Working…
ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov Menu
Trial record 1 of 1 for:    Mündermann | cartilage biomarkers | Switzerland
Previous Study | Return to List | Next Study

MechSens - Dose-response Relationship of in Vivo Ambulatory Load and Mechanosensitive Cartilage Biomarkers (MechSens)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04128566
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : October 16, 2019
Last Update Posted : January 27, 2021
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Swiss National Science Foundation
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland

Brief Summary:
This study is to investigate the effects of age, tissue status and the presence of inflammation on the in vivo dose-response relationship of ambulatory load and mechanosensitive blood markers of articular cartilage.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Articular Cartilage Degeneration Procedure: walking stress test Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue that facilitates joint motion with minimal friction. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease that affects the whole joint resulting in severe articular cartilage degeneration with a prevalence worldwide of more than 10%. Although the molecular mechanisms that trigger the pathological changes in OA are largely unknown, the ability of chondrocytes to respond to load is believed to play a critical role in maintaining healthy tissue and in the initiation of OA. Different modes of ambulation have resulted in increases of specific blood markers, and immobilization during bed-rest lead to reductions in the same blood markers. However, the dose-response relationship between ambulatory load and mechanosensitive blood markers, its biological variation in healthy persons and in patients with a high risk of developing OA (e.g. with increasing age or after joint injury), and its relevance for cartilage degeneration are unknown. Based on reported differences in the magnitude of load-induced changes in blood markers of articular cartilage depending on the type of physical activity,an experimental framework of a systematic and controlled modulation of weight bearing during a walking stress test was previously tested and will be employed in this study. The following specific aims will be adressed:

Specific Aim 1: Investigate the in vivo dose-response relationship between ambulatory load and mechanosensitive blood markers of articular cartilage using controlled weight bearing during a walking stress test and age, tissue status and the presence of inflammation as experimental paradigms.

Specific Aim 2: Investigate the prognostic ability of the individual in vivo dose-response relationship between ambulatory load and mechanosensitive blood markers of articular cartilage for articular cartilage degeneration.

Healthy subjects and subjects with previous anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury aged 20 to 50 years will be clinically assessed, undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both knees, and complete questionnaires on physical function and physical activity. Participants will wear an activity monitor for the 7 days before and during the experiment to record their physical activity level. Each participant will complete three walking stress tests (30 minutes walking) on separate days with repeated blood sampling to assess load-induced changes in levels of mechanosensitive blood markers (COMP, MMP-3, PRG-4, ADAMTS-4). In each test, one of three different ambulatory loads will be applied (80, 100 and 120% body weight (BW)). Inflammation will be assessed as IL-6 serum concentration. Tissue status of articular knee cartilage will be assessed as MRI T2 relaxation time and cartilage thickness at baseline and at 24-month follow-up.

Layout table for study information
Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 96 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Masking Description: Blinding to the experimental condition is not possible because of the obvious differences between conditions (partial weight bearing and additional load). However, the person processing the data will be blinded to the condition.
Primary Purpose: Diagnostic
Official Title: MechSens - Dose-response Relationship of in Vivo Ambulatory Load and Mechanosensitive Cartilage Biomarkers: the Role of Age and Tissue Health
Actual Study Start Date : January 8, 2020
Estimated Primary Completion Date : November 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : November 2023

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Group 1: healthy subjects aged between 20 and 30 years
healthy subjects aged between 20 and 30 years
Procedure: walking stress test
walk for 30 minutes on a treadmill with either one of the three loading conditions (reduced load = 80% Bodyweight (BW), normal load = 100% BW, increased load = 120% BW). The order of experimental condition will be applied in randomized order determined by block randomization, and the same self-selected walking speed will be used for all conditions.

Experimental: Group 2: previous ACL injury aged between 20 and 30 years
subjects with previous Anterior cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury aged between 20 and 30 years
Procedure: walking stress test
walk for 30 minutes on a treadmill with either one of the three loading conditions (reduced load = 80% Bodyweight (BW), normal load = 100% BW, increased load = 120% BW). The order of experimental condition will be applied in randomized order determined by block randomization, and the same self-selected walking speed will be used for all conditions.

Experimental: Group 3: healthy subjects aged between 40 and 60 years
healthy subjects aged between 40 and 60 years
Procedure: walking stress test
walk for 30 minutes on a treadmill with either one of the three loading conditions (reduced load = 80% Bodyweight (BW), normal load = 100% BW, increased load = 120% BW). The order of experimental condition will be applied in randomized order determined by block randomization, and the same self-selected walking speed will be used for all conditions.

Experimental: previous ACL injury aged between 40 and 60 years
subjects with previous ACL injury aged between 40 and 60 years
Procedure: walking stress test
walk for 30 minutes on a treadmill with either one of the three loading conditions (reduced load = 80% Bodyweight (BW), normal load = 100% BW, increased load = 120% BW). The order of experimental condition will be applied in randomized order determined by block randomization, and the same self-selected walking speed will be used for all conditions.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in serum levels of Interleukin 6 (IL-6), ( mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in pg/ml [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), immediately after walking stress test (t1), 30-minutes after walking stress test (t2) and after two additional 90-minute resting intervals after walking stress test (t3 and t4) ]
    Change in serum level of Interleukin 6 (IL-6), (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in pg/ml

  2. Change in serum levels of Cartilage oligomeric matrix Protein (COMP) (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in U/l [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), immediately after walking stress test (t1), 30-minutes after walking stress test (t2) and after two additional 90-minute resting intervals after walking stress test (t3 and t4) ]
    Change in serum levels of Cartilage oligomeric matrix Protein (COMP) (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in U/l

