and personal resources and transcendence) change in their perception by the participants or by persons the participants have a close relationship with compared to matched controls?
  3. Are the changes of these perceptions (concerning life goals, meaning in life, sense of coherence, social- and personal resources and transcendence) predictive for the changes of perceived stress level, health behaviour, health status, satisfaction with life, quality of social relationships, and wellbeing and how much does each of them contribute?
  4. If any changes occur, how sustainable are they during the longer-term observational period of 6 months after the training? In case the concepts underlying the development of the training can be corroborated, this would indicate a potential for developing personal resources in adult stage, foster a new understanding of how health can be maintained and improved, and give insight into healthy functioning and the role of social relationships.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 400 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: The study has a parallel group, quasi-experimental, longitudinal design. The control group (CG) is matched with the intervention group (IG) by gender (male/female/divers), age (+/-5), employment status (full time employed/part-time employed/unemployed/in education/educational leave/maternity or paternity leave/retired), family status (children/no children), relationship status (single/in a permanent relationship/undecided), perceived stress (+/-3), daily stressors (+/-30) and stressful life events within the last 3 months (yes/no). The matching is performed stepwise beginning with 7 matching characteristics down until 4 characteristics in case a large enough sample size cannot be reached. Control group members with less than 4 matching characteristics will be excluded from the study. For each participant of the training group and the matched control group a person they have a close relationship to will be included in the study.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: A Training Program for Developing Social- and Personal Resources and Its Effects on Emotional, Physical and Social Wellbeing in Adults
Actual Study Start Date : November 14, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : March 31, 2022
Estimated Study Completion Date : March 31, 2022

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Intervention Group
In a 6-module course, with four 3-day modules and two 5-day modules in the timeframe of one year, participants learn ways to strengthen their personal resources to establish effective social relationships and to develop skills as a social being. In between the module courses, the participants take 5 single sessions with an instructed trainer and document 10 conversations/social situations where they successfully applied the new skills.
Behavioral: Training Program for Developing Social- and Personal Resources

The training-method shows how one's own resonance can be exposed in order to live the balance between one's own needs and those of others.

Living one's own resonance means: more quality of life, work-life balance, holistic health through living feelings and talents, live equal, respectful and loving relationships, more personal responsibility, authentic decision making find new role models in private and professional areas.

The teaching and learning methods of the trainings and seminars are implemented according to the latest state of brain research and enable new perspectives with regard to new learning strategies, goals, enthusiasm and motivation.

With the Kutschera-Resonanz® method we teach and learn to consciously use this unconscious reservoir so that completely new dimensions in thinking and acting open up.

In this training program the basic tools of communication and interaction according to the Kutschera-Resonanz® method are taught and experienced by the participants.

Other Name: Kutschera-Resonance-Practitioner

No Intervention: Intervention Group - Close Relationship
Individuals having a close relationship to participants of the Intervention Group
No Intervention: Control Group
Individuals matched to the participants of the Intervention Group
No Intervention: Control Group - Close Relationship
Individuals having a close relationship to participants of the Control Group



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Perceived Stress Scale score change between T0 and T5 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and at the end of the intervention (on average one year after first assessment) ]
    the change on the self-reported Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) (score range: 0-40) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the training program (= T5)

  2. Perceived Stress Scale score change between T0 and T6 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and 6 months after the intervention has ended ]
    the change on the self-reported Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) (score range: 0-40) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the follow-up period, 6 months after the training program has ended (= T6)


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change of Health Status between T0 and T5 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and at the end of the intervention (on average one year after first assessment) ]
    the change on the Giessen physical complaints questionnaire (GBB-24) (score range: 0-96) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the training program (= T5)

  2. Change of Health Status between T0 and T6 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and 6 months after the intervention has ended ]
    the change on the Giessen physical complaints questionnaire (GBB-24) (score range: 0-96) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the follow-up period, 6 months after the training program has ended (= T6)

  3. Change of Wellbeing between T0 and T5 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and at the end of the intervention (on average one year after first assessment) ]
    the change on the World Health Organisation questionnaire (WHO-5) (score range: 0-25) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the training program (= T5)

  4. Change of Wellbeing between T0 and T6 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and 6 months after the intervention has ended ]
    the change on the World Health Organisation questionnaire (WHO-5) (score range: 0-25) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the follow-up period, 6 months after the training program has ended (= T6)

  5. Change of Quality of Relationships between T0 and T5 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and at the end of the intervention (on average one year after first assessment) ]
    the change on the Evaluation of Social Systems questionnaire (EVOS) (score range: 0-120) and Experience in Social Systems questionnaire (EXIS) (score range: 1-6) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the training program (= T5)

