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Trial record 7 of 38 for:    Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies | Chlamydia

Azithromycin Compared With Doxycycline for Treating Anorectal Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection Concomitant to a Vaginal Infection (CHLAZIDOXY)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03532464
Recruitment Status : Not yet recruiting
First Posted : May 22, 2018
Last Update Posted : June 4, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
USC EA 3671 Infections humaines à mycoplasmes et à chlamydiae
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
University Hospital, Bordeaux

Brief Summary:

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI), especially among young women. Up to 75% of C. trachomatis infected women are asymptomatic. If untreated, C. trachomatis infection can cause sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy and tubal factor infertility. C. trachomatis can also cause anorectal infections, which are typically asymptomatic. Among women with urogenital chlamydial infection, around 36-91% also had concurrent anorectal chlamydial. Notably, there was no association with anal intercourse in the studies that reported it. However, guidelines do not recommend routine anorectal testing, but restricted testing in people who are in high-risk groups, report anal sexual behavior, or have anal symptoms, i.e., on selective indications. This is in contrast to urogenital testing, which is a routine procedure in STI care services.

The anal transmission of C. trachomatis in women may occur by autoinoculation from the vagina due to the close proximity of the vagina and the anus. C. trachomatis could lead to a persistent infection in the lower gastrointestinal tract, suggesting the potential role of autoinoculation of cervical chlamydial infection from the rectal site. Such (repeat) urogenital infections could lead to reproductive tract morbidity. Recommended treatments for C. trachomatis infections are a single 1g dose of azithromycin or 100mg of doxycycline 2 times a day for 7 days. Although these two regimens are equivalent for urogenital infection, no study has compared the effectiveness of these two treatments on anorectal infection. If rectal C. trachomatis is a hidden reservoir influencing transmission rates, and considering the potential complications of cervical infections, providing further evidence of the need for effective rectal treatments among women is highly relevant.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection Vaginal Infection Anal Infection Drug: azithromycin Drug: doxycycline Phase 4

Detailed Description:

A possible reason for C. trachomatis detection after treatment may be transmission (self or another) or treatment failure. Whether antimicrobial treatment failure for C. trachomatis plays a role remains poorly understood. There is no evidence of antimicrobial resistance and testing for antimicrobial resistance for C. trachomatis is not routinely available. The hypothesis of transmission is most likely, especially as recontamination is very common among young people, either due to an untreated partner or a new partner. When these two conditions are ruled out, the hypothesis of autoinoculation from rectum to vagina is quite probable.

With regard to anorectal C. trachomatis infections, some studies concluded that azithromycin is a suboptimal treatment], while another study found doxycycline and azithromycin treatment to be equally effective. However, there are no robust studies that shows conclusive evidence relating to a suboptimal effect of any time of treatment or that prefers one treatment over the other.

The current study attempts to clarify the above question. The team propose to conduct the first open-label randomized controlled trial comparing the efficacy (measured as microbial cure) of a single 1g dose of azithromycin versus 100 mg of doxycycline twice daily for seven days for the treatment of anorectal C. trachomatis infection concurrent to urogenital infection in women. The experimental group will include women with C. trachomatis-positive vaginal and anorectal swabs treated with doxycycline twice daily for seven days with one tablet of 100 mg of doxycycline in the morning and evening. The control group will include women with C. trachomatis-positive vaginal and anorectal swabs treated with azithromycin consisting of four tablets of 250 mg of azithromycin in one intake.

The team made the hypothesis that the efficacy of azithromycin for anorectal infections may be lower than that of doxycycline, resulting in reinfections by autoinoculation from rectum to vagina. The expected result is that the number of women with a C. trachomatis-positive NAAT result in the anorectal swab will be significantly higher in the control group than in the experimental group after treatment.


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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 460 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Randomized, open-label, multicenter
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Randomized, Open-label, Multicenter Study of Azithromycin Compared With Doxycycline for Treating Anorectal Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection Concomitant to a Vaginal Infection
Estimated Study Start Date : July 1, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : December 1, 2019
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 1, 2019


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: Patient treated by doxycycline

The patients in the doxycycline group take one tablet of 100 mg twice a day for seven days.

Antibiotics will be dispensed in their usual packaging with a clinical trial label.

Drug: doxycycline
The patients in the doxycycline group take one tablet of 100 mg twice a day for seven days.
Other Name: Treatment

Active Comparator: Patients treated by azithromycin

The patients in the azithromycin group take 4 tablets of 250 mg in the morning as a single dose.

Antibiotics will be dispensed in their usual packaging with a clinical trial label.

Drug: azithromycin
The route of administration is oral. It is administered at a dose of 1 g (4 tablets), as a single dose with or without food.
Other Name: Treatment




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Nucleic Acid Amplification Assay result [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    C. trachomatis-positive NAAT result in anorectal specimens after treatment


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. the number of women with an anorectal C. trachomatis infection concomitant to a vaginal infection [ Time Frame: Day 1 ]
    The prevalence of anorectal C. trachomatis infection concomitant to a vaginal infection is the number of women with an anorectal C. trachomatis infection divided by the total number of women included in the study

  2. C. trachomatis genotype [ Time Frame: Day 1 ]
    The number of subjects for whom the same C. trachomatis genotype profile will be identified in the vaginal-positive and anorectal-positive specimens obtained on the day of inclusion (self-infection), and in the anorectal-positive specimen obtained six weeks after treatment initiation (persistence) and in the vaginal-positive specimen obtained four months after treatment (autoinoculation).

