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Pediatric Reporting of Adult-Onset Genomic Results

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03832985
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : February 6, 2019
Last Update Posted : February 6, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Adam Buchanan, Geisinger Clinic

Brief Summary:
The Investigators will conduct a longitudinal, mixed-methods cohort study to assess primary and secondary psychosocial outcomes among 705 MyCode pediatric participants and their parents, and health behaviors of parents whose children receive an adult- or pediatric-onset genomic result. Data will be gathered via quantitative surveys using validated measures of distress, family functioning, quality of life, body image, perceived cancer/heart disease risk, genetic counseling satisfaction, genomics knowledge, and adjustment to genetic information; qualitative interviews with adolescents and parents; and electronic health records review of parents' cascade testing uptake and initiation of risk reduction behaviors. The investigators will also conduct empirical and theoretical legal research to examine the loss of chance doctrine and its applicability to genomic research.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome Lynch Syndrome Familial Hypercholesterolemia Genetic: Receive an adult-onset result Genetic: Receive a pediatric-onset result Genetic: Control - No Result Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

The Investigators propose a longitudinal, observational cohort study using mixed methods to compare change in psychosocial outcomes and health behaviors among three study groups of pediatric MyCode participants and their parents:

  1. Group 1 - those with a pathogenic variant in a gene associated with adult onset of disease (n=17 adolescents, 50 parents)
  2. Group 2 - those with a pathogenic variant in a gene associated with pediatric onset of disease or with risk reduction interventions that begin in childhood (n=53 adolescents, 160 parents)
  3. Group 3 - those who do not receive a genomic result (n=105 adolescents, 320 parents)

The Investigators will use the current existing MyCode list of actionable genes designated as actionable by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Parents of pediatric MyCode participants will be offered the opportunity to participate in the study prior to learning to which group they belong. Consistent with Geisinger policy, children ages 7-17 will be asked to give assent to participate. If a child does not want to assent to participate, he or she will not be enrolled into the study (regardless of their parents' preference regarding enrollment). Parents of children who do not give assent will be ineligible to participate. Parents who decline participation when their child is suspected to have a pathogenic adult-onset result will have their child's sample held for clinical confirmation until the child reaches age 18 years. Parents who decline participation when their child is suspected to have a pathogenic pediatric-onset result will proceed to clinical confirmation of the result and, if confirmed, follow the established clinical return procedure. This recruitment approach is consistent with the MyCode philosophy of notifying participants of actionable findings. Parent-participants will be asked to assess psychosocial outcomes for themselves and for their children. Consistent with co-investigator Angela Bradbury's research on the experience of adolescent girls from families at increased risk for breast cancer, pediatric participants ages 11-17 years at enrollment (i.e., adolescents) will also participate in quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews.

Psychosocial variables such as anxiety and depression will be assessed among parents and adolescents at enrollment (T1), after which those suspected of having a pathogenic variant will proceed to clinical confirmation of that variant. Those whose variant is confirmed clinically as pathogenic or likely pathogenic will then be scheduled for a disclosure appointment. These appointments will be conducted by a genetic counselor and psychologist, who will perform psychosocial assessment, conduct therapeutic consults as needed, and conduct periodic psychosocial assessments of adolescent participants with adult-onset results. Participants with suspected pathogenic variants that are not confirmed clinically and participants without a suspected pathogenic variant will be scheduled for a study visit to notify them of their group status and remind them to follow up with their pediatrician if they have significant personal or family history of cancer or heart disease.

Validated surveys will be used to measure outcomes in each study group at 1 month (T3), 6 months (T4) and 12 months (T5) post-disclosure visit. The investigators will conduct qualitative interviews with a subset of at least 45 participants in each of the two study groups who receive a genomic result to better understand the lived experience of adolescents with an actionable genomic finding and their parents. Data collection will continue after the grant funding ends because of Geisinger Research Division's commitment to following the study cohort. To address the legal specific aim, Dr. Wagner will lead the study team's legal experts in examining and monitoring the loss of chance doctrine in medical malpractice cases in federal and state courts across the United States and in monitoring legislative developments relating to the loss of chance doctrine as it applies to returning adult-onset genomic results to children.


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 705 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description:

The study sample will be drawn from all pediatric MyCode participants (ages 0-17 years). At least one parent will be enrolled for each pediatric participant. Parents of children ages 0-10 years at enrollment will participate in data collection; parents of children ages 11-17 years at enrollment and their children will participate in data collection. Group 3 participants will be frequency matched to Groups 1 and 2 participants on age and sex.

Individuals who have already had genetic counseling for any of the MyCode target conditions as part of their routine clinical care will be excluded to avoid confounding study findings.

Quantitative data collection will be on 705 (530 parents and 175 adolescents).

