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Effects of Chronic Energy Drink Consumption on Cardiometabolic Endpoints

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03840863
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : February 15, 2019
Last Update Posted : November 6, 2020
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University of the Pacific

Brief Summary:

Many people use energy drinks (EDs) regularly, but the overall health concerns are still unknown. There are many energy drink products that contain a mixture of caffeine and other energy-boosting ingredients and supplements which can affect parameters related to the heart, blood pressure and blood glucose. Several previous studies have shown that energy drinks may affect heart rhythm and blood pressure significantly. As energy drinks are sugar-sweetened beverages, long-term use may also affect the body's metabolism, including cholesterol, blood sugars, and weight.

The purpose of this study is to learn if drinking energy drinks everyday may affect a person's cardiometabolic health.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Cardiovascular Diseases Dietary Supplement: Commercially-Available Energy Drink Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

The popularity of energy drinks (EDs) have increased over the last few decades due to their purported benefits as mental and physical performance enhancements. While caffeine is a major ingredient in most EDs (ranging from 80 mg to 500 mg per drink), they may also contain various supplements, such as guarana, taurine, ginseng, B vitamins, gluconolactone, yohimbe, carnitine, and bitter orange, as well as high amount of sugar (ranging from 25-50 grams). The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cited that a daily intake of 400 mg caffeine (approximately 4-5 cups of coffee) in adults is generally safe and not associated with dangerous, negative effects. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reported a doubling of emergency department visits involving EDs from 10,068 visits in 2007 to 20,783 visits in 2011. Commonly reported adverse reactions include insomnia, nervousness, headache, tachycardia, and seizures. Currently, the health effects of long-term ED use remain unknown.

This study is a proof-of-concept, prospective trial that aims to evaluate the effects of chronic ED consumption on cardiometabolic parameters in a healthy population. Subjects will consume two cans (16 oz.) of an energy drink daily for 4 weeks. The study will assess any changes in blood pressure (BP), electrocardiographic (ECG) parameters, blood glucose, cholesterol, weight, body mass index (BMI), and body fat composition before and after consuming EDs for 4 weeks.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 15 participants
Allocation: N/A
Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Effects of Chronic Energy Drink Consumption on Cardiometabolic Endpoints
Actual Study Start Date : March 6, 2019
Actual Primary Completion Date : June 20, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : July 30, 2020

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Commercially-Available Energy drink
Healthy volunteers willing to consume two cans of energy drinks (16 oz./can) daily for 4 weeks
Dietary Supplement: Commercially-Available Energy Drink
Participant will consume 2 cans of an energy drink (16 oz./can) per day. One in the morning and one in the afternoon.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in blood pressure before and 1 hour after energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 1 hour ]
    Measuring acute changes in peripheral systolic blood pressure before and 1 hour after energy drink consumption

  2. Change in blood pressure before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 4 weeks ]
    Measuring chronic changes in peripheral systolic blood pressure before and 4 weeks after energy drink consumption


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in QTc Interval before and after 1 hour of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 1 hour ]
    Measuring change in QTc interval via electrocardiogram before and after 1 hour of energy drink consumption

  2. Change in QTc Interval before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 4 weeks ]
    Measuring change in QTc interval via electrocardiogram before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption

  3. Change in fasting blood glucose before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 4 weeks ]
    Measuring the change in fasting blood glucose before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption

  4. Change in fasting lipid panel parameters before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 4 weeks ]
    Measuring the changes in total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglyceride (TG), and calculated low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption

  5. Change in Body Mass Index before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 4 weeks ]
    Measuring the change in Body Mass Index (BMI) before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption

  6. Change in Body Fat Analysis before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 4 weeks ]
    Measuring the changes in Body Fat Analysis before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption, including percentage of body fat, fat mass, muscle mass, and fat in trunk

  7. Change in Serum Creatinine before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption [ Time Frame: 4 weeks ]
    Measuring the change in Serum Creatinine before and after 4 weeks of energy drink consumption



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 40 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Healthy adults aged 18 - 40 years
  • Participants willing to adhere to study drink schedule (28 days)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Naïve caffeine consumers (< 2 cups of coffee [or equivalent caffeine intake] per week)
  • Chronic medical conditions including cardiovascular disease (known history of cardiac arrhythmias, family history of premature sudden cardiac death before age 60, cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis), smoking, renal or hepatic dysfunction
  • Prolonged corrected QT (QTc) interval
  • History of substance abuse, including alcohol
  • Concurrent use of prescription drugs or over-the-counter products that may interact with study drinks (with the exception of oral contraceptives that have been used for over 1 month)
  • Baseline Blood Pressure greater than 140/90 mmHg
  • Baseline fasting blood glucose greater than 126 mg/dL or random blood glucose greater than 200 mg/dL
  • Females only: pregnancy or lactation, or planning to get pregnant within next 28 days

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03840863


Locations
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United States, California
University of the Pacific
Stockton, California, United States, 95211
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of the Pacific
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: May Chen, PharmD University of the Pacific
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Responsible Party: University of the Pacific
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03840863    
Other Study ID Numbers: 19-02
First Posted: February 15, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: November 6, 2020
Last Verified: November 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by University of the Pacific:
Energy Drink
Blood Pressure
Arrhythmia
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Cardiovascular Diseases