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Home Monitoring in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis; Improving Use of Anti-fibrotic Medication and Quality of Life

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ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03420235
Recruitment Status : Recruiting
First Posted : February 2, 2018
Last Update Posted : February 2, 2018
Sponsor:
Collaborators:
OLVG
St. Antonius Hospital
Zuyderland Medical Centre
Information provided by (Responsible Party):
Marlies Wijsenbeek, Erasmus Medical Center

Brief Summary:
In this study it will be investigate whether a home monitoring program improves disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) through appropriate medication use and subsequently results in better objective and subjective outcomes.

Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Other: Home monitoring program Not Applicable

Detailed Description:

IPF is a chronic disease with progressive scarring of the lung tissue (fibrosis), resulting in a poor prognosis and a devastating impact on the lives of patients and their families. Progressive shortness of breath, cough and fatigue are major factors influencing health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with IPF. Recently two anti-fibrotic drugs became available that slow down disease progression. The availability of effective drugs for this devastating disease has importantly changed daily care and research in IPF. Currently, one of the major challenges in daily IPF care is the evaluation of how individual patients objectively and subjectively experience treatment and benefit from treatment. The use of information communication technology in health care, also named e-health, is a promising solution to improve the quality of care. E-health allows remote exchange of data between patients and health care professionals which enables monitoring, research and management of long term conditions. Also communication between patients and physicians, and physicians mutually, becomes more accessible. This creates an opportunity for earlier intervention by health care professionals, which may prevent a hospital admission. This might improve quality of life and reduce costs. Patients easily get access to up-to-date and tailored information, in an interactive way. By providing these tools, patients may better understand their health conditions and become actively involved in management of their own health care, which may lead to a better health status. An 'internet tool' for patients with IPF have been developed, providing information and enabling them to keep track of their own symptoms, HRQOL scores, medication use and lung function results.

In this study it will be investigated whether a home monitoring program improves disease-specific HRQOL for IPF patients through appropriate medication use and subsequently results in better objective and subjective outcomes.


Study Type : Interventional  (Clinical Trial)
Estimated Enrollment : 90 participants
Allocation: Randomized
Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment
Intervention Model Description: This is a prospective randomized clinical multi-center study to evaluate the effect of home monitoring on disease-specific HRQOL, (appropriate) medication use and other patient-relevant outcomes in patients with IPF treated with anti-fibrotic drugs. Patients with IPF about to start on anti-fibrotic medication will be randomly assigned to receive either the home monitoring program integrated with standard care or standard care alone after informed consent. Patient will be stratified for study center and medication.
Masking: None (Open Label)
Primary Purpose: Treatment
Official Title: Home Monitoring in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis; Improving Use of Anti-fibrotic Medication and Quality of Life
Actual Study Start Date : January 9, 2018
Estimated Primary Completion Date : October 2020
Estimated Study Completion Date : October 2020


Arm Intervention/treatment
No Intervention: Control group
Control group will receive standard care alone.
Experimental: Home monitoring group
Intervention will consist of a home monitoring program added to standard care.
Other: Home monitoring program
The home monitoring program consists of 1) the use of an interactive internet tool to coach patients and enhance self-management 2) home-based pulmonary function testing with a handheld spirometer and 3) recording of patient-reported outcomes (PROs).




Primary Outcome Measures :
  1. Difference in the change in total score of King's brief Interstitial Lung Disease Health Status (K-BILD) questionnaire between the home monitoring group and the standard care group [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Change in HRQOL assessed by the K-BILD, between control group and home monitoring group at the end of the study. The K-BILD is a 15-item self-administered questionnaire on a 7-point response scale. It has three domains: breathlessness and activities, psychological and chest symptoms.The domain and total score ranges are 0-100, with the higher scores corresponding with better HRQL.


Secondary Outcome Measures :
  1. Difference in the change in total score of King's brief Interstitial Lung Disease Health Status (K-BILD) questionnaire between the home monitoring group and the standard care group [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Change in HRQOL assessed by the K-BILD, between control group and home monitoring group. The K-BILD is a 15-item self-administered questionnaire on a 7-point response scale. It has three domains: breathlessness and activities, psychological and chest symptoms.The domain and total score ranges are 0-100, with the higher scores corresponding with better HRQL.

  2. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores (GRC) [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Patients will fill in the Global Rating of Change (GRC) which measures whether QoL has improved or deteriorated over a certain period of time, with scores range from -7 to +7, with positive scores corresponding with improvement in QoL

  3. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores (EQ5D) [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Patients will complete the EQ-5D-5L questionnaire, a standardized instrument to measure health outcomes in two components: health description and valuation. It comprises five dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression on a 5-point scale. From these 5 answers an index value is derived between 0 and 1, with a higher value corresponding with a better QoL. In the valuation part the patients' general health status is evaluated using a VAS-score from 0 to 100, with a higher score representing a better QoL.

