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INSPIRE: Integrated Services for Pain: Interventions to Reduce Pain Effectively

The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Know the risks and potential benefits of clinical studies and talk to your health care provider before participating. Read our disclaimer for details.
 
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03454555
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : March 6, 2018
Last Update Posted : June 27, 2019
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
University of North Carolina Health Care System
Duke University Health System
Vanderbilt University Health System
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
RTI International

Brief Summary:

Up to one-third of Americans suffer from chronic noncancer pain (CNCP)(Institute of Medicine, 2011). Opioids are often used to treat CNCP. Once on chronic opioid therapy (COT), individuals often continue for months or years(Martin et al., 2011; Vanderlip et al., 2014). Evidence for the effectiveness of COT to treat CNCP is insufficient, exposing individuals to known risk. Strategies are needed to reduce/eliminate COT in patients who are not benefiting from opioids while ensuring access for those who are.

The researchers will employ a multisite pragmatic trial using real-time randomization to examine the comparative effectiveness of 2 approaches: a guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy approach integrated with shared decision making (SDM) (Arm 1) compared with a guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy approach integrated with motivational interviewing (MI) and cognitive behavioral therapy for chronic pain (CBT-CP) (Arm 2).

The researchers will examine the impact of the 2 approaches on several outcomes. The study will examine which set of patients have greater opioid dose reduction, improved functioning, and/or lower pain scores. Clinical outcomes will be assessed using electronic health record data at 4 timepoints: baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months. Patient-reported outcomes, including physical functioning and level of pain, will be measured via patient survey at 3 timepoints: baseline, 6 months, and 12 months.

The study will include patients from North Carolina and Tennessee. The researchers will enroll 530 patients in each study arm for a total enrollment of 1,060. This sample size will provide robust power to detect clinically important differences in reduction of opioid use between the two study arms.

Analyses will include longitudinal (mixed effects) models to compare the change in outcomes from baseline to each timepoint between the two study arms. The project team will explore differences in the intervention effect according to participant characteristics such as age, sex, baseline pain level, baseline opioid dose, physical comorbidities, mental health comorbidities, and a history of substance abuse. Qualitative research methods will be used to obtain patient input on their experiences.


Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Chronic Pain Behavioral: Shared Decision Making Behavioral: Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain Not Applicable

  Show Detailed Description

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Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 1060 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two intervention arms for the duration of the study. The study will use real-time randomization to limit participant loss prior to treatment. Eligible patients will be randomized using a stratified, permuted-block design, as this constrained randomization approach ensures balance between treatment groups within each of the 3 clinical institutions (our only stratification factor) at the completion of each block. Consequently, throughout the trial, the treatment arms will have approximately equal sample sizes both within a site and across the study.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Integrated Health Services to Reduce Opioid Use While Managing Chronic Pain
Actual Study Start Date : June 21, 2019
Estimated Primary Completion Date : September 30, 2022
Estimated Study Completion Date : September 30, 2022

Resource links provided by the National Library of Medicine

MedlinePlus related topics: Chronic Pain

Arm Intervention/treatment
Active Comparator: Arm 1
Arm 1 patients will receive guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy based on clinical guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain plus the Shared Decision-Making (SDM) intervention.
Behavioral: Shared Decision Making
The Shared Decision Making (SDM) intervention is a behavioral intervention to explore and compare treatment options, assess a patient's values and preferences, and reach a shared decision. The intervention will have both clinician and patient components. The content of the clinician component will be based on the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) SHARE Approach, which is a 5-step process for shared decision making that includes exploring and comparing the benefits, harms, and risks of each option through meaningful dialogue about what matters most to the patient (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2017) . Patients randomized to Arm 1 will have their study visits and opioid use managed by an SDM-trained clinician at their practice.

Active Comparator: Arm 2
Arm 2 patients will receive the guideline-concordant pharmacotherapy based on clinical guidelines for opioid therapy for chronic noncancer pain plus the Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain (MI+CBT+CP) Intervention.
Behavioral: Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain
The Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain intervention is an empirically based behavioral pain management behavioral therapy intervention (Monticone et al., 2015), including MI to enhance motivation for opioid dose reduction or cessation and CBT-CP for pain coping skills enhancement. We anticipate one MI session that will focus on engaging, focusing, evoking, and planning. We anticipate 8 sessions of CBT-CP, as is standard, delivered in a group setting.




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Reduction of opioid use [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Average daily opioid dose in milligrams of morphine equivalent. Briefly, total morphine equivalents for each prescription will be calculated by multiplying the quantity of each prescription by the strength of the prescription (milligrams of opioid per unit dispensed). The quantity-strength product is then multiplied by conversion factors derived from published sources to estimate the milligrams of morphine equivalent to the opioids dispensed in the prescription. The total average dose in morphine equivalents per day supplied is calculated by summing the morphine equivalents for each prescription filled during a given period, and dividing by the number of days supplied. Prescribing data are derived from electronic health records (EHRs).