Masking: None (Open Label)
Masking Description: No one is prevented from having knowledge of this project.
Primary Purpose: Health Services Research
Official Title: Reporting Adult-Onset Genomic Results to Pediatric Biobank Participants and Parents
Estimated Study Start Date : March 1, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 30, 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : June 30, 2023


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Receive an adult-onset result
Compare change in psychosocial outcomes and health behaviors of those with a pathogenic variant in a gene associated with adult onset of disease.
Genetic: Receive an adult-onset result
Assess the psychosocial outcomes and the lived experience of MyCode pediatric participants and parents who have received an adult-onset genomic result.

Experimental: Receive a pediatric-onset result
Compare change in psychosocial outcomes and health behaviors of those with a pathogenic variant in a gene associated with pediatric onset of disease or with risk reduction interventions that begin in childhood.
Genetic: Receive a pediatric-onset result
Assess the psychosocial outcomes and the lived experience of MyCode pediatric participants and parents who have received an adult-onset genomic result.

Active Comparator: Control - No result
Compare change in psychosocial outcomes and health behaviors of those without a genomic result.
Genetic: Control - No Result
Assess the psychosocial outcomes and the lived experience of MyCode pediatric participants and parents who have not received an adult-onset genomic result.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1, 6, & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Change in general anxiety and depression measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale.

  2. General Functioning subscale of McMaster Family Assessment Device [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1, 6, & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Change in family functioning measured using the General Functioning subscale of McMaster Family Assessment Device.

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1, 6, & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Change in health-related quality of life measured using the HRQOL.

  4. Uptake of cascade testing [ Time Frame: 12 months post-disclosure to pediatric proband ]
    Uptake of cascade testing (yes/no) among parents.

  5. Initiation of risk reduction behavior [ Time Frame: 12 months post-disclosure to pediatric proband ]
    Initiation of risk reduction behavior (yes/no) among parents with familial gene variant.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Body Image instrument [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1, 6, & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Change in adolescents' body image measured using the Body image instrument.

  2. Self-Esteem scale [ Time Frame: Baseline, 1, 6, & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Change in adolescents' self-esteem measured using the Self-Esteem scale.

  3. Decision Regret scale [ Time Frame: 1 & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Assessment of regret to participate in MyCode & receive genomic result measured using the Decision regret scale.

  4. Genetic Counseling Satisfaction scale [ Time Frame: 1 month post-disclosure ]
    Satisfaction with genetic counseling measured using the Genetic counselor satisfaction scale.

  5. Children's Revised Impact of Events scale [ Time Frame: 1, 6, &12 months post-disclosure ]
    Assessment of condition-specific distress among individuals with adult or pediatric-onset genomic result measured using the Children's revised impact of events scale.

  6. Psychological Adaptation to Genetic Information scale [ Time Frame: 1, 6, & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Assessment of psychological adjustment among individuals w/adult or pediatric-onset genomic result measured using the Psychological adaptation to genetic information scale.

  7. Health Education Impact questionnaire [ Time Frame: 1, 6, & 12 months post-disclosure ]
    Assessment of patient education & empowerment among individuals with adult or pediatric-onset genomic result measured using the Health education impact questionnaire.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   Child, Adult, Older Adult
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

Any pediatric MyCode participant between the ages of 0 and 17 and at least one of their parents.

Exclusion Criteria:

Individuals who have already had genetic counseling for any of the actionable target conditions as part of their routine clinical care or participation in other research.


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03832985


Contacts
Contact: Loren Butry, MS 570-714-6634 lmbutry@geisinger.edu

Sponsors and Collaborators
Geisinger Clinic
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Adam H Buchanan, MS, LGC Geisinger - Genomic Medicine Institute

Publications:
Moos R, Moos B. Family Environment Scale Manual: Development, Applications, Research. 3rd ed. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologist Press; 1994
Rosenberg M. Society and the adolescent self-image. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press; 1965
Giannopoulou I, Smith P, Ecker C, Strouthos M, Dikaiakou A, Yule W. Factor structure Children's Revised Impact of Events (CRIES) Scale with children exposed to earthquake Pers Individ Diff. 2006;40(5):1027-1037
CDC. Office of Public Health Genomics - Genomic Tests and Family History by Levels of Evidence.2014; http://www.cdc.gov/genomics/gtesting/tier.htm.

Responsible Party: Adam Buchanan, Assistant Professor, Geisinger Clinic
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03832985     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 2018-0419
1R01HG009671-01A1 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: February 6, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 6, 2019
Last Verified: February 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Adam Buchanan, Geisinger Clinic:
adult-onset
pediatric
genomic
genetic

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Syndrome
Hypercholesterolemia
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis
Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome
Disease
Pathologic Processes
Hyperlipidemias
Dyslipidemias
Lipid Metabolism Disorders
Metabolic Diseases
Lipid Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Metabolism, Inborn Errors
Genetic Diseases, Inborn
Hyperlipoproteinemias
Colorectal Neoplasms
Intestinal Neoplasms
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
Digestive System Neoplasms
Neoplasms by Site
Neoplasms
Neoplastic Syndromes, Hereditary
Digestive System Diseases
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Colonic Diseases
Intestinal Diseases
DNA Repair-Deficiency Disorders
Breast Neoplasms
Ovarian Neoplasms
Endocrine Gland Neoplasms