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iKanEat: A Randomized-controlled, Multi-center Trial of Megestrol for Chronic Oral Food Refusal in Children (iKanEat)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03815019
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : January 24, 2019
Last Update Posted : August 21, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Ann Davis, PhD, MPH, ABPP, University of Kansas Medical Center

Brief Summary:
This is a multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. The primary focus of the study is the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment with megestrol as part of a 24 week behavioral feeding protocol in transitioning from tube to oral feedings in a pediatric population. Approximately 60 pediatric subjects matching the criteria for eligibility will be enrolled in the study and randomized to receive either megestrol (n=30) or placebo (n=30).

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Feeding Behavior Feeding Disorder of Infancy or Early Childhood Drug: Megestrol Acetate Behavioral: iKanEat Behavioral Intervention Phase 4

Detailed Description:

The primary aim of the current study is to conduct a randomized controlled trial of a 4-week course of megestrol, the only remaining medication that is part of the iKanEat protocol, to ensure that the addition of megestrol results in improved child outcomes. The second aim is to assess the safety of megestrol as part of the iKanEat protocol. Our previous work (as well as work by others) suggests that a 6 week course of megestrol can lead to adrenal insufficiency in some children, so as part of the current protocol, the investigators will assess the safety of a 4 week course of this drug.

Finally, parents of tube fed children encounter multiple psychosocial stressors regarding tube feeding. These include concerns about their child's survival due to their underlying medical issues, feelings of "failure" due to their inability to feed their child orally, increased feelings of stress around the tube feeding and decreased support from others due to the tube feeding. Our research indicates that quality of life can be poor in tube fed children, even more so than children with cancer or burns. Given the significance of these issues, the third aim of the study is to examine the effect of the transition from tube to oral feeding on parent stress and parent and child quality of life.

Aim 1: To assess the efficacy of megestrol as part of the 24 week iKanEat protocol.

Hypothesis 1: Children randomized to the megestrol group will be significantly more successful in making the transition to oral feeding (defined as obtaining at least 90% of calories orally) than children randomized to the placebo group.

Aim 2: To assess the safety of 4 weeks of megestrol as part of the 24 week iKanEat protocol.

Hypothesis 2A: Children randomized to the megestrol group will not differ from control children in morning cortisol classification level (low, average, high) and will remain within the normal range at all time points. Analyses 2B: Exploratory analysis will determine which, if any, covariates (gender, age, and diagnoses at week 0, diagnoses at birth) are related to abnormal morning cortisol levels.

Aim 3: To examine the effect of the transition from tube to oral feeding on parent stress and parent and child quality of life. Hypothesis 3A: The transition to oral feeding will temporarily increase parent stress at week 14 at the cessation of tube feeding, with a return to baseline by week 24. Hypothesis 3B: The transition to oral feeding will increase parent/child quality of life at 24 weeks compared to week 0. Children with feeding tubes have few options for treatment other than extensive inpatient stays and expensive day treatment programs. iKanEat offers an outpatient, less intensive, empirically supported effective treatment option that can improve the lives of children and families. It is imperative that the investigators determine the efficacy and safety of the protocol including 4 weeks of megestrol before the investigators move toward broad dissemination of the iKanEat protocol.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 60 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: This is a multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. The primary focus of the study is the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment with megestrol as part of a 24 week behavioral feeding protocol in transitioning from tube to oral feedings in a pediatric population. Approximately 60 pediatric subjects matching the criteria for eligibility will be enrolled in the study and randomized to receive either megestrol (n=30) or placebo (n=30).
Masking: Triple (Participant, Care Provider, Investigator)
Masking Description: The drug will be dispensed by the investigational pharmacy at each site, who will be the only unblinded part of the team. They will receive the random codes prepared by the study statistician, and will dispense placebo/megestrol as appropriate.
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: iKanEat: A Randomized-controlled, Multi-center Trial of Megestrol for Chronic Oral Food Refusal in Children 9 Months to 5 Years 6 Months of Age
Actual Study Start Date : August 15, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : January 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : June 2023

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Megestrol

Megestrol is a steroid and progestational drug FDA approved for treating anorexia or weight loss in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Its use in the current protocol is "off label" to stimulate appetite in tube-fed infants and toddlers who are weaning from tube feedings and learning to eat. The precise mechanism of action that leads to increased appetite and weight gain is unknown, but is probably related to megestrol's glucocorticoid effect.