  6. Change of Quality of Relationships between T0 and T6 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and 6 months after the intervention has ended ]
    the change on the Evaluation of Social Systems questionnaire (EVOS) (score range: 0-120) and Experience in Social Systems questionnaire (EXIS) (score range: 1-6) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the follow-up period, 6 months after the training program has ended (= T6)

  7. Change of Satisfaction with Life between T0 and T5 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and at the end of the intervention (on average one year after first assessment) ]
    the change on the Life Satisfaction questionnaire (LS-4) (score range: 4-20) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the training program (= T5)

  8. Change of Satisfaction with Life between T0 and T6 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and 6 months after the intervention has ended ]
    the change on the Life Satisfaction questionnaire (LS-4) (score range: 4-20) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the follow-up period, 6 months after the training program has ended (= T6)

  9. Change of Health Behavior between T0 and T5 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and at the end of the intervention (on average one year after first assessment) ]
    the change on the Questionnaire for Health Behaviour Evaluation (FEG) questionnaire, sections physical activity (score range: -20-26), sleep (score range: 10-50), psychosocial burden (score range: 2-46) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the training program (= T5)

  10. Change of Health Behavior between T0 and T6 [ Time Frame: before the intervention and 6 months after the intervention has ended ]
    the change on the Questionnaire for Health Behaviour Evaluation (FEG) questionnaire, sections physical activity (score range: -20-26), sleep (score range: 10-50), psychosocial burden (score range: 2-46) from baseline (start of the training program = T0) until end of the follow-up period, 6 months after the training program has ended (= T6)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • male, female, divers
  • fluently German speaking
  • between 18-70 years of age
  • given informed consent

Intervention Arm:

  • a value of greater or equal to 19 on the perceived stress scale
  • having completed 2 or more modules of the training
  • intention or not sure yet to complete the whole training

Exclusion Criteria:

  • not speaking German fluently
  • being below 18 or above 70 years of age
  • not given an informed consent

Intervention Arm:

  • a value smaller than 19 on the perceived stress scale
  • plans to take only the first module or already has taken other modules first
  • not having completed 2 or more modules of the training

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04165473


Contacts
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Contact: Christoph Janka, DI +4369917142413 n0025927@students.meduniwien.ac.at

Locations
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Austria
Institut Kutschera Recruiting
Vienna, Austria
Contact: Christoph Janka, DI    +4369917142413    n0025927@students.meduniwien.ac.at   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Medical University of Vienna
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Christoph Janka, DI Medical Universtiy of Vienna
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Christoph Janka, Medical University of Vienna:

