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Trial record 13 of 661 for:    SMS

SMS Messages to Increase Child Egg Consumption, a C-rct in Nepal

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03926689
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : April 24, 2019
Last Update Posted : August 15, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
University of South Carolina
University College, London
International Food Policy Research Institute
FHI 360
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Digital Broadcast Initiative Equal Access
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Helen Keller International

Brief Summary:

Eggs are well-known to be a balanced source of protein, energy, fatty acids, and micronutrients and increasingly identified as an opportunity to improve nutrition of poor populations. Few implementation studies have been done globally, and none in South Asia, to assess the effectiveness of using behavior change programs to motivate households to increase egg consumption. Egg consumption is particularly poor in Nepal, but the government and development partners are implementing at scale policies and programs to address poor diets and other determinants of undernutrition, which is persistently high in Nepal.

This cluster-randomized controlled trial (c-RCT) aims to help address the gap in the evidence base regarding how to improve egg consumption. The c-RCT will evaluate the effectiveness of using short message service (SMS) messaging, layered into a large-scale behavior change program, to improve egg consumption and dietary diversity among children 1 to 2 years of age. A two-arm trial will be used to compare the following two strategies: 1) Suaahara II standard multi-sectoral nutrition interventions without any text messages and 2) Suaahara II standard multi sectoral nutrition interventions plus a SMS message campaign targeting all adult household members of households in the 1000-day period between conception and a child's second birthday.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Dietary Habits Behavioral: SMS messages Behavioral: Standard SII SBCC Not Applicable

  Show Detailed Description

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 6700 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Quadruple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Evaluating the Impact of Sending SMS Messages to Increase Egg Consumption Among Children One 1-2 Years of Age, a Cluster-randomized Controlled Trial in Kanchanpur, Nepal
Estimated Study Start Date : August 25, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : October 5, 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : October 5, 2020

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Suaahara II Standard + SMS
Suaahara II standard multi sectoral nutrition interventions (home visits, radio program, etc.) Suaahara II monthly SMS campaign targeting all adult household members of households in the 1000-day period between conception and a child's second birthday
Behavioral: SMS messages
A package of at least monthly SMS messages delivered to all adults in households with an individual in the 1000-day period between pregnancy and a child turning 2 years of age.

Behavioral: Standard SII SBCC
Home visits/IPC; community events including food demo and key life events; and Bhanchhin Aama radio program episodes

Active Comparator: Suaahara II Standard
Suaahara II standard multi sectoral nutrition interventions (home visits, radio program, etc.)
Behavioral: Standard SII SBCC
Home visits/IPC; community events including food demo and key life events; and Bhanchhin Aama radio program episodes




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Child egg consumption [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in prevalence of any egg consumption in 24 hours prior to survey among children 12 to 23 months of age.

  2. Child minimum dietary diversity [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in prevalence of obtaining minimum dietary diversity score (at least four of seven food groups) in previous 24 hours for children aged 12-23 months of age


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Child dietary diversity score [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in mean dietary diversity (range:0 lowest - 7 highest) in previous 24 hours for children 12 to 23 months of age

  2. Adult caregiver egg consumption [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in prevalence of any egg consumption in previous 24 hours among adults residing in a household with a child 12 to 23 months of age

  3. Adult minimum dietary diversity [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in prevalence of obtaining minimum dietary diversity score (at least five of ten food groups) in previous 24 hours among adults residing in a household with a child 12 to 23 months of age

  4. Adult dietary diversity score [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in mean dietary diversity (range:0 lowest -10 highest) in previous 24 hours for adults residing in a household with a child 12 to 23 months of age

  5. Infant and Young Child Feeding knowledge [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in mean knowledge score (range: 0-8) on core infant and young child feeding practices among adults residing in a household with a child 12 to 23 months of age

  6. Health Mothers' Groups participation [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in prevalence of any participation in the last 3 months in a Female Community Health Volunteer-led group, by the mother of the survey child 12-23 months of age

  7. Health Mothers' Groups participation frequency [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in number of times participated in the last 3 months in an Female Community Health Volunteer-led group by the mother of the survey child 12-23 months of age

  8. Adult Bhanchhin Aama listenership [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in prevalence of any listenership in the last 3 months to Bhanchhin Aama, Suaahara II radio program, in the previous three months by any adult household member

  9. Adult Bhanchhin Aama listenership frequency [ Time Frame: baseline and 12 months later ]
    Change in number of times listened to Bhanchhin Aama, Suaahara II radio program, in the previous three months by any adult household member



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Ages Eligible for Study:   15 Years and older   (Child, Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • household must have resided in the study cluster for the previous 12 months;
  • household must have at least 1 child 12-23 completed months of age who was not acutely ill the previous day and does not have a disability preventing normal feeding; if a household has more than one child aged 12-23 months, but the children have different mothers, each mother is an eligible trial participant
  • household must have at least one adult (18 years or older) residing in the household and owning a mobile phone
  • household must be able and willing to register the phone number for the intervention and consent to inclusion in the survey for the trial.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • a few clusters will be excluded from the study given their lack of representation of the overall study area (e.g., 2 clusters with less than 150 households which are all landless and without government resources; 1 cluster which is exclusively a Tamang population; and 1 cluster which is the main urban area)
  • in the rare occurrence that in an eligible household, a mother has more than one child aged 12-23.9 months, then the youngest will be chosen in the trial and the other child excluded

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03926689


Locations
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Nepal
Suaahara II/Helen Keller International, Nepal Not yet recruiting
Patan, Nepal
Contact: Kenda Cunningham, DrPH       kcunningham@hki.org   
Contact: Pooja Pandey Rana, MSc       ppandey@hki.org   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Helen Keller International
University of South Carolina
University College, London
International Food Policy Research Institute
FHI 360
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
Digital Broadcast Initiative Equal Access

Publications:
Barnett, I., Scott, N., Batchelor, S., Haddad, L., 2016. Dial "N" for nutrition? A Landscape Analysis of What We Know about m-Nutrition, m-Agriculture and m-Development.
Cunningham, K., Headey, D., Singh, A., Karmacharya, C., Rana, P.P., 2017. Maternal and Child Nutrition in Nepal: Examining drivers of progress from the mid-1990s to 2010s. Glob. Food Sec. 13, 30-37. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gfs.2017.02.001
FAO and FHI 360, 2016. Minimum Dietary Diversity for Women: A guide for measurement. http://www.fao.org/3/a-i5486e.pdf
Houston, R., Shresha, M.B., Pomeroy, A., Wun, J., Sharma, I., 2014. Pathways To Better Nutrition Case Study: Nepal Strategic Background Report. Arlington, VA. https://www.popline.org/node/635850
Mildon, A., 2016. Use of Mobile Phone Technology to Support Improved Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices in Low-and Middle-income Countries: A Scoping Review. Univ. Toronto. University of Toronto. https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/bitstream/.../Mildon_Alison_201611_MSc_thesis.pdf
Ministry of Health 2017. Nepal Demographic and Health Survey 2016. Kathmandu.
Parajuli, J., Haynes, K.E., 2018. Cellular mobile telephony in Nepal. Lett. Spat. Resour. Sci. 11, 209-222. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12076-018-0212-7
World Health Organization, 2010. Indicators for assessing infant and young child feeding practices: part 1 definitions. Geneva.

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Responsible Party: Helen Keller International
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03926689     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: SIIegg2019-2020
First Posted: April 24, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 15, 2019
Last Verified: February 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Helen Keller International:
egg consumption
dietary diversity
complementary feeding
South Asia
SMS