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The Effects of Emotional Exposure on State Anxiety

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03458702
Recruitment Status : Completed
First Posted : March 8, 2018
Last Update Posted : March 21, 2018
Sponsor:
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Texas Tech University

Brief Summary:
In summary, state anxiety scores indicate that both YogaFit and seated rest were effective at acutely reducing state anxiety post-condition, but not at preventing an induced anxiety responses post-exposure. However, physiological measures indicate a healthy adaptive response to YogaFit and rest both post-condition and post-exposure.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Generalized Anxiety Disorder Behavioral: YogaFit Not Applicable

Detailed Description:
Rest or acute exercise can decrease state anxiety, with some evidence showing acute exercise to prevent elevations in anxiety after exposure to emotional stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an acute YogaFit session on state anxiety, heart rate, and measures of heart rate variability (HRV) to determine whether yoga provides short-term protection against emotional stimuli. Both time-domain and frequency-domain measures of HRV were assessed. Forty healthy, female college students completed a thirty-min session of YogaFit along with a time-matched seated rest condition on separate days. After each condition, participants viewed 30 min of emotional picture stimuli. State anxiety, HR, and HRV were assessed baseline, post-condition, and post-exposure to emotional stimuli.

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Actual Enrollment : 56 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Crossover Assignment
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: The Effects of Yoga and Quiet Rest on Subjective Levels of Anxiety and Physiological Correlates: A 2-way Randomized Crossover Design
Actual Study Start Date : September 12, 2013
Actual Primary Completion Date : March 15, 2014
Actual Study Completion Date : May 2014

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Anxiety

Arm Intervention/treatment
Experimental: YogaFit
Participants participated in a 30 min YogaFit Session
Behavioral: YogaFit
For YogaFit Vinyasa Flow (referred to as YogaFit in this manuscript)], participants followed, via digital versatile disc, a standardized YogaFit format choreographed by an American Council of Exercise Certified and Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT). YogaFit was performed in the same laboratory setting and lasted 30 min. YogaFit is a westernized version of yoga that does not use Sanskrit terms (Shaw 2009). Breath was an integral part of every movement with specific breath rates for each phase of the session. The objective was to move the body with intention and purpose and be present in the body.
Other Name: Quiet Rest

No Intervention: Quiet Rest
Participants participated in 30 min of Quiet Rest



Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in state anxiety from baseline and then after 30 min of quiet rest [ Time Frame: measurement taken at baseline and taken again following 30 min quiet rest ]
    measured by Spielberg's 20 question State Anxiety Questionnaire (STAI-YI)

  2. Change in state anxiety after 30 min of quiet rest and then after 30 min of viewing emotionally disturbing pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min quiet rest and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally disturbing pictures from IAPS ]
    measured by Spielberg's 20 question State Anxiety Questionnaire (STAI-YI)

  3. Change in state anxiety after 30 min of yoga and then after 30 min of viewing emotionally disturbing pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min of yoga and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally arousing pictures from IAPS ]
    measured by Spielberg's 20 question State Anxiety Questionnaire (STAI-YI)


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Change in heart rate (HR) from baseline and then after 30 min of quiet rest [ Time Frame: measurement taken at baseline and taken again following 30 min of quiet rest ]
    HR in beats per min

  2. Change in HR after 30 min of quiet rest and then after 30 min of viewing emotionally disturbing pictures from IAPS [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min quiet rest and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally arousing pictures from IAPS ]
    HR in beats per min

  3. Change in HR after 30 min of yoga and then after viewing 30 min of emotionally disturbing pictures from IAPS [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min of yoga and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally arousing pictures from IAPS ]
    HR in beats per min

  4. Change in time domain measures of Heart Rate Variability (HRV) the Root Mean Square of Successive R R Intervals (RMSSD) from baseline and then after 30 min of quiet rest [ Time Frame: measurement taken at baseline and taken again following 30 min quiet rest ]
    RMSSD measured by Thought Technology Biograph Infinity System

