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Diet, Physical Activity, and Sleep Habits (DPAS)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04035421
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : July 29, 2019
Last Update Posted : July 29, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Hollie Raynor, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Brief Summary:
This study aims to observe if consistency in a young adult's schedule is related to health factors and outcomes, such as diet quality, amount of physical activity and sleep, and weight.

Condition or disease
Diet Habit

Detailed Description:

During young adulthood, patterns regarding physical activity,1,2 dietary intake,3 and weight status4 are established that track into later life and can impact health. Social and physical cues also impact patterns—particularly those cues that may influence biological and behavioral rhythms which can influence the Circadian Timing System (CTS).5 Chronotype, the timing of sleep patterns, is closely tied to the CTS as it reflects sleep in relation to the light and dark cycle, with morning-type (MT) having a pattern that should assist with better entrainment (sleep better entrained to the physical cues of light/dark).6 Research has found that chronotype is related to several areas important to health, including diet,6-11 physical activity,12-14 weight regulation.15-18. As a whole, research in this area suggests that MT individuals are more likely to consume a healthier eating pattern, be more physically active, and more successfully manage their weight. However, the research in this area for young adults is limited.

While there has been research regarding chronotype and diet, activity, and weight management, there is a paucity of research on the relationship between social cues and social rhythms, which also influence the CTS, and health related outcomes. Social rhythms, as measured by the Social Rhythm Metric (SRM), are related to chronotype, such that MT is related to a higher SRM.19-21 Due to the relationship between SRM and chronotype, and chronotype and diet, physical activity, and weight management, it would be anticipated that SRM is also related to these health outcomes. Specifically, it would be anticipated that more consistent social rhythms (higher SRM) would be related to a healthier eating pattern, greater physical activity, and weight management. However, this relationship has never been investigated.

Therefore, to better understand how social rhythms, which are triggered by social cues, are related to health, this investigation will be assessing both chronotype and SRM and collecting measures on diet quality, via food records, physical activity and sleep, via accelerometers, and anthropometrics, via BMI. The population of interest for this study is specifically young adults because young adulthood is a time period when health patterns are established for the rest of life. This study aims to observe if consistency in a young adult's schedule is related to health factors and outcomes, such as diet quality, amount of physical activity and sleep, and weight.


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Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 75 participants
Observational Model: Cohort
Time Perspective: Cross-Sectional
Official Title: Diet, Physical Activity, and Sleep Habits
Actual Study Start Date : July 13, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : November 1, 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : November 1, 2020



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Diet Quality 1 [ Time Frame: Through study completion, 1 week ]
    Healthy Eating Index Score calculated using a three-day food record

  2. Diet Quality 2 [ Time Frame: Through study completion, 1 week ]
    Total energy intake will be assessed using a three-day food record

  3. Physical Activity 1 [ Time Frame: Through study completion, 1 week ]
    Minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity will be assessed using SenseWear Armbands

  4. Physical Activity 2 [ Time Frame: Through study completion, 1 week ]
    Energy expenditure from moderate to vigorous physical activity will be assessed using SenseWear Armbands

  5. Sleep 1 [ Time Frame: Through study completion, 1 week ]
    Length of sleep will be assessed using SenseWear Armbands

  6. Sleep 2 [ Time Frame: Through study completion, 1 week ]
    Sleep efficiency will be assessed using SenseWear Armbands


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Body Mass Index (BMI) [ Time Frame: Baseline appointment ]
    BMI will be calculated using height and weight measurements

  2. Body Composition [ Time Frame: Baseline appointment ]
    Body fat percentage will be assessed using the Body Composition Analyzer TBF-300 (TANITA Corporation, Tokyo, Japan)

  3. Chronotype [ Time Frame: Baseline appointment ]
    Chronotype will be assessed using the Composite Score for Morningness



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Young adult between the ages of 18 and 35 years, taking classes and/or working, able to engage in physical activity, and having no dietary restrictions.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Between the ages of 18-35 years
  • Able to pass the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire for Everyone (PAR-Q+) indicating that they have no health conditions that limit their ability to engage in physical activity
  • Access to an email address and internet each day during their participation
  • An town when all measures are collected
  • Taking classes and/or working a job when all measures are collected

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Pregnant
  • Allergy to stainless steel, making the participant unable to wear Body Media Armband
  • Dietary restrictions of any kind
  • Shift work, here defined as having to work a shift for any period of time between the hours of 12 am and 6 am

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT04035421


Contacts
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Contact: Grace Hawkins 865-974-0752 heal@utk.edu

Locations
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United States, Tennessee
Healthy Eating and Activity Lab, University of Tennessee Recruiting
Knoxville, Tennessee, United States, 37996
Contact: Hollie A Raynor, PhD RD LDN    865-974-6259    hraynor@utk.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Hollie Raynor, PhD University of Tennessee Knoxville
  Study Documents (Full-Text)

Documents provided by Hollie Raynor, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville:
Informed Consent Form  [PDF] July 23, 2019


Publications:

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Responsible Party: Hollie Raynor, Professor, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04035421     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: UTK IRB-19-05178-XP
First Posted: July 29, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 29, 2019
Last Verified: July 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Hollie Raynor, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville:
Social Rhythm Metric
Chronotype
Young adult