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Effect of One Minute of Resistance Exercise Per Day on Muscular Strength (The ONE Study)

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03981250
Recruitment Status : Suspended (Covid-19)
First Posted : June 10, 2019
Last Update Posted : September 30, 2020
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Professor Jason Gill, University of Glasgow

Brief Summary:
This study will evaluate the effect of one minute of resistance exercise per day on muscular strength in adults. Half of the participants will undergo a 12-week home-based resistance exercise programme, while the other half will continue their usual lifestyle behaviour.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Exercise Behavioral: 12-week home-based resistance exercise programme Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

A resistance training programme can lead to a variety of health benefits including increases in muscle size and strength. Other potential health benefits of resistance training include reduction of body fat, increased metabolic rate, improve insulin sensitivity, blood glucose tolerance and blood lipid profiles. Meta-analyses indicate that while performing resistance exercise two or more times per week of resistance exercise per muscle group appears to be optimal to maximise strength gains, a single set of resistance exercise per muscle group per week, if performed to failure is sufficient to induce substantial strength changes.

The current physical activity guidelines recommend undertaking muscle strengthening activities involving major muscle groups two days a week or more, as well as undertaking at least 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity physical activity (or 75 minutes per week of vigorous intensity physical activity). However, only small portion of the population achieves the muscle strengthening aspect of the guidelines. As lack of time is often cited as a reason not to engage in physical activity, this study is seeking to investigate a low time-commitment approach to resistance exercise which could increase muscular strength. To address this, the present study will to split a typical single session of resistance exercise involving several exercises across different muscle groups into separate 1-minute micro-sessions where a different muscle group is exercised on each day of the week. The aim is to determine the effects of a one-minute-per-day home-based resistance exercise training on muscular strength.

The study is a randomized control trial in which the control group will continue their lifestyle behaviour and will be asked not to increase their physical activity levels and the exercise group will perform a 12-week home-based resistance exercise programme, involving doing one minute of resistance exercise per day on six days of the week, with a different exercise performed on each day. All participants will be measured at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 56 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Randomized controlled trial.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Masking Description: There is no masking due to intervention characteristics (exercise training programme).
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: The ONE Study: Effect of One Minute of Resistance Exercise Per Day on Muscular Strength
Actual Study Start Date : June 20, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : October 28, 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 31, 2021

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: Control Group
The control group will be asked to keep their lifestyle behaviour and not increase their physical activity levels during the study period.
Experimental: Exercise Group
The exercise group will engage in a home-based resistance exercise intervention for 12 weeks. They will perform 6 exercises, one each day for one minute, for 6 days a week.
Behavioral: 12-week home-based resistance exercise programme
Participants will perform 6 exercises (press-ups, squats, squat jumps, plank, upright row and seated row) for one minute, aiming for the maximum number of repetitions. Participants will perform one exercise per day, for 6 days a week, for 12 weeks.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Muscle strength [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 4 weeks ]
    Change in 1-RM (one repetition maximum) (kg) for bench press, leg press and lat pull down (kg).

  2. Muscle strength [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 8 weeks ]
    Change in 1-RM (one repetition maximum) (kg) for bench press, leg press and lat pull down (kg).

  3. Muscle strength [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 12 weeks ]
    Change in 1-RM (one repetition maximum) (kg) for bench press, leg press and lat pull down (kg).


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Muscle endurance [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 4 weeks ]
    Change in maximal number of repetitions with a load of 50% of baseline 1-RM for bench press, leg press and lateral pull down.

  2. Muscle endurance [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 8 weeks ]
    Change in maximal number of repetitions with a load of 50% of baseline 1-RM for bench press, leg press and lateral pull down.

  3. Muscle endurance [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 12 weeks ]
    Change in maximal number of repetitions with a load of 50% of baseline 1-RM for bench press, leg press and lateral pull down.

  4. Weight [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 4 weeks ]
    Change in weight (kg).

  5. Weight [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 8 weeks ]
    Change in weight (kg).

  6. Weight [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 12 weeks ]
    Change in weight (kg).

  7. Waist [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 4 weeks ]
    Change in waist circumference (cm).

  8. Waist [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 8 weeks ]
    Change in waist circumference (cm).

  9. Waist [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 12 weeks ]
    Change in waist circumference (cm).

  10. Body composition [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 4 weeks ]
    Change in fat mass and free fat mass measured by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA).

  11. Body composition [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 8 weeks ]
    Change in fat mass and free fat mass measured by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA).

  12. Body composition [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 12 weeks ]
    Change in fat mass and free fat mass measured by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA).

  13. Muscle thickness [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 12 weeks ]
    Change in muscle thickness of vastus lateralis (mm) measured with ultrasound.

  14. Grip strength [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 4 weeks ]
    Change in grip strength (kg) measured using a hand grip dynamometer

  15. Grip strength [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 8 weeks ]
    Change in grip strength (kg) measured using a hand grip dynamometer

  16. Grip strength [ Time Frame: Change between baseline and 12 weeks ]
    Change in grip strength (kg) measured using a hand grip dynamometer



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 65 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Aged 18-65 years

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Diabetes
  • Uncontrolled hypertension (blood pressure > 150/90 on medication).
  • History of cardiovascular disease
  • Undertaking more than 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous physical activity or undertaking any resistance exercise.
  • Other significant illness that would prevent the participant to undertake physical activity.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03981250


Locations
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United Kingdom
University of Glasgow
Glasgow, United Kingdom, G12 8TA
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Glasgow
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Jason Gill, PhD University of Glasgow
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Responsible Party: Professor Jason Gill, Professor, University of Glasgow
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03981250    
Other Study ID Numbers: 200180137
First Posted: June 10, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: September 30, 2020
Last Verified: September 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Professor Jason Gill, University of Glasgow:
Resistance training
Strength Training
Muscle Strength
voluntary failure