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Dual-task Training for Function in MCI

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04059705
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : August 16, 2019
Last Update Posted : June 16, 2021
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Nikhil Satchidanand, State University of New York at Buffalo

Brief Summary:
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and severe dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the United States about 20% of older adults have MCI. Loss of cognitive function in aging can have far-reaching and devastating impacts on functional status, independence, and quality of life. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options to slow progression of cognitive decline in aging are limited. Dual-task training; that which involves simultaneous cognitive and motor challenges, is a high-impact potential therapy to slow progressive loss of both motor and cognitive function in aging. The purpose of this trial is to examine the feasibility and therapeutic impact of a novel dual-task physical activity intervention on executive and motor functions among adults, 65 years or older, who have MCI. the investigative team anticipates that findings from this trial will inform development of larger community-based studies focused on improving function and ability to maintain independence in older age.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Mild Cognitive Impairment Behavioral: Dual-Task Training Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between the expected cognitive decline of normal aging and severe dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the United States about 20% of older adults have MCI, and approximately 15% per year of those with MCI will progress to AD. With our rapidly aging society, we are approaching a public health crisis for which we are not fully prepared. Impaired cognitive function in aging can have far-reaching and devastating impacts on functional status, ability to maintain independence, and overall quality of life. Unfortunately, the therapeutic options to slow progression of cognitive decline in aging are limited.

Dual-task training that involves simultaneous cognitive and motor challenges improves certain domains of both cognitive and motor function in older adults with MCI. However, we do not yet know the optimal methods of delivering this high-impact potential therapy in community-based settings with unique limitations and strengths. Therefore, the aims are to; 1) test the feasibility of conducting a community-based dual-task (thinking while exercising) physical activity intervention among adults, 65 years or older, with MCI; and 2) examine the impact of dual-task training on attention and motor function among adults, 65 years or older, with MCI.

To accomplish these aims the investigators will conduct an 12-week, dual-task training program using the SmartFit Multisensory Fitness System (Oxnard, CA) among older adults with MCI. Our group-based training program involves two 1-hour training sessions per week, designed to simultaneously engage the mind and body, while promoting self-efficacy. Attention and motor function will be assessed prospectively.

The investigators anticipate that findings from this trial will inform development of methods to bring evidence-based, non-invasive therapies into communities in need, in order to preserve function, independence, and quality of life well into older age.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 24 participants
Allocation: N/A
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Intervention Model Description: This study utilizes a one-group design with repeated measures.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Other
Official Title: The Impact of Dual-task Training on Attention and Motor Function in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment
Estimated Study Start Date : January 4, 2022
Estimated Primary Completion Date : January 4, 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : January 15, 2023

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Dual-Task Intervention
This study arm will receive the dual-task training program.
Behavioral: Dual-Task Training
The ThinkFIT intervention will involve two days per week participation in simultaneous cognitive and motor training activities, facilitated by the SMARTFit Multisensory FItness System.
Other Name: ThinkFIT Intervention, SMARTFit Multisensory Fitness System




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Motor Function from baseline to 12 weeks [ Time Frame: baseline, week 6, week 12 ]
    Change in motor function will be assessed prospectively using the Short Physical Performance Battery.

  2. Change in Attention from baseline to 12 weeks [ Time Frame: baseline, week 6, week 12 ]
    Attention will be assessed prospectively using the Stroop Task and Trail-making Test.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in Exercise Self Efficacy from baseline to 12 weeks [ Time Frame: baseline, week 12 ]
    Self efficacy for exercise will be assessed using the Self Efficacy for Exercise Scale. Total score is derived by summing the individual scores for each question. Scoring range for this instrument is 0 - 90 points with higher scores representing better outcomes.

  2. Outcome Expectations for Exercise from baseline to 12 weeks [ Time Frame: baseline, week 12 ]
    Outcome Expectations for exercise will be assessed using the Outcome Expectations for Exercise Scale. This instrument has 9 total items. Total score is derived by summing the responses to these items and dividing by the number of responses. Scoring is out of 9 points, with higher scores demonstrating higher outcomes expectations.



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Ages Eligible for Study:   65 Years and older   (Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 65 years of age or older
  • Male or female
  • Mild (23 - 26 points) cognitive impairment as screened by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment
  • Having no absolute contraindications to non-physician supervised exercise as guided by the American College of Sports Medicine and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Having any condition that prevents safe participation in non-physician supervised exercise as screened using the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire for Older Adults
  • Blood pressure >180 mmHg systolic or 100 mmHg diastolic at baseline
  • Presence of severe illness or disability
  • Lower body amputation
  • Cognitive Impairment beyond mild level, preventing provision of informed consent.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04059705


Contacts
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Contact: Nikhil Satchidanand, PhD 716-881-7901 ns1@buffalo.edu

Sponsors and Collaborators
State University of New York at Buffalo
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Nikhil Satchidanand, PhD University at Buffalo, State University of New York
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Responsible Party: Nikhil Satchidanand, Assistant Professor of Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04059705    
Other Study ID Numbers: STUDY00003525
First Posted: August 16, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 16, 2021
Last Verified: June 2021
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Yes
Plan Description: Investigators will allow data and supportive documents to be available to users only under a defined data-sharing agreement that enforces (a) their commitment to using the data only for research purposes and does not identify any individual research participant; (b) the commitment to secure all research data using appropriate technology; (c) prohibition of redistribution of the data to third parties, as well as proper acknowledgement of the data resource, and (d) a commitment to destroying and/or returning the data after analyses have been completed. De-identified data will be maintained on a University at Buffalo server and will be shared via encrypted devices. Co-Investigators may access the data collected as part of their aims. Investigators working on the project will have access to the data only through the principal investigator. The data will be monitored routinely to maintain security, safety, and productivity.
Supporting Materials: Study Protocol
Statistical Analysis Plan (SAP)
Informed Consent Form (ICF)
Time Frame: 1-year after first publication
Access Criteria: Final data sets will be made available upon specific request and under an authorized Data Use Agreement. This, in addition to the publications being made available via PubMed Central, will enable validation of results by recipients.

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Nikhil Satchidanand, State University of New York at Buffalo:
motor function
cognitive
attention
dual-task
physical activity
cognition
older adult
mild cognitive impairment
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Cognitive Dysfunction
Cognition Disorders
Neurocognitive Disorders
Mental Disorders