  4. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores (HADS) [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Patients will complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a 14-item questionnaire with 7 questions in the domain anxiety and 7 questions in the domain depression on a 0-3 Likert scale. Higher values represent higher anxiety and depression levels, with a maximum of 21 point in both domains. There is a cut-off score of 8/21 for anxiety and depression.

  5. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores (HADS) [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Patients will complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a 14-item questionnaire with 7 questions in the domain anxiety and 7 questions in the domain depression on a 0-3 Likert scale. Higher values represent higher anxiety and depression levels, with a maximum of 21 point in both domains. There is a cut-off score of 8/21 for anxiety and depression.

  6. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores (EQ5D) [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Patients will complete the EQ-5D-5L questionnaire, a standardized instrument to measure health outcomes in two components: health description and valuation. It comprises five dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression on a 5-point scale. From these 5 answers an index value is derived between 0 and 1, with a higher value corresponding with a better QoL. In the valuation part the patients' general health status is evaluated using a VAS-score from 0 to 100, with a higher score representing a better QoL.

  7. Patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores (GRC) [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Patients will complete the Global Rating of Change (GRC) which measures whether QoL has improved or deteriorated over a certain period of time, with scores range from -7 to +7, with positive scores corresponding with improvement in QoL.

  8. Patient expectations and satisfaction with medication (PESaM scores) [ Time Frame: Baseline and 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between patient expectations with medication and consecutive experiences measured with the PESaM questionnaire which assess patient expectations at baseline in an 11-item questionnaire and patient experiences and side-effects with medication after 12 weeks in a 26-item questionnaire on a 0-4 Likert scale. For each question it is different whether a higher score represents better or worse outcomes.

  9. Patient expectations and satisfaction with medication (PESaM scores) [ Time Frame: Baseline and 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between patient expectations with medication and consecutive experiences measured with the PESaM questionnaire which assess patient expectations at baseline in an 11-item questionnaire and patient experiences and side-effects with medication after 24 weeks in a 26-item questionnaire on a 0-4 Likert scale. For each question it is different whether a higher score represents better or worse outcomes.

  10. Patient satisfaction with medication (PESaM scores) [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Overall patient satisfaction with medication after 24 weeks resulting from the 26-item PESaM questionnaire. For each question it is different whether a higher score represents better or worse outcomes

  11. Patient satisfaction with the care process [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Evaluation and satisfaction questionnaire at the end of the study. 10-item questionnaire with answers on a scale from -5 to 5, with higher scores corresponding with higher satisfaction

  12. Number of patients who discontinue use of medication, pills used and pills wasted [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Every week patients register whether they missed pills (and the amount of pills wasted). Discontinuation or switch of medication is registered both by patients and researchers.

  13. Amount of contacts with healthcare providers and number of visits per patient [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    During the study patients register their contacts with healthcare providers (hospital visits, general practitioner visits, physiotherapist, dietician, psychologist), after 24 weeks the amount of contacts will be assessed

  14. FVC decline [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    FVC decline measured by hospital-based spirometry and daily home spirometry

  15. FVC decline [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    FVC decline measured by hospital-based spirometry and daily home spirometry

  16. Personal goal of patient defined at start of study [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Change in score of personal goal. Patients define a personal goal at the start of the study and they score on a scale from 0 -10 how far they have reached their goal


Other Outcome Measures:
  1. Home monitoring values of FVC compared to in hospital values of lung function [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Home monitoring values compared to in hospital values of lung function

  2. Home monitoring values of FVC compared to in hospital values of lung function [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Home monitoring values compared to in hospital values of lung function

  3. Correlation between FVC measurements and K-BILD [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and K-BILD. The K-BILD is a 15-item self-administered questionnaire on a 7-point response scale. It has three domains: breathlessness and activities, psychological and chest symptoms.The domain and total score ranges are 0-100, with the higher scores corresponding with better HRQL.

  4. Correlation between FVC measurements and K-BILD [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and K-BILD. The K-BILD is a 15-item self-administered questionnaire on a 7-point response scale. It has three domains: breathlessness and activities, psychological and chest symptoms.The domain and total score ranges are 0-100, with the higher scores corresponding with better HRQL.

  5. Correlation between FVC measurements and EQ5D [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and EQ5D. The EQ5D is a standardized instrument to measure health outcomes in two components: health description and valuation. It comprises five dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression on a 5-point scale. From these 5 answers an index value is derived between 0 and 1, with a higher value corresponding with a better QoL. In the valuation part the patients' general health status is evaluated using a VAS-score from 0 to 100, with a higher score representing a better QoL.