  5. Change in RMSSD after 30 min of quiet rest and then after 30 min of viewing emotionally disturbing pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min quiet rest and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally disturbing pictures from IAPS ]
    RMSSD measured by Thought Technology Biograph Infinity System

  6. Change in RMSSD after 30 min of yoga and then after 30 min of viewing emotionally disturbing pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min of yoga and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally arousing pictures from IAPS ]
    RMSSD measured by Thought Technology Biograph Infinity System

  7. Change in the low-frequency measure of HRV in n.u. (LFNU) from baseline and then after 30 min of quiet rest [ Time Frame: measurement taken at baseline and taken again following 30 min of quiet rest ]
    Low-frequency HRV in n.u. (.04-.12 Hz) measured by Thought Technology Biograph Infinity System

  8. Change in LFNU after 30 min of quiet rest and then after 30 min of viewing emotionally disturbing pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min quiet rest and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally disturbing pictures from IAPS ]
    Low-frequency HRV in n.u. (.04-.12 Hz) measured by Thought Technology Biograph Infinity System

  9. Change in LFNU after 30 min of yoga and then after 30 min of viewing emotionally disturbing pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) [ Time Frame: measurement taken following 30 min of yoga and taken again after viewing 30 min of emotionally arousing pictures from IAPS ]
    Low-frequency HRV in n.u. (.04-.12 Hz) measured by Thought Technology Biograph Infinity System



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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 25 Years   (Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   Female
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

The inclusion criteria included women who:

  • were between 18 and 25 years of age;
  • were not suffering from any medical conditions that would influence the results or compromise safety during training—such as disorders effecting balance, or pregnancy;
  • who were not taking antidepressant or anti-anxiety medication;
  • were not clinically diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder in the previous six months;
  • were within the normal range (± 1 SD from the M) for female college students for trait anxiety according to Spielberger's Trait Anxiety Inventory [(STAI-Y2); range: 40.40 ± 10.15] (Spielberger 1983);
  • were within normal (minimal to mild) levels of depression according to the Beck Depression Inventory [(BDI); range: 0-18] (Oliver and Simmons 1984);
  • had a normal menstrual cycle (cycles occurring less than every 26 to 35 days and lasting less than 2 or more than 7 days);
  • were not considered high-risk for dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) based on a standardized questionnaire approved by the University Radiation Safety Committee; and
  • were familiar with yoga or had not participated in at least 3 yoga practice sessions.

Exclusion Criteria:

  • The exclusion criteria included women who:

    • were less than 18 or more than 25 years of age;
    • were suffering from any medical conditions that would influence the results or compromise safety during training—such as disorders effecting balance, or pregnancy;
    • who were taking antidepressant or anti-anxiety medication;
    • were clinically diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder in the previous six months;
    • were not within the normal range (± 1 SD from the M) for female college students for trait anxiety according to Spielberger's Trait Anxiety Inventory [(STAI-Y2); range: 40.40 ± 10.15];
    • were not within normal (minimal to mild) levels of depression according to the Beck Depression Inventory [(BDI); range: 0-18];
    • had an abnormal menstrual cycle (cycles occurring less than every 26 to 35 days and lasting less than 2 or more than 7 days);
    • were considered high-risk for dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) based on a standardized questionnaire approved by the University Radiation Safety Committee; and
    • were not familiar with yoga or had not participated in at least 3 yoga practice sessions.

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03458702


Locations
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United States, Texas
Texas Tech University
Lubbock, Texas, United States, 79409
Sponsors and Collaborators
Texas Tech University

Publications automatically indexed to this study by ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier (NCT Number):
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Responsible Party: Texas Tech University
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03458702     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: 504055
First Posted: March 8, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: March 21, 2018
Last Verified: March 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: No

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Texas Tech University:
autonomic function
emotion
heart rate variability

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Anxiety Disorders
Mental Disorders