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Trial record 51 of 3404 for:    Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | Pain

Acupuncture Relief for Chronic Neck Pain

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03859011
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : March 1, 2019
Last Update Posted : August 14, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Utica College
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of Florida

Brief Summary:
This study will measure the effectiveness of "usual care" for chronic neck pain as defined in the protocol, compared with usual care plus acupuncture for chronic neck pain. This study's hypothesis is that combining acupuncture with usual care will show a clinically relevant increase in the effectiveness of the integrated therapies, compared with usual care alone. This study will also measure the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for chronic neck pain. the hypothesis is that in economic evaluation terms, integrating acupuncture with usual care will not create significant overall costs, relative to the benefits which study patients obtain.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Neck Pain, Posterior Other: Acupuncture Other: Usual Care Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Low back and neck pain accounts for the third-highest amount of U.S. healthcare spending, estimated at $87.6 billion annually. Moderate quality evidence already exists showing acupuncture's effectiveness for low back pain. Other than a few mostly foreign randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on acupuncture for neck pain, there are fewer quality studies on acupuncture's effectiveness for neck pain than for low back pain. The safety of acupuncture is well established. The risk of hematoma or infection due to acupuncture is lower than with venipuncture.

There is a lack of evidence on the cost-effectiveness relationship of this treatment strategy in the United States. A PubMed search found only three cost-effectiveness analyses of acupuncture for neck pain studies, all done abroad.

Since Medicare and several large private insurance companies still do not cover acupuncture, patient access to this therapy is significantly limited by out-of-pocket cost. A quality comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness study on acupuncture for chronic neck pain is needed from several perspectives. From the patient perspective, such a study would inform patients and providers in decision-making regarding integrating acupuncture in the care plan. From a third-party payer perspective, such a study would inform insurance companies whether it is cost-effective for them to cover acupuncture for this specific diagnosis. From a societal perspective, such a study would inform policy decision-makers whether acupuncture is a sound "investment" to better make resource allocation decisions for its citizens.

  1. The primary aim of this trial is to explore the comparative effectiveness of acupuncture plus "usual care" vs. usual care alone for reducing chronic neck pain.
  2. The secondary aim of this trial is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for this condition from multiple perspectives.

The primary endpoint will be determined by comparing the mean change score on the neck disability index from baseline (month 0) to the treatment completion (month 2.5), and 3.5 months after completion of the acupuncture treatment (month 6) between groups.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 60 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Randomized Control Trial
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Acupuncture for Chronic Neck Pain: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Actual Study Start Date : August 1, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 1, 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : June 1, 2020

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Acupuncture
After obtaining baseline data and questionnaires, patients will receive usual care (for example physical therapy, oral pain medication or ointments), plus acupuncture 2X/week over 2 weeks, then once per week over 8 weeks (12 total treatments over 10 weeks), then no acupuncture between 10 weeks and 6 months. After treatment is completed, final measurement instruments are applied at 6 months. Questionnaires will be readministered at 2.5 and 6 months.
Other: Acupuncture

Patients will have DBC Spring Ten acupuncture needles (manufactured in China) manually inserted bilaterally on five standardized acupuncture points according to the treatment points of GB20, BL10, BL11, SI3, BL62 at 6-8 mm depth for 20 minutes each using a tonification technique to elicit a de qi response.

After those needles are removed, the number of additional needles and additional acupuncture points used will be chosen at the acupuncturist's discretion.


Other: Usual Care
Physical therapy, oral medications and topical ointments pre the discretion of the primary physician

Placebo Comparator: "Usual" care
After obtaining baseline data and questionnaires, patients will receive usual care (for example physical therapy, oral pain medication or ointments) for 6 months. Questionnaires will be readministered at 2.5 and 6 months. After the control phase the participants will continue usual care (for example physical therapy, oral pain medication or ointments), plus acupuncture 2X/week over 2 weeks, then once per week over 8 weeks (12 total treatments over 10 weeks, 8.5 months), then no acupuncture between 8.5 months and 12 months.
Other: Acupuncture

Patients will have DBC Spring Ten acupuncture needles (manufactured in China) manually inserted bilaterally on five standardized acupuncture points according to the treatment points of GB20, BL10, BL11, SI3, BL62 at 6-8 mm depth for 20 minutes each using a tonification technique to elicit a de qi response.

After those needles are removed, the number of additional needles and additional acupuncture points used will be chosen at the acupuncturist's discretion.


Other: Usual Care
Physical therapy, oral medications and topical ointments pre the discretion of the primary physician




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in the Neck Disability Index (NDI) [ Time Frame: Baseline; Month 2.5; Month 3.5; Month 6 ]
    The NDI will be used to measure pain and functional disability in the neck, and is the most widely used questionnaire to evaluate cervical pain and dysfunction in daily life. It consists of 10 questions, with a 6-point Likert scale from 0 to 5 points. The overall score ranges from 0 to 50 points, and a higher score indicates a greater degree of perceived functional disability.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NRS) [ Time Frame: Baseline; Month 2.5; Month 3.5; Month 6 ]
    Participants will be instructed to report the intensity of neck pain experienced within the past week on a linear scale of 0 to 10 (0, no pain; 10, pain as bad as it could be).

