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Acne Vulgaris Related Microbiology and Serology

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04056598
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : August 14, 2019
Last Update Posted : January 6, 2021
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
CRAT
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Origimm Biotechnology GmbH

Brief Summary:
This will be an investigation to determine the quality of the serological immune responses against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in acne patients compared to healthy individuals. In particular, the investigators will measure serum antibody titers against P. acnes surface antigens, and the efficiency of antibody-mediated phagocytic killing of P. acnes.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Acne Vulgaris Diagnostic Test: Study of humoral immunity

Detailed Description:

Acne vulgaris, which affects >85% of teenagers and >10% of adults, was recently re-defined as a complex chronic disease associated with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes). Until recently, the pathogenic role of bacteria Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) has been debated due to the fact that this bacterium is also found, although in lower density, on the skin of healthy individuals. However, in the last few years, genomic sequencing and the comparative analysis of >250 P. acnes strains revealed the existence of the strains prevalently associated with severe cases of acne. In the study that analyzed more than 200 clinical isolates, it was found that 75% of the P. acnes strains that were isolated from acne lesions of acne patients, belonged to genetic type I-IA and that this group also represented 85% of the antibiotic resistant P. acnes strains isolated in the course of the study. This provided the first clear evidence for the virulent potential of P. acnes, that has been previously suspected also in some cases of eye, bone and post-operative infections. More recent research studies have identified additional virulent strains which can be distinguished based on the ribosomal DNA analysis.

Although these genetic studies have revealed the existence of virulent P. acnes strains, it is not yet clear how these strains promote disease pathogenesis and symptoms, and whether the host immune response either exaggerates or ameliorates the disease. In particular, there have been no systematic studies regarding the role of a central immunity in the protection against this pathogen.

Therefore, this will be one of the first studies to address scientifically and therapeutically important questions including:

  1. Immunogenicity of P. acnes in the acne patients compared to healthy individuals who are recovered from moderate or severe acne vulgaris.
  2. The role of antibodies in controlling colonization and acne development due to P. acnes
  3. The relationship between P. acnes genetic information and serotype classification, based on the immune recognition pattern (the degree of the similarity among genetically different strains based on the surface components recognition by the immune system) Answering these questions could support development of novel and better treatment options, which could significantly improve the outcome in acne vulgaris patients. Existing acne treatments either treat the symptoms only on skin surface (e.g. topical agents: creams, lotions), or are not offering long-term solutions (antibiotics, vitamin A derivatives). Moreover, antibiotics raise antibiotic resistance among P. acnes as well as other types of bacteria and increase the risk of super-infection by other pathogens. Vitamin A derivatives are not effective in all patients and post-therapy relapse is common; besides, they are not routinely prescribed to patients due to serious side effects.

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Study Type : Observational
Actual Enrollment : 120 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Other
Official Title: Characterization of Immune Responses Against Acne-associated Bacterium Propionibacterium Acnes - a Pilot Study
Actual Study Start Date : January 18, 2018
Actual Primary Completion Date : September 30, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : September 30, 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Acne

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
Moderate to severe acne vulgaris
Determined by the acne severity grade of IGA 2 and above
Diagnostic Test: Study of humoral immunity
Analysis: Surface antigen ELISA, recognition of living P. acnes bacteria via FACS, 16SRNA study of microbiome, SLST typing of P. acnes bacteria
Other Name: Study of skin microbiome

Mild acne vulgaris
Determined by the severity grade of IGA <2
Diagnostic Test: Study of humoral immunity
Analysis: Surface antigen ELISA, recognition of living P. acnes bacteria via FACS, 16SRNA study of microbiome, SLST typing of P. acnes bacteria
Other Name: Study of skin microbiome




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Correlation of acne vulgaris severity with humoral immunity assessed by ELISA, binding to P. acnes strains and OPK assay [ Time Frame: Serum samples will be collected at visit and samples will be investigated upon availability of all samples. Analysis will occur an average of 1 year and will reflect patient's immune status at visit. ]
    Quantitative and qualitative investigation of serum immuno globulins by (1) P. acnes surface antigen specific ELISA (EC50), (2) FACS binding (MFI) analysis on living P. acnes microorganisms of the most relevant SLST's and (3) opsono-phagocytotic killing potency (% killing) on the most important P. acnes strains in presence of human effector cells

  2. Correlation of acne vulgaris severity with skin microbiome identified in acne lesions and by facial swabs [ Time Frame: Swabs will be collected at visit and samples will be investigated upon availability of all samples. Analysis will be done an average of 1 year and will reflect patient's microbiome (on skin and in acne lesions) at visit. ]
    Swabs from skin (cheak and front head) and acne lesions (pustules) will be collected and microbiome (presence of specific microorganism) will be analyzed by NGS. SLST (SLST typing) will be applied to characterize in detail identified P. acnes strains


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Correlation of microbiome identified on skin and acne lesion samples (Outcome 2) with humoral immunity (Outcome 1) [ Time Frame: Serum and microbiome samples will be collected at patient's visit. Analysis will be done an average of 1 year and will reflect patient status at visit. ]
    We will investigate a potential correlation between results from assessment of humoral immunity (Outcome 1) and patient specific microbiome identified in skin lesions and on the skin.


Biospecimen Retention:   Samples Without DNA
Patient serum samples and facial swabs for microbiome analysis


Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 40 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Probability Sample
Study Population

Subjects for the study will be drawn from:

  • Study group: Acne patients, 18-40 years of age, currently suffering from moderate or severe acne vulgaris
  • Control group: Healthy individuals of 18-40 years of age, who recovered from moderate or severe acne vulgaris
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Acne patients (18 - 40 years of age)
  • Clinical diagnosis of medium acne vulgaris (covering more than 30% of the patient's face and loaded with comedones, pustules and acne lesions of >2 cm in size) for at least six months or longer
  • Clinical diagnosis of severe acne vulgaris (acne conglobata, sinus or cystic type acne covering most of the face (>60% of the facial surface) - IGA 3-4) for at least six months or longer
  • Age-matched healthy adults (between 18 and 40 years), with history of moderate or severe acne, but who have been free from acne for more than two years - 'free from acne' period may include minor, intermittent breakouts due to hormonal reasons, such as menstruation

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Subjects who received anti-acne antibiotic therapy less than 2 months prior to recruitment
  • Subjects who received isotretinoin therapy within the last 6 months
  • Subjects who were using hormonal contraceptives within the last 3 months

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04056598


Locations
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United States, Virginia
Clinical Research Associates of Tidewater
Norfolk, Virginia, United States, 23507
Sponsors and Collaborators
Origimm Biotechnology GmbH
CRAT
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Responsible Party: Origimm Biotechnology GmbH
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04056598    
Other Study ID Numbers: SAIRB-17-0087
First Posted: August 14, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 6, 2021
Last Verified: January 2021

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Origimm Biotechnology GmbH:
P. acnes
acne vulgaris
humoral immune response
microbiome
SLST
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Acne Vulgaris
Acneiform Eruptions
Skin Diseases
Sebaceous Gland Diseases