The proposed study will use megestrol 6 mg/kg/day in two doses because this dose has been effective and safe in two previous studies using megestrol to stimulate appetite in children transitioning from tube to oral feedings. The megestrol will be dosed at full dose weeks 10-11, at 66% dose week 12, at 33% dose week 14, and fully tapered at the end of week 14. Megestrol is absorbed from the small bowel, so feeding it through the tube will be acceptable.

Drug: Megestrol Acetate
The proposed study will use megestrol 6 mg/kg/day in two doses because this dose has been effective and safe in two previous studies using megestrol to stimulate appetite in children transitioning from tube to oral feedings. The megestrol will be dosed at full dose weeks 10-11, at 66% dose week 12, at 33% dose week 14, and fully tapered at the end of week 14. Megestrol is absorbed from the small bowel, so feeding it through the tube will be acceptable.
Other Names:
  • Megace
  • Megestrol

Behavioral: iKanEat Behavioral Intervention

The 24 week iKanEat intervention is composed of 4 clinic visits and a series of 12 tele-visits. All visits (clinic and tele-visits) will focus directly on the oral-motor and behavioral skills necessary for oral eating.

Tele-visits will begin by building rapport and asking for a summary of all relevant information since the last point of contact, including parent perception of changes in weight, feeding habits, progress, stress of parent/child, and illness. The majority of the time left in the 30 minute session will be spent dealing with parent concerns, which our previous project indicates may include questions about measures, questions about implementation of the iKanEat protocol, and ensuring that children/families adhere to the oral-motor and behavioral guidelines for feeding.


Placebo Comparator: Placebo
Subjects randomized to the placebo protocol will receive a placebo syrup identical in taste and smell to megestrol at the same intervals as those in the megestrol group but the syrup will contain no active ingredients.
Behavioral: iKanEat Behavioral Intervention

The 24 week iKanEat intervention is composed of 4 clinic visits and a series of 12 tele-visits. All visits (clinic and tele-visits) will focus directly on the oral-motor and behavioral skills necessary for oral eating.

Tele-visits will begin by building rapport and asking for a summary of all relevant information since the last point of contact, including parent perception of changes in weight, feeding habits, progress, stress of parent/child, and illness. The majority of the time left in the 30 minute session will be spent dealing with parent concerns, which our previous project indicates may include questions about measures, questions about implementation of the iKanEat protocol, and ensuring that children/families adhere to the oral-motor and behavioral guidelines for feeding.





Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in % kilocalories/day obtained orally [ Time Frame: Weeks 0 to 24 ]
    What percentage of kilocalories come from oral feedings as opposed to g-tube feeding.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Number of patients with adrenal insufficiency as measured by morning cortisol lab value [ Time Frame: 10 to 14 weeks ]
    The investigators will determine whether any of our participants in either group have adrenal sufficiency levels outside of the normal range at any time point. Should any participant have levels outside of the normal range, the investigators will descriptively examine the individual characteristics associated with this, including group assignment, medical diagnoses, sex, and age at initiation. These characteristics will be reported descriptively.

  2. Change in parent stress as measured by the Pediatric Inventory for Parents (PIP36) [ Time Frame: Weeks 0 to 24 ]
    The investigators will model parent stress levels from Week 0 to Week 24 of the intervention. The PIP is scored separately for each of the 4 domains (Communication, Emotional Distress, Medical Care, Role Function), across 2 scales: Frequency (F) and Difficulty (D). There is also a total score comprised of the sum for each of the 4 domains, yielding Total F and Total D scores. Items are scored as endorsed by respondents, ranging from 1-5. The range for each of the Total F and Total D scores is 42-210. Higher scores are indicative of worse parent stress outcomes.