  3. Change in serum levels of Matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-3 (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in ng/ml [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), immediately after walking stress test (t1), 30-minutes after walking stress test (t2) and after two additional 90-minute resting intervals after walking stress test (t3 and t4) ]
    Change in serum levels of Matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-3 (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in ng/ml

  4. Change in serum levels of Matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9 (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in ng/ml [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), immediately after walking stress test (t1), 30-minutes after walking stress test (t2) and after two additional 90-minute resting intervals after walking stress test (t3 and t4) ]
    Change in serum levels of Matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-9 (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in ng/ml

  5. Change in serum levels of Proteoglycan (PGR)-4 (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in mg/ml [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), immediately after walking stress test (t1), 30-minutes after walking stress test (t2) and after two additional 90-minute resting intervals after walking stress test (t3 and t4) ]
    Change in serum levels of Proteoglycan (PGR)-4 (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in mg/ml

  6. Change in serum levels of A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS-4) (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in ng/mL [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), immediately after walking stress test (t1), 30-minutes after walking stress test (t2) and after two additional 90-minute resting intervals after walking stress test (t3 and t4) ]
    Change in serum levels of A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS-4) (mechanosensitive blood marker of articular cartilage) in ng/mL


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in modified Knee Society Score (KSS) score [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), at 12-month follow-up, at 24-month follow-up ]
    KSS consists of a total of 34 questions divided into four subscales which are rated separately. It consists of a Knee Score, which only rates the knee joint itself (e.g. pain, range of motion, stability and radiographic alignment), and a Function Score (patient's walking distance, climbing stairs and use of walking aids). The higher the score, the better the outcome in all subscales.

  2. Change in modified Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) score [ Time Frame: Before walking stress test (t0= Baseline), at 12-month follow-up, at 24-month follow-up ]
    The KOOS evaluates both short-term and long-term consequences of knee injury. It holds 42 items in 5 separately scored subscales; Pain, other Symptoms, Function in daily living (ADL), Function in Sport and Recreation (Sport/Rec), and knee-related Quality of Life (QOL). The five KOOS subscales rate on a 5-point Likert-scale as extremely important, very important, moderately important, somewhat important, or not important at all.

  3. Change in Physical activity (PA) level [ Time Frame: during the 7 days prior to Baseline and during the Walking stress test (t0= Baseline) ]
    PA level ( number of steps taken, PA intensity) will be recorded using an activity monitor (ActiGraph GT3X+, Pensacola, FL, USA)

  4. Joint kinematics and kinetics [ Time Frame: during the Walking stress test (t0= Baseline) ]
    For the the three loading conditions at the Walking stress test, an inertial sensor system (RehaGait®, Hasomed GmbH, Magdeburg, Germany) will be used to collect joint angle curves at the ankle, knee and hip.

  5. Change in heart rate (beats per minute) [ Time Frame: During the walking stress test until 10 minutes after the stress test ]
    To assess and compare the cardiovascular stress subjects experience during the walking stress tests the heart rate will be measured.

  6. Change in T2 relaxation time from baseline to follow-up [ Time Frame: MRI at least 7 days prior to the Walking stress test (t0= Baseline) and MRI 24 months after baseline ]
    Tissue status will be determined by the T2 relaxation time of weight bearing knee cartilage analyzed by Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) of both knees

  7. Change in cartilage thickness from baseline to follow-up [ Time Frame: MRI at least 7 days prior to the Walking stress test (t0= Baseline) and MRI 24 months after baseline ]
    Tissue status will be determined by the thickness of weight bearing knee cartilage analyzed by Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) of both knees



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


Layout table for eligibility information
Ages Eligible for Study:   20 Years to 60 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria for group 1 and 3:

  • Being physically active (>2hours/week)
  • No previous known knee injury:

Inclusion Criteria for group 2 and 4:

  • Being physically active (>2hours/week)
  • ACL rupture between 2 to 10 years prior to the study

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Inability to provide informed consent
  • Age < 20 years (before maturation) or age > 60 years
  • Advanced general sarcopenia (degenerative loss of muscle mass in aging) and high likelihood of osteoarthritic changes
  • Body mass index (BMI) > 35 kg/m2:
  • Excessive skin movement that influences the gait analysis
  • Inability to walk for 30 minutes
  • Contraindications for a knee MRI
  • Active rheumatic disorder
  • Prior neuromuscular impairment (e.g. stroke)
  • Conditions other than knee injury that could cause abnormal patterns of locomotion
  • Prior hip, knee, and ankle prosthesis
  • Osteotomy of the lower extremities - Prior spine surgery
  • Other major medical problems
  • Pregnancy
  • Investigators and their immediate families are not permitted to be subjects
  • Persons who have previously completed or withdrawn from this study
  • Patients currently enrolled in another experimental (interventional) protocol

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04128566


Contacts
Layout table for location contacts
Contact: Annegret Mündermann, Prof. Dr. 061 328 5445 annegret.muendermann@unibas.ch

Locations
Layout table for location information
Switzerland
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University Hospital Basel Recruiting
Basel, Switzerland, 4031
Contact: Annegret Muendermann, Prof. Dr.    0041 61 328 5445    annegret.muendermann@unibas.ch   
Contact: Ilona Ahlborn       ilona.ahlborn@usb.ch   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland
Swiss National Science Foundation
Investigators
Layout table for investigator information
Principal Investigator: Annegret Muendermann, Prof. Dr. Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University Hospital Basel
Layout table for additonal information
Responsible Party: University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04128566    
Other Study ID Numbers: 2019-01315;ch19Muendermann3
First Posted: October 16, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 27, 2021
Last Verified: January 2021

Layout table for additional information
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland:
articular cartilage
mechanosensitive blood markers of articular cartilage
walking stress test
ambulatory load
articular cartilage thinning
anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury
articular cartilage quality