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Plant-based Dietary Protein and Resistance-training Adaptations

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03907059
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : April 8, 2019
Last Update Posted : April 8, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Bruno Gualano, University of Sao Paulo

Brief Summary:
Dietary protein consumption maximizes the anabolic response during resistance training (RT) by triggering muscle protein synthesis and providing the indispensable amino acids for a net positive protein balance. Leucine is considered the key amino acid in this process, suggesting that differences in protein quality may influence RT-induced gains in muscle mass and strength. In general, plant-based protein sources have lower leucine concentrations than animal-based protein sources and human skeletal muscle. In this respect, despite acute evidence on lower anabolic properties of plant- vs. animal-based protein, the effects of an exclusive plant-based dietary protein diet on RT-induced adaptations are currently unknown.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Healthy Dietary Supplement: whey protein Dietary Supplement: soy protein Not Applicable

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 38 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Triple (Care Provider, Investigator, Outcomes Assessor)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Does Exclusive Consumption of Plant-based Dietary Protein Impair Resistance Training-induced Muscle Adaptations?
Actual Study Start Date : March 31, 2017
Actual Primary Completion Date : October 16, 2018
Actual Study Completion Date : October 19, 2018

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Dietary Proteins

Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Omnivorous
Interventions: Daily protein intake was adjusted to 1.6g/kg/day via supplementation (whey) + 12 weeks of resistance training
Dietary Supplement: whey protein
supplementation individually adjusted to 1.6g/kg/day

Experimental: Vegan
Interventions: Daily protein intake was adjusted to 1.6g/kg/day via supplementation (soy) + 12 weeks of resistance training
Dietary Supplement: soy protein
supplementation individually adjusted to 1.6g/kg/day




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Muscle cross-sectional area [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    assessed by mode-B ultrasound

  2. Muscle strength [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    assessed by leg-press one-maximum-repetition


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Leg lean mass [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    assessed by Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry

  2. fiber cross-sectional area [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    assessed by muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis)



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 35 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy young men
  • Vegans ≥ 1 y or omnivorous subjects
  • Physically active but no resistance-trained subjects
  • Without any chronic injury that impairs resistance training performance
  • Protein intake > 0.8 g/protein/kg body weight

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Use of creatine or beta-alanine supplements for the last 3 months
  • Use of proteins and/or amino acids supplements for the last 1 month
  • Engagement in specific dietary restrictions
  • Previous use of anabolic steroids
  • Engagement in any training program

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03907059


Locations
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Brazil
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil, 05508-030
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Sao Paulo
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Hamilton Roschel, Professor University of Sao Paulo

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Responsible Party: Bruno Gualano, Professor, University of Sao Paulo
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03907059     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 54014116.9.0000.5391
First Posted: April 8, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: April 8, 2019
Last Verified: April 2019

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Bruno Gualano, University of Sao Paulo:
protein source
hypertrophy
resistance training
plant-based protein
omnivorous