  6. Correlation between FVC measurements and EQ5D [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and EQ5D. The EQ5D is a standardized instrument to measure health outcomes in two components: health description and valuation. It comprises five dimensions: mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain/discomfort, and anxiety/depression on a 5-point scale. From these 5 answers an index value is derived between 0 and 1, with a higher value corresponding with a better QoL. In the valuation part the patients' general health status is evaluated using a VAS-score from 0 to 100, with a higher score representing a better QoL.

  7. Correlation between FVC measurements and HADS [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and HADS. The HADS is a 14-item questionnaire with 7 questions in the domain anxiety and 7 questions in the domain depression on a 0-3 Likert scale. Higher values represent higher anxiety and depression levels, with a maximum of 21 point in both domains. There is a cut-off score of 8/21 for anxiety and depression.

  8. Correlation between FVC measurements and HADS [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and HADS. The HADS is a 14-item questionnaire with 7 questions in the domain anxiety and 7 questions in the domain depression on a 0-3 Likert scale. Higher values represent higher anxiety and depression levels, with a maximum of 21 point in both domains. There is a cut-off score of 8/21 for anxiety and depression.

  9. Correlation between FVC measurements and GRC [ Time Frame: 12 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and GRC. The Global Rating of Change (GRC) measures whether QoL has improved or deteriorated over a certain period of time, with scores range from -7 to +7, with positive scores corresponding with improvement in QoL.

  10. Correlation between FVC measurements and GRC [ Time Frame: 24 weeks after inclusion ]
    Correlation between FVC and GRC. The Global Rating of Change (GRC) measures whether QoL has improved or deteriorated over a certain period of time, with scores range from -7 to +7, with positive scores corresponding with improvement in QoL.

  11. Correlation between VAS score on stability of IPF scored by patients and healthcare providers [ Time Frame: Baseline ]
    Both patients and healthcare providers will score a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) with a score between 0 (not stable) and 10 (very stable) on stability of IPF at baseline. Correlation between the VAS scores from patients and healthcare providers will be assessed.

  12. Correlation between VAS score on stability of IPF scored by patients and healthcare providers [ Time Frame: 12 weeks ]
    Both patients and healthcare providers will score the stability of their IPF on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The visual analogue scale has a score between 0 (very unstable) and 10 (very stable), therefore higher scores correspond with better outcomes. Correlation between the VAS scores from patients and healthcare providers will be assessed at 12 weeks.

  13. Correlation between VAS score on stability of IPF scored by patients and healthcare providers [ Time Frame: 24 weeks ]
    Both patients and healthcare providers will score the stability of their IPF on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The visual analogue scale has a score between 0 (very unstable) and 10 (very stable), therefore higher scores correspond with better outcomes. Correlation between the VAS scores from patients and healthcare providers will be assessed at 24 weeks.



Information from the National Library of Medicine

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Ages Eligible for Study:   18 Years and older   (Adult, Older Adult)
Sexes Eligible for Study:   All
Accepts Healthy Volunteers:   Yes
Criteria

Inclusion Criteria:

  • All patients with a diagnosis of IPF according to the ATS 2011 criteria and about to start on anti-fibrotic treatment (either nintedanib or pirfenidone)

Exclusion Criteria:

  • Not able to speak, read or write in Dutch
  • No access to internet

Information from the National Library of Medicine

To learn more about this study, you or your doctor may contact the study research staff using the contact information provided by the sponsor.

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier (NCT number): NCT03420235


Locations
Netherlands
Erasmus MC Recruiting
Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands, 3015 CE
Contact: Marlies Wijsenbeek, MD PhD    +31107030323    m.wijsenbeek-lourens@erasmusmc.nl   
Contact: Karen Moor, MD    +31107030323    c.moor@erasmusmc.nl   
Sponsors and Collaborators
Erasmus Medical Center
OLVG
St. Antonius Hospital
Zuyderland Medical Centre
Investigators
Principal Investigator: Marlies Wijsenbeek, MD PhD Erasmus MC

Responsible Party: Marlies Wijsenbeek, Dr. M.S. Wijsenbeek, pulmonologist, Principal Investigator, Erasmus Medical Center
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03420235     History of Changes
Other Study ID Numbers: NL62925.078.17
First Posted: February 2, 2018    Key Record Dates
Last Update Posted: February 2, 2018
Last Verified: February 2018
Individual Participant Data (IPD) Sharing Statement:
Plan to Share IPD: Undecided

Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Drug Product: No
Studies a U.S. FDA-regulated Device Product: No

Keywords provided by Marlies Wijsenbeek, Erasmus Medical Center:
quality of life
eHealth
patient-reported outcomes
home spirometry
cost-effectiveness
home monitoring

Additional relevant MeSH terms:
Fibrosis
Pulmonary Fibrosis
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias
Pathologic Processes
Lung Diseases
Respiratory Tract Diseases
Lung Diseases, Interstitial