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NASH Fitness Intervention in Thrombosis Trial (NASHFit)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03518294
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : May 8, 2018
Last Update Posted : February 20, 2019
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Jonathan Stine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

Brief Summary:
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in the United States. The most advanced forms of NAFLD are associated with increased liver-related mortality and lower overall survival. The current standard of care for NAFLD is lifestyle changes through diet and exercise. The human genome and regulation of gene expression is influenced by physical activity. NAFLD is a prothrombotic state with derangements in all three phases of hemostasis leading to clinically important clotting events. Exercise can improve coagulation in healthy persons. In this proposal, we seek to begin a line of work to answer the question "Can lifestyle changes effectively mitigate the increased risk of clotting in patients with NAFLD?" focusing initially on the at-risk population genetically susceptible to advanced disease.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Liver Diseases Blood Disorder Digestive System Disease Behavioral: Aerobic Exercise Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Often comorbid with obesity, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in the United States affecting 75-100 million adults, of which 15-20 million have the more severe variant nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Conservative estimates project a doubling in NASH by 2025.The most advanced forms of NAFLD are associated with increased liver-related mortality and lower overall survival. The most effective treatment for NAFLD remains adopting healthy dietary and exercise patterns, however NAFLD patients are among the least physically active individuals. Predicting exercise behavior on an individual level is highly complex due to differing motivation, physiologic response to and subjective experience of exercise as well as emerging genetic evidence. The human genome and regulation of gene expression is influenced by physical activity. Patatin like phospholipase-3 (PNPLA3) rs738409 polymorphism (GG, GC and CC genotypes) plays a crucial role in the development of NAFLD. The GG genotype is both associated with advanced NAFLD, and predicts response to physical activity. Patients with NASH have extensive extrahepatic disease and are hypercoagulable. NASH is a prothrombotic state with fibrinolytic dysfunction through elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), an independent risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Consequently, patients with NASH are predisposed to VTE; the risk of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) in NASH is 210% greater than in other liver disease. NASH patients are also at increased risk for pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT).The most advanced forms of NASH have the greatest thrombotic risk. While studies observe that change in diet, weight and physical activity patterns improve NASH, it is not clear whether these lifestyle changes also reduce the elevated clot risk, however, moderate-intensity exercise leads to improved fibrinolysis in healthy persons.The NASHFit study is being done to find out if exercise is beneficial in decreasing the risk of clotting problems in patients with NASH. Exercise has been shown to decrease markers of clotting in healthy individuals as well as in those with cardiovascular disease.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 42 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Standard of care Aerobic exercise
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: NASH Fitness Intervention in Thrombosis Trial (NASHFit)
Actual Study Start Date : June 1, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : June 1, 2021
Estimated Study Completion Date : December 1, 2021

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: Standard of Care
Subjects in the control condition will be instructed to continue their medical care at the discretion of their treating medical professional. They will be informed to maintain their current physical activity level. Weekly phone calls will be performed by study personnel to ensure adherence to the protocol (no changes in activity). Subjects will report to Penn State on a monthly basis for anthropometric assessment to confirm their self-reports and study investigators will perform and interim history and physical examination at that time.
Experimental: Aerobic Exercise
Subjects in the aerobic exercise group will be supervised to exercise 30 minutes, 5 times per week at a moderate intensity. Formal exercise instruction and supervision will be provided by ACSM certified fitness professionals at the Penn State University Fitness Center. Aerobic exercise can be completed on either the treadmill, exercise bike, rowing machine or the elliptical machine.
Behavioral: Aerobic Exercise
Subjects in the aerobic exercise group will be supervised to exercise 30 minutes, 5 times per week at a moderate intensity. Formal exercise instruction and supervision will be provided by ACSM certified fitness professionals at the Penn State University Fitness Center. Aerobic exercise can be completed on either the treadmill, exercise bike, rowing machine or the elliptical machine.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. PAI-1 level [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    The primary outcome of interest is change in fibrinolysis as measured by PAI-1 level immediately following completion of the exercise program.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in von williebrand factor (vWF) [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  2. change in p-selection [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  3. change in protein S [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  4. change in factor VIII [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  5. change in fibrinogen [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  6. change in antithrombin [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  7. change in protein C [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  8. change in adiponectin [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    fibrosis marker

  9. Patatin like phospholipase-3 (PNPLA3) rs738409 polymorphism [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    genotyping subjects (GG, GC and CC genotypes)

  10. Change in PAI-1 stratified by PNPLA3 genotype [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic marker

  11. change in % hepatic fat [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    measured by magnetic resonance imaging proton density fat fractionation (MRI-PDFF)

  12. correlation between VO2 max and hemostatic markers [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    hemostatic markers

  13. health related quality of life (HRQOL) change [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    quality of life

  14. change in hepatic fibrosis stage [ Time Frame: 5 months ]
    fibrosis



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 70 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria Adults age >=18 or <70 years Liver biopsy <= 6months prior to enrollment Biopsy proven NASH(79)

Lack of secondary causes of hepatic fat accumulation:

Significant alcohol consumption (<21 drinks/week for men and <14 drinks/week for women) Chronic hepatitis C Wilson disease Lipodystrophy Parenteral nutrition Long-term use of steatogenic medications (mipomersen, lomitapide, amiodarone, methotrexate, tamoxifen, corticosteroids) Monogenic hereditary disorders

Exclusion Criteria >90 minutes/week of at least moderate intensity exercise over the previous three months Pregnancy BMI <18 or >40 kg/m2(16) Uncontrolled diabetes (changes in medication dosing over the previous three months or hemoglobin A1c >9%)(12) Active cardiac symptoms Severe medical comorbidities/psychiatric illness Decompensated cirrhosis (history of esophageal varices, ascites or hepatic encephalopathy) Abdominal hernia Cancer with life expectancy <6 months MRI contraindications (severe claustrophobia, implanted ferrous metal) Other liver disease (positive hepatitis B surface antigen, antinuclear antibody titer >1:160) Active weight-loss program participation or weight-loss supplement use Active substance abuse/smoking Inability to provide informed consent Institutionalized/prisoner Inability to walk > 2 blocks or ¼ mile. Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q) score >=1 at the discretion of the study PI


Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03518294


Contacts
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Contact: Gloriany Rivas, BA 717-531-0003 ext 320223 grivas@pennstatehealth.psu.edu

Locations
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United States, Pennsylvania
Penn State Hershey Medical Center Recruiting
Hershey, Pennsylvania, United States, 17033
Contact: Gloriany Rivas, BA    717-531-0003 ext 320223    grivas@pennstatehealth.psu.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Jonathan Stine, MD Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

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Responsible Party: Jonathan Stine, Assistant Professor Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03518294     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 8507
First Posted: May 8, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 20, 2019
Last Verified: February 2019
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Jonathan Stine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center:
NAFLD
NASH
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Liver Diseases
Gastrointestinal Diseases
Thrombosis
Hematologic Diseases
Digestive System Diseases
Embolism and Thrombosis
Vascular Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases