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Effect of Chronic Rhinosinusitis on Voice of Children

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03696693
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : October 5, 2018
Last Update Posted : October 5, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Sahar Sabri Abdelraheem, Assiut University

Brief Summary:
Evaluation of the effect of chronic rhinosinusitis on the laryngeal mucosa and voice quality in children. This is important to know factors affecting voice disorders

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
Voice Disorders in Children Device: acoustic vocal analysis

Detailed Description:

The voice is that the carrier wave of verbal communication. It's created within the voice box l by vibrations of the mucous membrane of the vocal folds leading to the assembly of the first laryngeal sound. It depends on the larynx that's the voice generator, the oral fissure beside the tongue and teeth that articulate the voice, and therefore the nose with the paranasal sinuses that participate in the resonance.

Any disruption of the performance of voice is termed dysphonia. Dysphonia is outlined as perceptual audible deviation of a patient's habitual voice as self-judged or judged by his or her listeners .

"Hoarseness" or "dysphonia" are terms usually used to describe a change within the quality of the voice in which the voice are often raspy, breathy, strained, fatigued, rough, tremulous, or asthenic. There is also a change in pitch, loudness or voice breaks. The prevalence of hoarseness in children ranges from 6 to 23 percent . Boys were statistically more probably to have dysphonia (7.5%) over girls (4.6%) . the etiology of childhood dysphonia is multifactorial and factors that in previous studies have been connected to dysphonia are health- related factors , personality triats, and environmental factors . Health related factors such as recurrent inflammation of respiratory airway, Allergy and chronic cough. Personality triats such as hyperactivity and impulsiveness, besides previous history of excessive crying, Environmental factors such as pollution by noise, dryness, cold air or dust and fumes.the most common laryngeal diagnosis for children with hoarseness in a treatment - seeking population was vocal fold nodules, followed by vocal cysts, and acute laryngitis. They attribute this to vocal overuse or misuse.

Chronic rhinosinusitis is a frequently noticable condition in otorhinolaryngology clinic. 5 % to 13% of childhood viral upper airway infections may lead to acute rhinosinusitis, with a proportion of these to progress to a chronic rhinosinusitis. Chronic rhinosinusitis is defined as a minimum of ninty continuous days of two or additional symptoms of infected rhinorrhea, nasal blockage, headache, or cough and either endoscopic signs of nasal mucosal swelling and oedema, mucopurulent nasal discharge, or nasal polyposis may be associated with CT scan findings showing mucosal changes within the ostiomeatal complex and/or sinuses in a pediatric patient. The post nasal discharge is usually thick mucopurulent that goes onto the oropharyngeal and the laryngeal tissue resulting in frequent throat clearing, and cough which cause mechanical trauma and hoarse voice quality. Previous studies revealed that the voice in individuals presented with chronic sinusitis had lower values in fundamental frequency compared with those that have not sinusitis.

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Study Type : Observational
Estimated Enrollment : 100 participants
Observational Model: Case-Control
Time Perspective: Retrospective
Official Title: Impact of Chronic Rhinosinusitis on the Laryngeal Mucosa and Voice Quality in Children Aged From 6- to 18- Years Old
Estimated Study Start Date : October 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : October 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Voice Disorders

Group/Cohort Intervention/treatment
children with chronic rhinosinusitis
Children aged 6-18 years presented with symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis will be recruited from the otorhinolaryngology out-patient clinic and department at Assiut University Hospital from October, 2018 to October, 2019.
Device: acoustic vocal analysis
Computerized Speech Laboratory (model 4300; Kay Elemetrics Corporation)
Other Name: Video rhino- laryngoscope (3.7 mm; 8403 ZXK)

children without chronic rhinosinusitis
Children have the same age and number in the study group which are presented with vocal symptoms and have not chronic rhinosinusitis will be recruited for the same duration.
Device: acoustic vocal analysis
Computerized Speech Laboratory (model 4300; Kay Elemetrics Corporation)
Other Name: Video rhino- laryngoscope (3.7 mm; 8403 ZXK)




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. impact of chronic rhinosinusitis on the laryngeal mucosa and voice quality in children [ Time Frame: 20 mimutes ]
    to evaluate effect of rhinosinusitis on acoustic voice parameters by using acoustic voice analysis (model 4300; Kay Elemetrics Corporation) and assessment changes in the laryngeal mucosa using either video rhino- laryngoscope (3.7 mm; 8403 ZXK) orRigid laryngoscope (70 degrees, 8700 CKA).



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Ages Eligible for Study:   6 Years to 18 Years   (Child, Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Children aged 6-18 years presented with symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis will be recruited from the otorhinolaryngology out-patient clinic and department at Assiut University Hospital from October, 2018 to October, 2019.comparing them with children with no symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis and complaining of vocal symptoms.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Age: from 6 to 18 years.
  • gender: both sexes will be included.
  • patients with chronic rhinosinusitis according to (European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps 2012).

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Age below 6 or above 18 years.
  • Children receiving treatment for rhinosinusitis.
  • Previous surgical intervention (laryngeal microsurgery or tracheal intubation).
  • Congenital anomalies.
  • Mental retardation.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03696693


Contacts
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Contact: Eman Sayed Hassan, professor 01004082014 ext +20 eshh2003@aun.edu.eg

Sponsors and Collaborators
Assiut University
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Sahar Sabri Abd-El Raheem, PhD Assiut University

Publications of Results:
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Responsible Party: Sahar Sabri Abdelraheem, principal investigator, Assiut University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03696693    
Other Study ID Numbers: rhinosinusitis in children
First Posted: October 5, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: October 5, 2018
Last Verified: September 2018

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Voice Disorders
Laryngeal Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Diseases
Signs and Symptoms