  2. Change in EuroQol 5-Dimension (EQ-5D-5L) Questionnaire [ Time Frame: Baseline; Month 2.5; Month 6 ]
    The EQ-5D-5L consists of five categories (mobility, personal care, daily activities, pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression), and each category contains five statements describing personal health status10. Each dimension can be score on one of five levels: no problems, slight problems, moderate problems, severe problems and extreme problems. Participants will be instructed to select the most appropriate one among the five statements. The responses represent a health state, which then be converted into a utility score between 0 and 1, where 0 represents death and 1 represents perfect health.

  3. Change in PROMIS® Scale v1.2. PROMIS® (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System) [ Time Frame: Baseline; Month 2.5; Month 6 ]
    Patient questionnaire be used to evaluate and monitor physical, mental and social health. The ten-question assessment uses a 5-point Likert scale with 5=never and 1= always. The higher score indicates better health.

  4. Change in Acupuncture Expectancy Scale [ Time Frame: Baseline; Month 2.5; Month 6 ]
    This four-question assessment uses a 5-point Likert scale with 1=not at all and 5= Completely. The higher score indicates a higher expectation that acupuncture will be helpful.

  5. Change in Cost Effectiveness [ Time Frame: Baseline; Month 2.5; Month 6 ]
    Patient questionnaire to be used to evaluate the direct non health care costs of therapy



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 80 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Have Grade II neck pain with no signs or symptoms of major structural pathology but major interference with activities of daily living.18 Pain will be more than 4 out of 10 on the numeric pain rating scale (NRS) at the time of screening and a diagnosis of non-specific neck pain (axial and muscular neck pain, without radicular symptoms, is included) by a clinician based on history taking and physical examination, including any imaging examinations. Neck pain is defined as "pain, ache, or discomfort" in the area between the occiput and the third thoracic vertebra and between the medial borders of the scapulae.
  • Have persistent or recurrent neck pain lasting longer than 3 months, and occurring at least once per week
  • Have had at least one physician or emergency department visit for neck pain within the past 3 months AND be currently taking pain medication as prescribed, such as:

    • Acetaminophen
    • NSAIDS
    • Narcotics (≤ 15 OME)
    • Robaxin (or equivalent)
  • Be able to maintain a prone position for at least 20 minutes per the intervention methodology
  • Be able to provide written informed consent.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Have radicular pain in the upper extremity with the distribution of a particular nerve root;
  • Have one of the following neurological abnormalities:

    1. paresthesia (sensory deficits),
    2. positive sign on a special test: shoulder abduction relief sign test (Bakody sign), Spurling test,
    3. hyporeflexia of the deep tendon reflex,
    4. pathological reflex: Hoffman sign, ankle clonus, Babinski sign, or
    5. muscle atrophy;
  • Have major spinal pathology such as neoplasm, spinal fractures, myelopathy, spondylitis, systemic inflammatory diseases, other non-mechanical cause of neck pain and congenital abnormality,
  • Have a history of spinal surgery or be pre-scheduled for such surgery during the study;
  • Report pain in another region that is more severe than the neck pain;
  • Have a body mass index greater than 40;
  • Report a history of hypersensitive reaction to previous acupuncture treatment, metal allergy, keloid, severe atopy, open skin sores, and other skin hypersensitivities;
  • Have hemorrhagic disease and/or factors that can affect hemostasis, such as anti-coagulant or anti-platelet drug use;
  • Have uncontrolled diabetes, or major cardiovascular disease;
  • Have a history of neurotic or major psychiatric disability or cognitive instability;
  • Have a current or recent (within the past 6 months) history of alcoholism, or or current or recent history of drug abuse, including abusing opioids or other controlled pain medication;
  • Have a medical disorder that would contraindicate physical therapy;
  • Have head or neck cancer, or neck pain associated with ongoing radiation treatment to the head or neck;
  • Be involved in known litigation related to neck pain;
  • Report current use of dry needling trigger point therapy;
  • Pregnancy;
  • Report a recent history of prior acupuncture treatment within the past six months.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03859011


Contacts
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Contact: Kelly Flynn 904-244-4378 Kelly.Flynn@jax.ufl.edu

Locations
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United States, Florida
UF Health Jacksonville Recruiting
Jacksonville, Florida, United States, 32209
UF Jax ASCENT Recruiting
Jacksonville, Florida, United States, 32209
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Florida
Utica College
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Paul Mongan, MD Professor, Department of Anesthesiology

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Responsible Party: University of Florida
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03859011     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: IRB201900266
First Posted: March 1, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 14, 2019
Last Verified: August 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by University of Florida:
acupuncture
pain
disability

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Neck Pain
Pain
Neurologic Manifestations
Signs and Symptoms