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Walking and mHealth to Increase Participation in Parkinson Disease (WHIPPD)

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03517371
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : May 7, 2018
Last Update Posted : February 10, 2020
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Washington University School of Medicine
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Theresa D Ellis, Boston University Charles River Campus

Brief Summary:
Identifying effective ways to improve function, slow decline and reduce disability is a high priority for people living with Parkinson disease and other chronic conditions. Regular participation in walking is essential to reduce disability and enhance participation in preferred life activities. However, people with chronic conditions are often sedentary, contributing to greater disability. The goal of this work is to determine the benefits of a walking, walking enhancing exercises and cognitive-behavioral strategies delivered using mobile health technology for people with Parkinson disease over a sustained period of time.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Parkinson Disease Other: mHealth delivered exercise program Other: Exercise only Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

Parkinson disease (PD) is one of the most disabling chronic health conditions affecting older adults globally. While advances in medical and surgical management of PD have increased lifespans, these have not effectively altered the progressive decline in physical function and quality of life associated with PD. Identifying effective ways to improve function, slow decline and prevent or reduce disability remains of utmost importance in PD. Of particular concern in PD is gait decline, which is considered a red flag signaling emerging disability. Prior work has shown that people with PD experienced a 12% decline in amount of walking over one year - despite relative stability of motor impairments during that year. Treatment targeting walking, the most rapidly changing aspect of disability in PD, may have the greatest influence on slowing the impact of disease progression on physical function and reducing disability.

Traditionally, rehabilitation has targeted impairments and functional limitations with the expectation that gains would translate into greater participation in real-world activities. However, the evidence suggests that this does not occur. In this proposal, the investigators suggest a paradigm shift in which the primary target of the intervention is real-world walking behavior, as greater walking activity could preserve walking function and slow disability. The primary factors that limit engagement in walking in PD are psychological (e.g., low self-efficacy) rather than physical (e.g., motor impairments) in nature. As such, investigators will evaluate a cognitive-behavioral approach, grounded in social-cognitive theory and targeted at enhancing walking activity. This "connected behavioral approach" links physical therapists to persons with PD using a mobile health (mHealth) platform to deliver strategies to increase self-efficacy and provide goal-oriented, dynamic walking routines and walking enhancing exercises over one year. This approach will be compared to a control intervention which provides equivalent components and dosing of walking and a walking enhancing exercise program delivered by physical therapists but without a cognitive-behavioral mHealth approach. Investigators hypothesize that the mHealth group will demonstrate higher amounts of walking activity and greater walking capacity relative to the control group. With regard to mechanism underlying improvements in the mHealth group, it is hypothesized that self-efficacy will mediate changes in amount of walking and that changes in amount of walking will mediate changes in walking capacity over one year. The insights to be gained regarding mechanisms underlying changes noted will be critical to inform rehabilitation interventions designed to encourage sustained, long-term physical activity. If effective, our "connected behavioral approach" offers a unique, generalizable and scalable means to increase walking activity and improve walking capacity, thereby reducing disability in PD and perhaps in other chronic progressive conditions.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 148 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: This study will take place at Boston University (BU) and Washington University in St. Louis (WU). This is a two-arm, single-blinded, 1-year randomized controlled trial. Persons with mild to moderate PD are randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. In the mHealth arm, individuals participate in a cognitive-behavioral community-based walking program plus home-based walking enhancing progressive resistance exercises delivered using a mobile health platform. The active control condition receives the same components and dose of walking and exercise but without a cognitive-behavioral approach or the use of mobile health technology.
Masking: Single (Outcomes Assessor)
Masking Description: Blinded assessors will administer standardizes outcome measures across sites (BU & WU)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Walking and mHealth to Increase Participation in Parkinson Disease
Actual Study Start Date : February 4, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : May 31, 2023
Estimated Study Completion Date : May 31, 2023

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine


Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: mHealth delivered exercise program
Participants in the mHealth delivered exercise program have up to 10 in-person visits with a physical therapist over 12 months. The mHealth exercise program, consisting of walking, strengthening and stretching exercises, is prescribed and remotely adapted by a physical therapist over 1 year. Approximately 5-7 exercises are implemented 5 days per week. The exercise program is video-recorded and accessed on a smartphone or computer tablet via an application ("app"). Cognitive-behavioral elements are integrated emphasizing participant engagement in managing their health condition. Components of the mHealth program include goal setting, action planning, automated rewards, self-monitoring of progress and a remote connection to a physical therapist through a messaging feature.
Other: mHealth delivered exercise program
Participants in the mobile health condition have up to 10 in-person visits with a physical therapist over 12 months. The exercise program, consisting of walking, strengthening and stretching exercises, is prescribed through an "app" and remotely adapted by a physical therapist over 1 year. Approximately 5-7 exercises are implemented 5 days per week.