  2. Reduction of opioid use [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Average daily opioid dose in milligrams of morphine equivalent. Briefly, total morphine equivalents for each prescription will be calculated by multiplying the quantity of each prescription by the strength of the prescription (milligrams of opioid per unit dispensed). The quantity-strength product is then multiplied by conversion factors derived from published sources to estimate the milligrams of morphine equivalent to the opioids dispensed in the prescription. The total average dose in morphine equivalents per day supplied is calculated by summing the morphine equivalents for each prescription filled during a given period, and dividing by the number of days supplied. Prescribing data are derived from electronic health records (EHRs).

  3. Reduction of opioid use [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Average daily opioid dose in milligrams of morphine equivalent. Briefly, total morphine equivalents for each prescription will be calculated by multiplying the quantity of each prescription by the strength of the prescription (milligrams of opioid per unit dispensed). The quantity-strength product is then multiplied by conversion factors derived from published sources to estimate the milligrams of morphine equivalent to the opioids dispensed in the prescription. The total average dose in morphine equivalents per day supplied is calculated by summing the morphine equivalents for each prescription filled during a given period, and dividing by the number of days supplied. Prescribing data are derived from electronic health records (EHRs).

  4. Reduction of opioid use [ Time Frame: 18 months ]
    Average daily opioid dose in milligrams of morphine equivalent. Briefly, total morphine equivalents for each prescription will be calculated by multiplying the quantity of each prescription by the strength of the prescription (milligrams of opioid per unit dispensed). The quantity-strength product is then multiplied by conversion factors derived from published sources to estimate the milligrams of morphine equivalent to the opioids dispensed in the prescription. The total average dose in morphine equivalents per day supplied is calculated by summing the morphine equivalents for each prescription filled during a given period, and dividing by the number of days supplied. Prescribing data are derived from electronic health records (EHRs).


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Physical functioning [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    PROMIS-PF (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Physical functioning). Assesses self-reported capability rather than actual performance of physical activities. Patient-reported outcome.

  2. Physical functioning [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    PROMIS-PF (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Physical functioning). Assesses self-reported capability rather than actual performance of physical activities. Patient-reported outcome.

  3. Physical functioning [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    PROMIS-PF (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Physical functioning). Assesses self-reported capability rather than actual performance of physical activities. Patient-reported outcome.

  4. Pain interference on functioning [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    PROMIS-PI (Pain Interference), 8-item Short Form. Assesses extent to which pain interferes with daily functioning. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  5. Pain interference on functioning [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    PROMIS-PI (Pain Interference), 8-item Short Form. Assesses extent to which pain interferes with daily functioning. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  6. Pain interference on functioning [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    PROMIS-PI (Pain Interference), 8-item Short Form. Assesses extent to which pain interferes with daily functioning. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  7. Pain Intensity [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    PROMIS Pain Intensity Short Form, 3 items. Assesses intensity of pain over the past 7 days. Patient-reported outcome.

  8. Pain Intensity [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    PROMIS Pain Intensity Short Form, 3 items. Assesses intensity of pain over the past 7 days. Patient-reported outcome.

  9. Pain Intensity [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    PROMIS Pain Intensity Short Form, 3 items. Assesses intensity of pain over the past 7 days. Patient-reported outcome.

  10. Emotional distress [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    PROMIS Emotional Distress - Anxiety, 4-items Short Form. Assesses generalized anxiety/distress over the past 7 days. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  11. Emotional distress [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    PROMIS Emotional Distress - Anxiety, 4-items Short Form. Assesses generalized anxiety/distress over the past 7 days. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  12. Emotional distress [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    PROMIS Emotional Distress - Anxiety, 4-items Short Form. Assesses generalized anxiety/distress over the past 7 days. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  13. Depressive symptoms [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    PROMIS Emotional Distress - Depression, 4-item Short Form. Assesses depressive symptoms over the past 7 days. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  14. Depressive symptoms [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    PROMIS Emotional Distress - Depression, 4-item Short Form. Assesses depressive symptoms over the past 7 days. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  15. Depressive symptoms [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    PROMIS Emotional Distress - Depression, 4-item Short Form. Assesses depressive symptoms over the past 7 days. Items measured on 5-point Likert scale. Patient-reported outcome.

  16. Satisfaction with pain care [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Assesses current satisfaction with pain management, 1 item. Patient-reported outcome.

  17. Satisfaction with pain care [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Assesses current satisfaction with pain management, 1 item. Patient-reported outcome.

  18. Satisfaction with pain care [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Assesses current satisfaction with pain management, 1 item. Patient-reported outcome.

  19. Brief Pain Inventory [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) short form, 11 items. Asks for numeric ratings of pain intensity and pain interference. Patient-reported outcome.

  20. Brief Pain Inventory [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) short form, 11 items. Asks for numeric ratings of pain intensity and pain interference. Patient-reported outcome.

  21. Brief Pain Inventory [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) short form, 11 items. Asks for numeric ratings of pain intensity and pain interference. Patient-reported outcome.