  3. C. trachomatis genotype [ Time Frame: 6 weeks ]
    The number of subjects for whom the same C. trachomatis genotype profile will be identified in the vaginal-positive and anorectal-positive specimens obtained on the day of inclusion (self-infection), and in the anorectal-positive specimen obtained six weeks after treatment initiation (persistence) and in the vaginal-positive specimen obtained four months after treatment (autoinoculation).

  4. C. trachomatis genotype [ Time Frame: 4 months ]
    The number of subjects for whom the same C. trachomatis genotype profile will be identified in the vaginal-positive and anorectal-positive specimens obtained on the day of inclusion (self-infection), and in the anorectal-positive specimen obtained six weeks after treatment initiation (persistence) and in the vaginal-positive specimen obtained four months after treatment (autoinoculation).



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Gender Based Eligibility:   Yes
Gender Eligibility Description:   A screening of vaginal C. trachomatis infection is performed among women consulting at a CeGIDD or at a termination pregnancy center before an abortion. C. trachomatis NAAT result will be available one week later, when the patient returns for consultation. In each participating center, a study site coordinator will screen all women with a C. trachomatis-positive vaginal swab and will verify eligibility criteria for inclusion in the study.
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Female
  • Age > 18 years
  • Negative β-hCG urinary assay and efficacious contraception for participant consulting in specialist centre
  • Participant requesting an abortion at a pregnancy termination centre and efficacious contraception after abortion
  • C. trachomatis-positive test for vaginal specimen using a Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAAT)
  • Sexually active
  • Consultation in one of the participating centers
  • Agree to be contacted for follow-up
  • Member or beneficiary of a social security system
  • Free written informed consent signed by the participant and the investigator (no later than the inclusion day and before performing any examination required for the study)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Women who have symptoms suggesting pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • Receipt of an antibiotic with antichlamydial activity within 21 days before screening or between screening and enrollment
  • Contraindications to tetracyclines, macrolides or ketolids (including allergy and treatment with colchicine, cisapride, ergot alkaloids and retinoids)
  • Inability to swallow pills
  • Refusal to participate in the study
  • Objectives of the study not understood.
  • Breast-feeding
  • Patients with serious cardiac diseases: documented prolongation of the QT tract of the ECG, cardiac arrhythmias, advanced heart failure (classification New York Heart Association or NYHA >III)
  • Patients treated with anticoagulants or drug with a definite potential of "Torsades de Pointe" or prolongation of the QT tract of the electrocardiogram
  • Patients with severe liver diseases

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03532464


Contacts
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Contact: Bertille de Barbeyrac, MD + 33 5 57 57 16 25 bertille.de-barbeyrac@u-bordeaux.fr
Contact: Olivia Peuchant, MD + 33 5 57 57 16 25 olivia.peuchant@u-bordeaux.fr

Locations
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France
CeGIDD - Marseille Not yet recruiting
Marseille, Marignane, France, 13700
Contact: Pervenche Martinet, MD    +33413317800    pervenche.martinet@departement13.fr   
CeGGID - Bordeaux Not yet recruiting
Bordeaux, France, 33000
Contact: Isabelle Le Hen, MD    +33557224660    i.lehen@gironde.fr   
CHU de Bordeaux Not yet recruiting
Bordeaux, France, 33000
Contact: Nathalie RAE, MD    +33556795888    nathalie.rae@chu-bordeaux.fr   
CHU de Nantes Not yet recruiting
Nantes, France, 44000
Contact: Claire Bernier, MD    +3320087009    claire.bernier@chu-nantes.fr   
Hôpital Hôtel Dieu Not yet recruiting
Paris, France, 75004
Contact: Thomas Girard, MD    +33142348724    thomas.girard@aphp.fr   
Hôpital de Roubaix Not yet recruiting
Roubaix, France, 59170
Contact: Philippe Lefebvre, MD, PhD    +33320993230    philippe.lefbvre@ch-roubaix.fr   
CHRU Tours Not yet recruiting
Tours, France, 37000
Contact: Nathalie Trignol-Viguier, MD    +33247474743    n.trignol@chu-tours.fr   
Sponsors and Collaborators
University Hospital, Bordeaux
USC EA 3671 Infections humaines à mycoplasmes et à chlamydiae
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Bertille de Barbeyrac, MD University Hospital, Bordeaux

Publications of Results:
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Responsible Party: University Hospital, Bordeaux
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03532464     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: CHUBX 2016/26
First Posted: May 22, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 4, 2018
Last Verified: May 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by University Hospital, Bordeaux:
Chlamydia Trachomatis
Infection
Vaginal
Anal

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Chlamydia Infections
Infection
Communicable Diseases
Chlamydiaceae Infections
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
Bacterial Infections
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Genital Diseases, Male
Genital Diseases, Female
Doxycycline
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Antimalarials
Antiprotozoal Agents
Antiparasitic Agents