Active Comparator: Exercise only
Participants in the control group have up to 10 in-person visits with a physical therapist over 12-months - equivalent to the dose provided to the mHealth condition. Participants are instructed by the physical therapist to engage in walking and perform the same progressive resistance and stretching exercises (tailored to their needs and provided in written format) at the same frequency (5x/week) as participants in the mHealth condition. Participants in the control condition are instructed to gradually progress their exercise program and to increase the amount of walking over a 1-year period. No cognitive-behavioral approaches or mHealth technology will be provided.
Other: Exercise only
Participants in the control group have up to 10 in-person visits with the intervention physical therapist over 12-months. Participants are instructed by the physical therapist to engage in walking and perform progressive resistance and stretching exercises (tailored to their needs and provided in written format) 5 days per week.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Walking Activity [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Change in the number of steps walked per day

  2. Walking Intensity [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Moderate intensity minutes (number of minutes in which >100 steps were accumulated)


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Walking Capacity [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Change in six-minute walk distance



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Diagnosis of idiopathic, typical Parkinson disease according to the UK Brain Bank Criteria;
  2. Hoehn & Yahr stages 1-3 (mild to moderate disease severity);
  3. Stable on all PD medications for at least 2 weeks prior to study entry;
  4. Willing and able to provide informed consent.

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. < 18 years of age;
  2. Pregnant;
  3. diagnosis of atypical Parkinsonism;
  4. Hoehn & Yahr stages 4-5
  5. a score of > 2 on item 7 of the new freezing of gait questionnaire (moderately or significantly disturbing freezing episodes during daily walking);
  6. significant cognitive impairment;
  7. unstable medical or concomitant illnesses or psychiatric conditions, which in the opinion of the investigators would preclude successful participation;
  8. cardiac problems that interfere with ability to safely exercise
  9. orthopedic problems in the lower extremities or spine that may limit walking distance;
  10. unable to walk for 10 continuous minutes independently;
  11. live in an institution or medical facility (i.e. not in the community)

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03517371


Contacts
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Contact: Skylar Shumate 617-358-6157 whippd@bu.edu
Contact: Martha Hessler 314-286-1478 mjhessler@wustl.edu

Locations
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United States, Massachusetts
Center for Neurorehabilitation, College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, Sargent College, Boston University Recruiting
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 02215
Contact: Skylar Shumate    617-358-6157    whippd@bu.edu   
Contact: Tami DeAngelis, DPT    6173586157    trork@bu.edu   
Principal Investigator: Terry Ellis, PhD, PT, NCS         
Principal Investigator: Gammon Earhart, PhD, PT         
United States, Missouri
Washington University St. Louis Recruiting
Saint Louis, Missouri, United States, 63108
Contact: Martha Hessler    314-286-1478    mjhessler@wustl.edu   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Boston University Charles River Campus
Washington University School of Medicine
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Theresa D Ellis, PhD Boston University
Principal Investigator: Gammon M Earhart, PhD Washington University School of Medicine
Publications:

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Theresa D Ellis, Assistant Professor, Boston University Charles River Campus
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03517371    
Other Study ID Numbers: 1R01HD092444 ( U.S. NIH Grant/Contract )
First Posted: May 7, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 10, 2020
Last Verified: February 2020
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by Theresa D Ellis, Boston University Charles River Campus:
Parkinson disease
Walking
Exercise
Mobile Health
Physical Therapy
Cognitive Behavioral
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Parkinson Disease
Parkinsonian Disorders
Basal Ganglia Diseases
Brain Diseases
Central Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Movement Disorders
Neurodegenerative Diseases