  22. Satisfaction with study health information [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Assesses satisfaction with and use of study intervention materials. 3 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  23. Satisfaction with study health information [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Assesses satisfaction with and use of study intervention materials. 3 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  24. Non-opioid treatments [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Assesses treatments used to manage physical pain, 18 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  25. Non-opioid treatments [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Assesses treatments used to manage physical pain, 18 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  26. Non-opioid treatments [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Assesses treatments used to manage physical pain, 18 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  27. Intent to taper [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Assesses intent to reduce the amount of opioids taken, 2 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  28. Intent to taper [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Assesses intent to reduce the amount of opioids taken, 2 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  29. Intent to taper [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Assesses intent to reduce the amount of opioids taken, 2 items. Patient-reported outcome.

  30. Relative opioid use [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Assesses overall use of opioids relative to baseline. 1 item. Patient-reported outcome.

  31. Relative opioid use [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Assesses overall use of opioids relative to baseline. 1 item. Patient-reported outcome.

  32. Patient-Centered Communication [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care, short form, 6 items (PCC-CA-6). Assesses patients' experiences with doctors and other health professionals in 6 domains. Patient-reported outcome.

  33. Patient-Centered Communication [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care, short form, 6 items (PCC-CA-6). Assesses patients' experiences with doctors and other health professionals in 6 domains. Patient-reported outcome.

  34. Patient-Centered Communication [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care, short form, 6 items (PCC-CA-6). Assesses patients' experiences with doctors and other health professionals in 6 domains. Patient-reported outcome.

  35. Hospitalization [ Time Frame: 6 months ]
    Assesses hospitalization and emergency department visits related to overdose, withdrawal, or self-harm. Patient-reported outcome.

  36. Hospitalization [ Time Frame: 12 months ]
    Assesses hospitalization and emergency department visits related to overdose, withdrawal, or self-harm. Patient-reported outcome.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contacts provided below. For general information, Learn About Clinical Studies.


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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years to 75 Years   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   No
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Aged 18 to 75 years
  • History of chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP)
  • Receiving high-dose COT for chronic non-cancer pain (CNCP) as evidenced by current or most recent prescription of an average daily morphine-equivalent dose (MED) of 40 mg or greater for CNCP.
  • Receiving care at a participating clinic from a participating provider, as evidenced by at least 1 in-person visit within the past 12 months
  • Have a visit scheduled within the next 90 days

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Not meeting the above inclusion criteria
  • Opioid use is for pain related to a cancer diagnosis
  • Opioid use is for maintenance treatment of an opioid use disorder (OUD)
  • Suicide attempt within the past 3 years
  • Active suicidal ideation
  • Currently receiving CBT
  • Non-English speaking
  • Other reason at the discretion of the investigator

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03454555


Contacts
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Contact: Laura Wagner, MPH 919-316-3802 lwagner@rti.org

Locations
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United States, North Carolina
University of North Carolina Health Care System Not yet recruiting
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States, 27599
Contact: Audrina Bunton, MA, LPCS    919-843-3084    audrina_bunton@unc.edu   
Principal Investigator: Paul Chelminski, MD,MPH,FACP         
Sub-Investigator: Timothy Ives, PharmD,CPP,MPH         
Sub-Investigator: Debbie Barrett, PhD, LCSW         
Duke University Health System Not yet recruiting
Durham, North Carolina, United States, 27701
Contact: Jasmin Carmona, PhD, LMFT    919-668-0622    jasmin.carmona@duke.edu   
Principal Investigator: Li-Tzy Wu, RN, ScD, MA         
Sub-Investigator: Rowena Dolor, MD, MHS         
Sub-Investigator: Lynn Bowlby, MD         
United States, Tennessee
Vanderbilt University Health System Recruiting
Nashville, Tennessee, United States, 27232
Contact: David Crenshaw, LMSW    615-343-1765    david.l.crenshaw@vumc.org   
Principal Investigator: Kristin A Swygert, PhD, DPT         
Sub-Investigator: Charlene Dewey, MD, Med, FACP         
Sub-Investigator: Rogelio Coronado, PT, PhD         
Sponsors and Collaborators
RTI International
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
University of North Carolina Health Care System
Duke University Health System
Vanderbilt University Health System
Investigators
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Principal Investigator: Lauren McCormack, PhD, MSPH RTI International

Publications:
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Responsible Party: RTI International
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03454555     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: PCORI-OPD-1610-37006
First Posted: March 6, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: June 27, 2019
Last Verified: June 2019

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Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No
Keywords provided by RTI International:
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Comparative Effectiveness Research
Analgesics, Opioid
Decision Making, Shared
Motivational Interviewing
Cognitive Therapy
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Additional relevant MeSH terms:
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Chronic Pain
Pain
Neurologic Manifestations
Signs and Symptoms
Analgesics, Opioid
Narcotics
Central Nervous System Depressants
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Analgesics
Sensory System Agents
Peripheral Nervous System Agents