Publications:
Uchino BN, Uno D, Holt-Lunstad J. Social Support, Physiological Processes, and Health. Curr Dir Psychol Sci. 1999;8(5):145-8
Tomasello M, Melis AP, Tennie C, Wyman E, Herrmann E. Two Key Steps in the Evolution of Human Cooperation. Curr Anthropol. [2012;53(6):673-92
European Commission. European platform against poverty and social exclusion - A European framework for social and territorial cohesion. 2014. 1-2 p
Poverty, social exclusion and health systems in the WHO European Region [Internet]. World Health Organization. 2010 [cited 23 August 2018]. Available from: http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/127525/e94499.pdf
Gilman R. The Relationship Between Life Satisfaction, Social Interest, and Frequency of Extracurricular Activities Among Adolescent Students. J Youth Adolesc. 2001;30(6):749-67
Myers D. Close Relationships and Quality of Life. Well-being: The foundations of hedonic psychology. 1999. 374-391 p.
Waidhofer M. Soziale Kompetenz im Diskurs [Dissertation]. JKU Linz; 2004. German
Zautra AJ, Hall JS, Murray KE. Resilience: A New Definition of Health for People and Communities. In: Handbook of Adult Resilience. 2010. p. 3-30
Henry JP, Stephens PM. Stress, Health and the Social Environment, A Sociobiologic Approach to Medicine. New York, Heidelberg, Berlin: Springer Verlag; 1977. 282 p.
World Health Organization. Promoting Mental Health - Concepts, Emerging Evidence, Practice [Internet]. 2004. Available from: http://www.who.int/mental_health/evidence/en/promoting_mhh.pdf
Mental health: a state of well-being [Internet]. World Health Organization. 2014 [cited 26 August 2018]. Available from: http://www.who.int/features/factfiles/mental_health/en/
Rhodes RE, Boudreau P. Physical Activity and Personality Traits. Oxford Res Encycl Psychol .2017;1(February):online. Available from: http://psychology.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780190236557.001.0001/acrefore-9780190236557-e-210 [Accessed 31 Aug. 2018]
Fernández-Ballesteros R, Zamarrón MD, Ruíz MA. The contribution of socio-demographic and psychosocial factors to life satisfaction. Ageing Soc. 2001;21(1):25-43
Luhmann M, Lucas RE, Eid M, Diener E. The Prospective Effect of Life Satisfaction on Life Events. Soc Psychol Personal Sci. 2013;4(1):39-45
Ryff CD, Singer BH. Know thyself and become what you are: A eudaimonic approach to psychological well-being. J Happiness Stud. 2008;9(1):13-39.
Huppert FA. Psychological Well-being: Evidence Regarding its Causes and Consequences. Appl Psychol Heal Well-Being. 2009;1(2):137-64.
Kutschera, G. (2018). Entstehung und Entwicklung der Kutschera- Resonanz® Methode. [pdf] Institut Kutschera. Available at: https://www.kutschera.org-/fileadmin/kutschera/pdf/Entwicklung_der_Resonanzmethode.pdf [Accessed 31 Aug. 2018].
Tosey P, Langley D, Mathison J. Bateson's Levels Of Learning: a Framework For Workplace Learning. In: van Woerkom M, Poell R, editors. Workplace Learning: Concepts, Measurement, and Application. Routledge; 2010. p. 55-68.
Sandu A. Using the Pyramid of Neurological Levels in the Human Resources Motivation Management. Rev Rom pentru Educ Multidimens. 2016;8(2):31-44.
Necşoi DV, Porumbu D, Beldianu IF. Self-Reflexivity - Transversal Competence in Teachers' Training. Procedia - Soc Behav Sci. 2013;82:186-91.
Kutschera G. Tanz zwischen Bewusst-sein und Unbewusst-sein. Paderborn: Junfermann; 2007. 513 p.
Kutschera, G. and Hoffmann, A. (2008). Theorie Sozialkompetenz in der Resonanzmethode®. [pdf] Wien: Institut Kutschera. Available at: https://www.kutschera.org/fileadmin/kutschera/pdf/Publikationen/KutscheraG-KutscheraA_2008_Theorie-Sozialkompetenz-in-der-Resonanzmethode.pdf [Accessed 31 Aug. 2018]
Kutschera (2015). Ausbildung zum Kutschera-Resonanz Practitioner. [pdf] Institut Kutschera. Available at: https://www.kundenmeister.com/crm/index.php/-filemanager/getById/1869/22/2_Leitfaden_Practitioner.pdf [Accessed 31 Aug. 2018].
Stress - Belastungen besser bewältigen [Internet]. Techniker Krankenkasse; 2017 [cited 31 August 2018]. Available from: https://www.tk.de/resource/blob/2023234/5535b9478a9be8fcabb0a1c6ea7f677e/tk-broschuere--stress--data.pdf
Aguilar-Raab C, Mühlhan L, Schweitzer J. EVOS - Evaluation of Social Systems. Kemper CJ, Zenger M, Brähler E, editors. Handbuch Kurzskalen psychologischer Merkmale. Berlin: Medizinisch-Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft; 2014. S. 72-75.
Klusmann U, Trautwein U, Lüdtke O. Intrinsische und extrinsische Lebensziele: Rehabilität und Validität einer deutschen Fassung des Aspirations Index. Diagnostica. 2005;51(1):40-51.
Steger MF, Frazier P, Oishi S, Kaler M. The Meaning in Life Questionnaire: Assessing the Presence of and Search for Meaning in Life. J Couns Psychol. 2006;53(1):80-93.
Ruch W, Martínez-Martí ML, Proyer RT, Harzer C. The Character Strengths Rating Form (CSRF): Development and initial assessment of a 24-item rating scale to assess character strengths. Pers Individ Dif. Elsevier Ltd; 2014;68:53-8.
Psychiatric Research Unit - WHO Collaborating Centre in Mental Health. WHO (fünf) - Fragebogen zum Wohlbefinden. Hillerod; 1998

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Responsible Party: Christoph Janka, Principal Investigator, Medical University of Vienna
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04165473    
Other Study ID Numbers: EK1592/2019
First Posted: November 18, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 26, 2019
Last Verified: November 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Christoph Janka, Medical University of Vienna:
Social Resources
Social Wellbeing
Training Program
Personal Resources
Adults
Emotional Wellbeing
Physical Wellbeing
Perceived Stress
Satisfaction with Life
Health Behavior
Quality of Relationships
Health Status
Sense of Coherence
Life Goals
Meaning in Life
Transcendence
Evaluation
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Stress, Psychological
Behavioral Symptoms