  3. Change in child quality of life as measured by the Infant Toddler Quality of Life scale (ITQOL47) [ Time Frame: Week 0 to 24 ]
    The investigators will model child quality of life from Week 0 to Week 24 of the intervention. The Infant Toddler Quality of Life Questionnaire™ (ITQOL) was developed for use in infants and toddlers from 2-months-to-5 years of age. The Infant Toddler Quality of Life Questionnaire™ (ITQOL) adopts the World Health Organization's definition of health, as a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease. For each concept, item responses are scored, summed, and transformed on a scale from 0 (worst health) to 100 (best health).



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Ages Eligible for Study:   9 Months to 66 Months   (Child)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Males and females aged 9 months to 5y5m31d at the time of consent.
  2. Able to obtain parental or legal guardian written informed consent from subjects as applicable by local laws and regulations.
  3. Subjects must have a G or G/J tube.
  4. Subjects must receive over 80% of their total daily calorie needs from a tube in order to be classified as tube dependent.
  5. Subjects must have a ≥ 3 month history of feeding problems as identified by a diagnosis from a multidisciplinary feeding team, and must have permission from the physician on the team to ensure that they are medically stable enough to participate in a weaning study.
  6. Subjects must possess the oral motor skills necessary for eating. Subjects must possess behavioral skills necessary for mealtimes.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Children receiving oral or inhaled steroids.
  2. Parent has a known developmental delay or cognitive impairment that may make participation in the study difficult (children with these issues will not be excluded).
  3. Children receiving intensive (defined as more than one session per month) behavioral feeding therapy with a licensed psychologist (previous behavioral feeding therapy is not an exclusion criterion; neither is current oral-motor, sensory, or speech therapy).
  4. Children of non-English speaking parents.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03815019


Contacts
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Contact: Ann M Davis, PhD, MPH, ABPP` 913-588-6323 adavis6@kumc.edu
Contact: Kelsey M Dean, RD, CCRP 913-588-3775 kdean@kumc.edu

Locations
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United States, California
Rady Children's Hospital - San Diego Recruiting
San Diego, California, United States, 92123
Contact: Hayat Mousa, MD    858-966-8907    hmousa@ucsd.edu   
United States, Florida
Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children Recruiting
Orlando, Florida, United States, 32806
Contact: Devendra Mehta, MD    321-841-3338    devendra.mehta@orlandohealth.com   
United States, Louisiana
Children's Hospital Not yet recruiting
New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, 70118
Contact: Paul Hyman, MD    504-899-9511    phyman@lsuhsc.edu   
United States, Massachusetts
Boston Children's Hospital Recruiting
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02115
Contact: Rachel Rosen, MD    617-355-6055    Rachel.Rosen@childrens.harvard.edu   
United States, Missouri
Children's Mercy Hospital Recruiting
Kansas City, Missouri, United States, 64108
Contact: Sarah Edwards, DO    816-234-3000    sedwards1@cmh.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Kansas Medical Center

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Responsible Party: Ann Davis, PhD, MPH, ABPP, Professor, University of Kansas Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03815019     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: STUDY00142352
First Posted: January 24, 2019    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: August 21, 2019
Last Verified: August 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Ann Davis, PhD, MPH, ABPP, University of Kansas Medical Center:
Gastrostomy Tube
G-Tube
Oral Food Refusal
Behavioral Intervention
Megestrol
Transition to Oral Feedings
Weaning
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Feeding and Eating Disorders
Mental Disorders
Megestrol
Megestrol Acetate
Contraceptives, Oral, Synthetic
Contraceptives, Oral
Contraceptive Agents, Female
Contraceptive Agents
Reproductive Control Agents
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal
Antineoplastic Agents
Appetite Stimulants
Central Nervous System Stimulants