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Improvement of Facial Recognition Ability and Multitasking

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03832101
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : February 6, 2019
Last Update Posted : February 6, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Christopher L. Asplund, National University, Singapore

Brief Summary:
This study aims to determine the efficacy of training on facial recognition and multitasking. The researchers hypothesize that participants who have undergone facial recognition and multitasking training will demonstrate an improved facial recognition ability and performance in multi-tasking. The researchers also hypothesize that measures of sustained and selective attention will predict performance on multitasking tasks. This work sets the ground work for future research into if and how facial recognition and multitasking ability can be improved.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Facial Discrimination Multitasking Behavioral: MATB Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

There has been evidence showing improvements on performance on various cognitive tasks after training, but evidence on multitasking and facial recognition is lacking. Both multi-tasking and facial recognition are crucial for military and law enforcement personnel, and the respective organizations can consider these abilities during their respective recruitment and training processes.

This study will test whether training on multi-tasking and facial recognition tasks can improve an individual's performance. Additionally, it will test whether their performance on other measures of attention and multitasking can predict changes post-training.

Participants will go through 5 testing sessions span over 5 days. For each session, participants will complete a multitasking task and a facial recognition task. Participants are hypothesized to improve in their performance after 5 consecutive days of training on these 2 tasks. Additionally, participants will also complete 2 attention tasks, 1 face memory task, and 1 other multi-tasking task only on the first day. Both multitasking tasks are expected to correlate at baseline, and performance on the attention tasks may predict performance on multitasking tasks as these tasks require sustained and selective attention. A face memory task will also be used to account for each individual's baseline facial recognition ability.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 100 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Masking: Single (Participant)
Primary Purpose: Basic Science
Official Title: Improvement of Facial Recognition Ability and Multitasking
Actual Study Start Date : February 13, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2020

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Difficult face discrimination
All participants will complete 5 training and testing sessions in total, once a day, over the course of a week (weekdays). On the first day, participants will go through an initial test (Cambridge Face Memory Test; approximately 15 minutes) to determine their baseline facial recognition ability. Thereafter, participants in the Difficult group will undergo training involving discriminations between highly similar faces. Each participant's involvement in the study will last only 5 consecutive days. The total participation time is 7.5 hours per participant.
Behavioral: MATB
MATB has two multitasking tasks and two attention tasks. The two multitasking tasks evaluates performance on multiple cognitively demanding assignments in both the auditory and visual domains. The two attention tasks measures performance in sustained and selective attention

Experimental: Easy face discrimination
All participants will complete 5 training and testing sessions in total, once a day, over the course of a week (weekdays). On the first day, participants will go through an initial test (Cambridge Face Memory Test; approximately 15 minutes) to determine their baseline facial recognition ability. Those in the Easy group will discriminate between dissimilar faces. Each participant's involvement in the study will last only 5 consecutive days. The total participation time is 7.5 hours per participant.
Behavioral: MATB
MATB has two multitasking tasks and two attention tasks. The two multitasking tasks evaluates performance on multiple cognitively demanding assignments in both the auditory and visual domains. The two attention tasks measures performance in sustained and selective attention

Active Comparator: Control
All participants will complete 5 training and testing sessions in total, once a day, over the course of a week (weekdays). On the first day, participants will go through an initial test (Cambridge Face Memory Test; approximately 15 minutes) to determine their baseline facial recognition ability. Those in the Control group will perform a simple face-matching exercise. This training will last for approximately 30 minutes. Each participant's involvement in the study will last only 5 consecutive days. The total participation time is 7.5 hours per participant.
Behavioral: MATB
MATB has two multitasking tasks and two attention tasks. The two multitasking tasks evaluates performance on multiple cognitively demanding assignments in both the auditory and visual domains. The two attention tasks measures performance in sustained and selective attention




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Facial recognition performance change during training [ Time Frame: Day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]
    The crucial measure is percent correct recognition of target faces learned on the first day. These faces are either presented in isolation (Is this a target face? Yes/No) or with other faces (Which is the target?). Performance is measured on each day of training to establish learning trajectories.

  2. Multi-tasking performance change during training [ Time Frame: Day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]
    The crucial measures are speed and accuracy on each component task of the MATB (Multi-Attribute Task Battery; Comstock & Arnegard, 1992). Performance is measured on each day of training to establish learning trajectories.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   21 Years to 40 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Participants must be over 21 if they are not from NUS or Yale-NUS. NUS or Yale-NUS students over 18 can also participate. All participants are expected to be fluent in English.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Participants with a history of perceptual or memory deficit will be excluded.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03832101


Contacts
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Contact: Christopher L Asplund, Ph.D. +65660 3327 chris.asplund@yale-nus.edu.sg

Locations
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Singapore
National University of Singapore Recruiting
Singapore, Singapore
Contact: Christopher L Asplund, Ph.D.    +6566013327    chris.asplund@yale-nus.edu.sg   
Sponsors and Collaborators
National University, Singapore

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Responsible Party: Christopher L. Asplund, Assistant Professor, National University, Singapore
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03832101     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: S-17-180
First Posted: February 6, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 6, 2019
Last Verified: February 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Facies
Disease Attributes
Pathologic Processes