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Social Impairment and Social Inappropriate Behavior in Patients With First Episode Psychosis: A Caregivers' Perspective

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03501160
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : April 17, 2018
Last Update Posted : July 18, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborator:
Hospital Authority, Hong Kong
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Chan Cheuk Yin, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Brief Summary:
Social impairment is one of the core symptoms in first episode psychosis and a part of its diagnostic criteria. Social impairment not only affects families and working performance but also creates distress and disharmony in social interactions and relationships. Despite of negative symptoms and social cognitive impairment found in patient suffering from first episode psychosis, clinicians occasionally identified socially inappropriate affectionate behavior after onset of psychotic disorder. Socially inappropriate affectionate behaviors mainly observed in form of childish behavior or regressive behavior. It was found limited research focus on schizophrenic regression and social inappropriate behaviors in patient with first episode psychosis recently. It was worth to investigate this above observed phenomenon and gain more understanding in comorbidity symptoms in first episode psychosis. This study was expected to explore the social impairment and socially inappropriate behavior in patients with first episode psychosis and provide a descriptive summary and further understanding on the above phenomenon. It was expected the sharing from caregivers would offer a good opportunity to explore the clinical presentation of socially inappropriate affectionate behavior and their perceived burdens and caregiving distress.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment
First Episode Psychosis Other: Face-to face semi-structured in-depth interview

  Show Detailed Description

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Study Type : Observational [Patient Registry]
Estimated Enrollment : 10 participants
Observational Model: Family-Based
Time Perspective: Prospective
Target Follow-Up Duration: 6 Months
Official Title: Social Impairment and Social Inappropriate Behavior in Patients With First Episode Psychosis: A Caregivers' Perspective
Estimated Study Start Date : July 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : November 30, 2018
Estimated Study Completion Date : February 28, 2019

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine



Intervention Details:
  • Other: Face-to face semi-structured in-depth interview
    Face-to face semi-structured in-depth interview will be arranged in order to explore the inappropriate social behavior and caregiver stress from caregivers. The interview will be guided by a semi-structured interview guide which specially designed for exploring clinical picture of inappropriate social and affectionate behavior and caregiving distress. The interview guide mainly consisted of specific questions and open-ended questions that encourage the subjects to talk freely in relevant topics during interview. Demographic data was also collected in the beginning of interview. Each interview will be conducted around 60 minutes until data saturated. The interview will be audio-taped with informed consent from subjects.


Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. social impairment and socially inappropriate behavior in patients with first episode psychosis and its related prevailing caregiving stress and burdens. [ Time Frame: 6 Months ]

    To identify and assess the clinical pictures of social impairment and social inappropriate behavior in first episode psychosis and its impact and related caregiving stress from caregivers' perspective by using face-to face semi-structured in-depth interview.

    This piece of study would explore the social impairment and socially inappropriate behavior in patients with first episode psychosis. This study was expected to provide a descriptive summary and further understanding on the phenomenon interested. It would hope to arouse social attention and provide insight in future planning of social and healthcare resources in community regarding the prevailing burdens and caregiving stress perceived by caregivers of individuals who diagnosed first episode psychosis with socially inappropriate behavior in Hong Kong.




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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 64 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Sampling Method:   Non-Probability Sample
Study Population
Social impairment is one of the core symptoms in first episode psychosis and a part of its diagnostic criteria. Social impairment not only affects families and working performance but also creates distress and disharmony in social interactions and relationships. Despite of negative symptoms and social cognitive impairment found in patient suffering from first episode psychosis, clinicians occasionally identified socially inappropriate affectionate behavior after onset of psychotic disorder. Socially inappropriate behavior was mainly observed as social inappropriate affectionate behavior, childish behavior and regressive behavior. Clinicians observed some patient became excessively dependent on family members and displayed intimate physical contact towards family members. Such socially inappropriate behaviors may explain by schizophrenic thinking or schizophrenic regression.
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  1. Active Chinese case in psychiatric specialist out-patient clinic (Preferred FEP-EASY group aged 15-25)
  2. Suffering from schizophrenic spectrum disorder (ICD-10)
  3. Showing social inappropriate behavior after onset of schizophrenic spectrum disorder

Exclusion Criteria:

  1. Case of bipolar affective disorder, drug induced psychosis and intellectual disability
  2. Case of active substance abuse
  3. Case of presenting active psychotic symptoms

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03501160


Contacts
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Contact: Cheuk Yin Chan +852 26892069 ccy922@ha.org.hk
Contact: WAI SAU, DICKY CHUNG, Dr. chungws@ha.org.hk

Locations
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Hong Kong
North District Hospital, Hospital Authority Recruiting
Sheung Shui, Hong Kong
Contact: Cheuk Yin Chan    852-26893070    ccy922@ha.org.hk   
Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, Hospital Authority, HKSAR Recruiting
Tai Po, Hong Kong
Contact: Cheuk Yin Chan    852-26893070    ccy922@ha.org.hk   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Chinese University of Hong Kong
Hospital Authority, Hong Kong

Additional Information:

Publications of Results:
Cameron, N., & Allport, Gordon W. (1939). Deterioration and regression in schizophrenic thinking. The Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 34(2), 265-270.
Cameron, N., & Dashiell, John F. (1938). Reasoning, Regression and Communication in Schizophrenics. Psychological Monographs, 50(1), I-34.
Lehrman, S. (1940). Schizophrenic "deterioration". Psychiatric Quarterly, 14(1), 140- 156.

Other Publications:
Cowen, P., Harrison, P., & Burns, T. (2012). Shorter Oxford textbook of psychiatry. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Hirsch, S., & Weinberger, D. (2003). Schizophrenia (2nd ed.). Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Science.
Meyer, R. A. & Maccabe, L. R. (2012). Schizophrenia. Medicine, 40(11), 586-590.
Polit, D. F., & Beck, C. T. (2013). Essentials of nursing research: Appraising evidence for nursing practice. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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Responsible Party: Chan Cheuk Yin, postgraduate student in MSc in Mental Health, CUHK, Chinese University of Hong Kong
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03501160     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: Joint CUHK-NTEC CREC 2018.079
First Posted: April 17, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: July 18, 2018
Last Verified: July 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Chan Cheuk Yin, Chinese University of Hong Kong:
Regressive behaviors
Childish behaviors
Affection expression socially inappropriate behaviors
Social Inappropriate Behaviors
Social Impairment

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Psychotic Disorders
Mental Disorders
Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders