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Using Bluetooth Beacon Technology to Reduce Distracted Pedestrian Behavior

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03604497
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : July 27, 2018
Last Update Posted : January 7, 2020
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
David Schwebel, University of Alabama at Birmingham

Brief Summary:

Over 4,800 American pedestrians die annually, a figure that is current increasing. One hypothesized reason for the increasing trend in pedestrian injuries and deaths is the role of mobile technology in distracting both pedestrians and drivers. The investigators propose to develop and then evaluate Bluetooth beacon technology as a means to alert and warn pedestrians when they are approaching dangerous intersections, reminding them to attend to the traffic environment and cross the street safely rather than engaging with mobile technology. One aspect of the research will involve a crossover research trial to evaluate efficacy of the program.

Bluetooth beacons are very small (about the size of a dime) and inexpensive (~$20 range) devices that broadcast information unidirectionally (beacon to smartphone) within a closed proximal network. The investigators propose placing beacons at intersection corners (e.g., on signposts) frequently trafficked by urban college students. The beacons will transmit to an app installed on users' smartphones, signaling users to attend to their environment and cross the street safely. The app will be developed to be flexible based on user preferences; for research purposes, the app also will download data concerning the users' behavior while crossing the street. The crossover trial will evaluate the app with a sample of about 411 young adults whose behavior is monitored for: (a) 3 weeks without the app being activated, (b) 3 weeks with the app activated, and then (c) 6 weeks without the app activated to assess retention of behavior. Throughout the 12 week period, the investigators will monitor user behavior at multiple intersections around campus, along with gathering self-report questionnaire perceptions and behavior at baseline and 12-week post-intervention assessments.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Health Behavior Behavioral: beacon alerts Behavioral: no alerts retention Phase 1 Phase 2

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 416 participants
Allocation: Non-Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Prevention
Official Title: Using Bluetooth Beacon Technology to Reduce Distracted Pedestrian Behavior
Actual Study Start Date : August 15, 2019
Actual Primary Completion Date : December 21, 2019
Actual Study Completion Date : December 21, 2019

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: beacon alerts
active intervention - participants are receiving alerts to warn them about distracted pedestrian behavior near intersections
Behavioral: beacon alerts
alerts via unidirectional communication from beacons to smartphones when smartphones are approaching pedestrian crossing at activated intersection

No Intervention: no alerts baseline
baseline - participants do not receive any alerts on their mobile smartphone when near intersections
no alerts retention
retention phase - alerts have stopped after active intervention and behavior is monitored to test retention of learned behavior
Behavioral: no alerts retention
no alerts will appear, but we will measure retention of behavior learned during the active intervention stage




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. distraction [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    percentage of time participants is distracted while crossing streets in intersections involved in the study, as measured electronically by smartphone behavior near those intersections



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 25 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • individuals who cross streets on the UAB campus at least twice daily
  • ownership of an Android phone
  • willingness to install the app on phone
  • ability to communicate in English

Exclusion Criteria:

  • none

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03604497


Locations
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United States, Alabama
UAB Youth Safety Lab, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Birmingham, Alabama, United States, 35294
Sponsors and Collaborators
University of Alabama at Birmingham
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)

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Responsible Party: David Schwebel, Primary Investigator, University of Alabama at Birmingham
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03604497    
Other Study ID Numbers: R21HD095270 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
R21HD095270 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: July 27, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: January 7, 2020
Last Verified: January 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided
Plan Description: Will communicate with qualified investigators to share anonymous data if research goals are justified

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No